Environmental Studies Courses Summer 2007


Department of Environmental Studies – Master’s Programs Courses
Department of Environmental Studies – Doctoral Program (Ph.D) Courses


Department of Environmental Studies – Master’s Programs Courses


CLASS CANCELLED 05/22/07

ESF 525
Alpine Flora

Competency Areas: Natural Communities elective

Please Note: Attendance at ALL pre-trip meetings is mandatory. Enrolled students who fail to drop the course at least 1 week before the first pre-trip meeting or who fail to attend the first pre-trip meeting will be held financially responsible for the cost of the trip and will forfeit their seat in the class. Students on the waitlist are strongly encouraged to attend the first class.

This course focuses on the flora of the alpine zone, specifically that of the Presidential Range of New Hampshire. Students will explore plant adaptations along two environmental gradients above timberline, and learn to recognize eight different alpine plant communities. Species distribution and dominance will be assessed through plot work; the effect of anthropogenic disturbance will be reviewed as well. Two pre-trip classes will introduce us to the concepts studied on the slopes of Mt. Adams and Mt. Madison. Total cost to participants is $150.00 (includes camping, food & miscellaneous expenses).

Note: This trip involves a fairly strenuous backpack up to our cabin at tree line. Students should be in good physical shape.

Section A: Laura Alexander
Time: Pre-trip meetings,
Thursdays, June 21 & July 5, 6:30 – 9:00 pm and
Sunday – Friday, July 15 – 20 (Study trip)
Maximum: 9
Credits: 2


ESS 564
Biological Concepts

Competency Areas: Cert – Required; EE; CB, EAO, IND &
RMC – Elective
Required of and Priority to ES Teacher Certification students.
Prerequisite: Introductory Biology or permission of director of Science Teacher Certification Program

This course is designed for students who have already taken introductory biology as undergraduates. It is meant to review in greater depth the basic concepts of cellular biology and will be useful for pre-service middle and secondary life science teachers who would like to explore ways to make complex topics relevant to their students. The topics to be covered include cell structure, function, and differentiation. These topics will be taught in the context of contemporary issues such as cancer genetics, pre-natal screening, and stem cell research. Students will have opportunities to investigate cell processes in detail through model building and experimentation with living cells in the laboratory.

Section A: Jane Disney
Time: Monday – Wednesday, June 11 – 13 and
Friday – Wednesday, June 15 – 20, 1:00 – 4:00 pm, and Friday, June 22, 1:00 – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 14
Credits: 2


ESF 542
Coastal Ornithology

Competency Areas: Natural Communities elective

Please Note: Attendance at ALL pre-trip meetings is mandatory. Enrolled students who fail to drop the course at least 1 week before the first pre-trip meeting or who fail to attend the first pre-trip meeting will be held financially responsible for the cost of the trip and will forfeit their seat in the class. Students on the waitlist are strongly encouraged to attend the first class.

Spectacular colonies of nesting seabirds and large flocks of migrating shorebirds are some of the more fascinating aspects of New England’s coastal avifauna. In their courtship and nesting behaviors, their abilities to find food in seemingly featureless landscapes, and their immense migratory journeys, marine birds exhibit incredible adaptations to a unique environment. During this 5-day field study trip to Cape Cod we’ll go on a whale-watching trip to Stellwagen Bank, visit a colony of nesting terns, look for migrating shorebirds, and learn to see the world through the eyes of a marine bird. Course fee: approximately $250 + food (includes boat trips, campground fees, and most gasoline and food costs).

Section A: MaryLou Soczek
Time: Pre-trip meetings, Fridays June 15 & July 6,
6:30 – 9:30 pm and
Saturday – Wednesday, July 14 – 18 (Study trip)
Maximum: 10
Credits: 2


ESE 528
Environmental Education Methods: Exhibit Development – Bronx Zoo

Competency Areas: EE – EE Methods Req Alt; EAO, CB, Cert, IND & RMC – Elective
Priority to: ES Environmental Education students.
Please Note: Attendance at ALL pre-trip meetings is mandatory. Enrolled students who fail to drop the course at least 1 week before the first pre-trip meeting or who fail to attend the first pre-trip meeting will be held financially responsible for the cost of the trip and will forfeit their seat in the class. Students on the waitlist are strongly encouraged to attend the first class.

Museums and zoos have not been immune to the increasing environmental awareness among segments of American society. Although many non-formal ‘science’ institutions have long inspired an interest in natural history and endangered species, until recently ‘environmental’ education has not been a strong agenda. Many zoos/museums are pushing the boundaries of the traditional diorama or static exhibit to tackle contemporary social and environmental concerns and by mounting concept rather than object-oriented exhibitions. The new generation of environmental projects tend to contain more political, economic, social and public policy-oriented than before. Just how far to push this envelope and still ‘entertain’ the audience of leisure seekers is a continual concern for these institutions.

The Bronx Zoo has consciously and deliberately set an agenda of educating for conservation and care for the environment. Their exhibits are engaging and provocative, sometimes directly challenging the audience to relate their personal lifestyle choices to the impact on environmental issues, habitat loss and endangered species. We will study their process for deciding on and designing, researching and evaluating the effectiveness of these cutting-edge exhibits. We will spend time at the Bronx Zoo, Central Park Zoo and the NY Aquarium. Cost – approximately $450.

Section A: Cynthia Thomashow, Jimmy Karlan and Johnny Fraser
Times: Pre-trip meetings, Fridays, June 15 & 22 and Wednesday, June 27, 9:00 am – 2:00 pm and
Sunday – Wednesday, July 8 – 11 (Study trip)
Location: (pre-trip meetings) Antioch
(study trip) New York City, Bronx Zoo
Maximum: 10
Credits: 3


ESE 523A
Environmental Education Methods: Teaching in the Outdoors

Competency Areas: EE – Methods Required Alternate; CB, EAO, Cert, IND & RMC – Elective
Priority to ES Environmental Education students.

A large majority of environmental education takes place outside the school arena. A traditional setting for environmental education includes outdoor, adventure, and wilderness education. This course will provide opportunities to learn and practice techniques for teaching in a variety of outdoor contexts. It is designed primarily for those students with limited experience teaching in the outdoors.

Section A: Brad Daniel
Time: Saturday, Sunday, Tuesday & Wednesday,
June 9, 10, 12 & 13, 9:00 am – 2:00 pm
** Monday, June 11 only, the class will meet from
5:00 – 10:30 pm for an organized night hike.
Changed 06/21/07 to: Section A: Jen and Jeremy Bean
Times: Monday, June 11, 9:00 am – 2:00 pm and 5:00 – 10:30 pm;
Tuesday & Wednesday, June 12 & 13, 9:00 am – 2:00 pm, and
Thursday, June 14, 1:00 – 5:00 pm

Maximum: 16
(1 seat reserved for Science Ed student)
Credits: 2


ESS 521
Environmental Physics for Educators

Competency Areas: Highly recommended for all Science Certs. Satisfies physics prerequisite and elective for Science Certs; EAO, EE, CB, IND & RMC – Elective.

Environmental Physics for Educators exposes students to the connection between the tenets of modern physics and the natural world. The course emphasizes concepts that help make sense of natural phenomena.

Our emphasis is on understanding and appreciating one’s environment from a new perspective. Some topics examined with this new frame of reference will include connecting Newton’s Laws, vectors and projectiles, momentum and collisions, work and energy, circular, satellite and rotational motion, static electricity, relativity, waves, sound and light to our natural and human built environments.

Section A: Jake McDermott
Time: Monday – Wednesday, June 25 – 27 and
Monday, July 2, 9:00 am – 4:00 pm
Maximum: 16
Credits: 2


ESF 547
Field Entomology: Butterflies and Other Insects

Competency Areas: Natural Communities elective

This course is an introduction to common insects, especially those in New England. Taxonomy of major insect orders, behavior of selected species, ecological roles, and co-evolution with other organisms are covered during the sessions. A theme of chemical communications will be emphasized throughout the course with related research and readings required.

Section A: Jenna Spear
Time: Thursday, June 14, 6:00 – 9:00 pm,
Saturday & Sunday, June 23 & 24 and
Friday, Saturday & Sunday, June 29, 30 and
July 1, 8:00 am – 4:30 pm
Maximum: 16
(1 seat reserved for Science Ed student)
Credits: 2


ESS 558
Forest Ecosystem Analysis

Competency Areas: CB – Required Alternate; EAO, EE, Cert, IND & RMC – Elective
Priority to Conservation Biology majors.
Prerequisites: Community Ecology of the NE Landscape or written permission of instructor attached to or on registration form.

Please Note: Attendance at ALL pre-trip meetings is mandatory. Enrolled students who fail to drop the course at least 1 week before the first pre-trip meeting or who fail to attend the first pre-trip meeting will be held financially responsible for the cost of the trip and will forfeit their seat in the class. Students on the waitlist are strongly encouraged to attend the first class.

The objectives of this course are for students to become familiar with the methodology, benefits, and challenges of conducting ecosystem-level studies. On Mt. Moosilauke and at Hubbard Brook in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, students will become familiar with the ecology of spruce-fir and northern hardwood forests through experiential learning comprised of field observations, field research and data analysis. Students will focus on field and analytical methods used to quantify species composition, structure, history, and the nutrient status of forested ecosystems. Techniques will include plot sampling, dendrochronology, and the development of nutrient budgets. Course fee: $160 for food and lodging.

Note: Course involves moderately strenuous mountain day hiking and bunk house living.

Section A: Peter Palmiotto
Time: Pre-trip meetings, Thursdays, June 7 & 28,
6:00 – 9:00 pm and
Saturday – Wednesday, July 7-11,
8:00 am – 10:00 pm (Study trip)
Maximum: 16
Credits: 2


ESX 601
Group Dynamics & Leadership I

Competency Areas: RMC – Req Alt; EE – EE Methods Req Alt; CB, EAO, Cert & IND – Elective
Note: Deadline for adding this class is June 1.

This course will focus on group development, group dynamics, and leadership. The course introduces students to elements of group dynamics and to a model that matches leadership styles to stages of group development. Students work in teams during the course and use course concepts to analyze their experience. Skills emphasized are group leadership and membership skills, group observation and feedback, conflict management, and managing diversity in groups. Students are expected to read The One Minute Manager Builds High Performing Teams by Blanchard, Carew and Parisi-Carew before the first class meeting. Special emphasis will be placed on case studies in the environmental field.

Section A: Steve Guerriero
Time: Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday,
June 4, 5, & 6, 8:30 am – 5:45 pm
Maximum: 18
(4 seats reserved for O&M students,
(1 seat reserved for Science Ed student)
Credits: 2


ESP 599
Land Protection and Stewardship

Competency Areas: RMC – ESP elective; EE – EE Methods Req Alt, CB, EAO, Cert, IND – Elective

This course is designed to provide students with an exposure to all aspects of land protection transactions. Emphasis will be placed on providing a context for land protection, developing an understanding of the tools of the trade, tax benefits to the landowner, site assessment, developing and completing the real estate transaction, and stewardship of protected lands.

Section A: Pete Throop
Changed 04/16/07 to: Meade Cadot
Changed 05/22/07 to: Meade Cadot & Barbara Richter
Time: Saturdays & Sundays,
June 16 & 17 and July 7 & 8,
8:30 am – 4:30 pm
Maximum: 16
Credits: 2


ES 699A
Master’s Project

Competency areas: CB, RMC & IND – Required for students who are not doing a Master’s Thesis; EAO, EE & Cert – Optional, Elective

The Master’s Project represents the culmination of a student’s work at Antioch. It differs from the Master’s Thesis in that the Project will typically be more descriptive or applied in focus, and usually will not be defined by formal hypothesis-testing of theoretical concepts. The Master’s Project will often follow standardized approaches used in a student’s chosen field such as development of a regional landuse plan, preparation of a natural resource inventory, or authorship of a high school curriculum. Although not to the extent expected for a Thesis, students will be expected to research, develop and defend the methodological approach used in the project. Master’s Projects will be expected to be professional in their presentation, but need not adhere to Antioch’s formal Thesis Guidelines. The goals, content and format of the Master’s Project must be approved by the student’s program director and the ES Department faculty member who has agreed to evaluate the final document; supervision of the Project may involve a qualified person external to the department, or an ES Department faculty member.

Note: CB, RMC and IND students are required to complete either a Masters Project or a Master’s Thesis. Master’s Projects are expected to be completed and submitted for evaluation by the end of the semester it is registered for. A maximum of one second extension may be granted to complete the project. See the AUNE Student Handbook or Second Extension form for each semester’s deadlines.

Section A: Michael Simpson
Section B: Jon Atwood
Section C: Joy Ackerman
Maximum: 15 per section
Credits: 3


ES 699C
Master’s Thesis

Competency areas: CB, RMC & IND – Required for all students doing a Master’s Thesis.
Prerequisite: Master’s Thesis Seminar and written permission from the thesis advisor attached to or on the registration form.

It is recommended that students register for Master’s Thesis in their 5th semester.

Section A: Jon Atwood
Section B: Rachel Thiet
Section C: Peter Palmiotto
Section D: Tom Wessels
Section E: Michael Simpson
Section F: Joy Ackerman
Section G: Jim Jordan
Maximum: 5 per section
Credits: 3


ES 699D
Master’s Thesis Continuation

Required for all students continuing a Master’s Thesis for which they have previously registered.

Students must register for Master’s Thesis Continuation every semester until the thesis has been completed and signed off by your Master’s Thesis reader. Enrollment in Master’s Thesis continuation confers half-time status for Financial Aid and loan deferment purposes through July 22.

Section A: ES Faculty
Maximum: 20
Credits: uncredited


ESF 556
Natural History and Ecology of Small Mammals

CLASS CANCELLED 05/22/07

Competency Areas: Natural Communities elective

This course will discuss identification, natural history, behavior, ecology, and conservation of small mammals. Adaptations enhancing survivorship of terrestrial small mammals and bats in northern environments will be emphasized. Students will conduct live-trapping, mark-recapture, fluorescent pigment tracing, and radio-telemetry techniques to monitor activity and habitat selection of small mammals in southern New Hampshire. A field research project will be conducted by each student. Students should bring camping gear, food, drinks, snacks, a head lamp with extra batteries, a folding chair, and leather gloves.

Section A: Paul Moosman
Time: Pre-Class meeting Friday, June 8,
6:00 – 9:00 pm (at Antioch) and
Saturday – Wednesday, June 16 – 20,
7:00 – 10:00 am and 4:00 pm – 12:00 am
Location: Harris Center
Maximum: 16
(1 seat reserved for Science Ed student)
Credits: 2


ES 693
Practicum, General

Competency Area: CB, EAO, EE, Cert, IND & RMC – Required

A total of 8 Practicum credits are REQUIRED for all Conservation Biology, Environmental Education, Environmental Advocacy, Individualized and RMC majors. A total of 2 General Practicum credits are REQUIRED for Certification majors. It is strongly RECOMMENDED that students not register for Practicum until their third semester in the program. NOTE: Students must register for a minimum of one 4 credit practicum during their course of study.

The Practicum provides students with an opportunity to apply, in an organizational setting, what they are learning and to develop professional contacts within their fields of interest. While students are responsible for locating practica, faculty are available to provide support and information as needed. All students are required to attend a scheduled PRACTICUM ORIENTATION during their first semester.
Note: Seminars are not required for the summer session; however, one seminar is highly recommended for students for whom this is the first practicum, either on Thursday, June 7 or Friday, June 8. The seminars will be held 12:30 to 1:15, and will take the place of one of the interim reports required in the summer.

Section A: Sarah Bockus
Section B: Paul Bocko
Section C: Jack Calhoun
Section D: Duncan Watson
Section E: Sue Weller
Changed 05/22/07 to: Section E: Steve Chase
Section F: Kay Delanoy
Maximum: 15 per section
Changed 05/01/07 to:
Section A: Maximum 8
Section B: Maximum 15
Section C: Maximum 10
Section D: Maximum 9
Section E: Maximum 10
Section F: Maximum 15

Credits: variable


ES 695
Research Practicum

Competency Area: CB, RMC, and IND – Practicum option
Restricted to CB, RMC, and IND students doing a masters thesis and who are doing thesis research as their practicum
Students may register for 2 or 4 credits which will count toward the total of 8 Practicum credits.

Students must have written permission from thesis advisor attached to or on registration form to sign up for this practicum.

Note: There is no formal seminar for this practicum, however the student is expected to meet regularly with their thesis advisor.

Section A: Jon Atwood
Section B: Rachel Thiet
Section C: Peter Palmiotto
Section D: Tom Wessels
Section E: Michael Simpson
Section F: Joy Ackerman
Section G: Jim Jordan
Section added 06/21/07: Section H: Tom Webler
Maximum: 5 per section
Credits: variable


ES 690
SIS: Supervised Individual Study

If you are planning an independent study, please register for an SIS on your registration form. However, an SIS contract must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office by July 10, 2007 in order for it to appear on your schedule or transcript. Please be sure to specify on the contract if the SIS will be used to fulfill a competency area or serve as a required course substitute, or as an elective. Contracts received after the July 10th deadline will be returned and registration required in the subsequent semester (additional costs may apply). Credits will not appear on your schedule until the SIS contract(s) has been submitted to the Registrar’s Office, thus affecting your enrollment status and perhaps your financial aid eligibility.

Credits: variable


ESF 517
Soils: Mapping and Interpretation

Competency Areas: CB, EAO, EE, Cert, RMC & IND – Natural Communities Elective
Priority to RMC students.

This course focuses on soil-landscape relationships and the applications of soil science to land use and management issues. We will investigate soil formation processes in the context of geomorphic setting, the influence of soils on land use patterns and natural vegetation, and will assess soil classification and mapping conventions employed by the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service. Students will become familiar with state and federal standards for best use practices of soils and will map the dominant properties and distributions of soils at parcel to landscape scales.

Section A: Jim Jordan
Times: Saturday – Tuesday, June 9 – 12
8:30 am – 4:30 pm
Maximum: 14
Credits: 2


ESS 520
Wetland Delineation and Evaluation

Competency Areas: EAO, CB, EE, Cert, IND & RMC – Elective
Prerequisites: Wetlands Ecology and NRI – Veg, or Soils Mapping and Interpretation, or Wetlands Flora or New England Flora

Whether you are planning to be a regional/local wetlands administrator, serve on your local conservation commission or more formally perform or evaluate work in or adjacent to wetlands, this course will provide you with the field skills and experience from which to build your reputation in the wetlands arena. The course will utilize the 1987 US Army Corps of Engineers wetlands delineation methodology. This is the currently preferred methodology for those seeking to become a ‘certified’ wetlands scientist. The course will also review methodologies for wetlands assessment including the NH Method for Evaluating Non-Tidal Wetlands and the Army Corps’s Highway Methodology. Students will work in teams to field test such methodologies at the scale of a micro-watershed.

Prerequisites for this course are: wetlands ecology and watershed science or watershed assessment techniques or hydrology. In addition, students need to have successfully completed one of the following courses: vegetation/soils module of the natural resource inventory courses (NRI), soils: mapping and interpretation, wetlands flora or New England Flora.

Section A: Michael Simpson
Time: July 21& 22 Lake Sunapee Watershed, and
July 19, 20, & 23 Antioch & vicinity,
9:00 am – 4:00 pm
Maximum: 14
Credits: 2


ESF 541A
Wetlands Ecology

Competency Areas: Natural Communities Elective

Human impacts on wetlands continue to reduce the global area of these precious aquatic ecosystems at an alarming rate. What makes a wetland valuable? What ecological functions do wetlands perform for human and non-human communities? How do we assess wetland functioning from an ecological standpoint? In this course, we will explore the ecological relationships among various components of wetland systems, including vascular plants, the physical and biological properties of hydric soils, and wildlife. Particular emphasis will be on plant and soil relationships, and we will ground our exploration in the relationship between wetland ecosystem structure, biogeochemical cycling, and ecosystem function. Course time will combine lectures, discussions, lab activities, and field trips.

Section A: Rachel Thiet
Time: Thursdays, June 7 – July 12,
8:30 am – 12:30 pm
Maximum: 16
Credits: 2


CLASS CANCELLED 05/22/07

ESF 521
Wetlands Flora

Competency Areas: Natural Communities II

This course instructs the student in the identification of plants that serve as wetland indicators – the hydrophytes. Lab and field sessions will utilize local wetlands to learn the classification of wetland types in our area. Dominant indicators of common wetland plant types will be discussed among the approximate 200 species of common woody and non-woody plants that will be covered. Wetlands delineation methodologies will be discussed and practiced in the field utilizing these plants as one of the three standard indicators of a wetland. Students will be required to prepare a plant collection and demonstrate proficiency in field identification of wetlands flora. Boots are essential!

Section A: TBA
Time: TBA
Maximum: 16
(1 seat reserved for Science Ed student)
Credits: 2


ESS 579
Wildlife Research Techniques

Competency Areas: CB – Required Alternate; EAO, EE, Cert, IND & RMA – Elective
Priority to first year Conservation Biology students
Prerequisites: Natural Resource Inventory-Wildlife or written permission of instructor attached to or on registration form

The objectives of this course are for students to become familiar with the methodology, benefits, and challenges of conducting field studies of wildlife species, emphasizing terrestrial vertebrates, but also including terrestrial arthropods. Building on information presented during NRI-Wildlife, Wildlife Research Techniques will allow students to practice various field methods including fixed and variable radius point counts, bird-banding, territory mapping (including radio telemetry), behavioral observations, focal species surveys, capture-recapture techniques with birds and small mammals, pitfall arrays for sampling herps, use of cameras and track plates at bait stations, and collection and maintenance of voucher specimens. Most activities will be conducted in, or near, Pisgah State Park, or along the Ashuelot River in Keene.

Pre-class reading assignments and exercises will be distributed by May 28. To mimic an actual field expedition, the class will be run as an intensive for 6 days (Monday – Wed, June 4- 6 and June 11- 13). Field work will begin on most days at 5:30 am and be completed by 3:00 pm; several night-time activities will also take place. The final class meeting will be on Wednesday, June 13 (8-11 am), when project assignments will be due; this means that some afternoons and evenings during the class period will require work on data entry, analysis, and writing. In addition to the rigors associated with successive early mornings and long days, students should anticipate annoyingly large numbers of mosquitoes and black flies.

Section A: Jon Atwood
Time: Mondays – Wednesdays, June 4 – 6 and
June 11 – 13, 5:30 am – 3:00 pm.
*Monday, June 4 and Wednesday, June 13
class will run from 8:30 – 11:00 am
Maximum: 16
Credits: 2


Department of Environmental Studies – Doctoral Program (Ph.D) Courses


ES 775
Candidacy Continuation

Competency Area: Dissertation Process
Restricted to students who have completed three years of the program, but have not completed their Service Project, Integrated Essay, AND Dissertation Proposal.

The Candidacy Continuation semester is designed for students who need additional time to complete their doctoral candidacy projects. Students retain full access to faculty and all student resources at Antioch. During this semester they continue to work independently with their advisor and the rest of the faculty as needed to complete their service project, integrated essay, and doctoral dissertation proposal. Students may schedule their Dissertation Proposal Review meeting during this candidacy continuation semester.

Registration in Candidacy Continuation will carry half-time status for loan deferment and Financial Aid purposes.

Section A: Thomas Webler
Maximum: 15
Credits: uncredited


ES 776
Dissertation Seminar

Competency Area: Dissertation Process
Restricted to Ph.D. IV students.
Prerequisites: Completion of Integrated Essay, Service Project and Dissertation Proposal

This year-long seminar is designed to provide support and consultation for students in the process of formulating and carrying out their doctoral dissertation research. Topics to be addressed during the year include: ongoing evaluation and assessment of research methods, research ethics, dilemmas of working in the field, analysis, writing the dissertation, making formal presentations, dissemination of research results, and transformations you experience in your growth as a scholar. Students along with the instructors are intended to serve as a peer community, providing support, advice and critique. Each semester, students will make a formal presentation to the class documenting the current state of their research and bringing to the class the expertise they have developed. Additional faculty may be brought in as needed to provide input in special topic areas.

Section A: Rob Baldwin
Times: Wednesday – Saturday,
June 13 – 16, 8:00 am – 12:00 pm and
an additional afternoon class scheduled for
Friday, June 15, 2:00 – 6:00 pm
Note: Wednesday, June 13 class will begin at 9:00 am.
Additional contact hours will be
met by specific coursework designed
to be completed on-line.
Maximum: 15
Credits: 4


ES 899
Doctoral Dissertation

Competency Area: Dissertation Process
Restricted to Ph.D. IV students.

Students who are actively engaged in writing the doctoral dissertation are required to register for these credits. You cannot register for this class unless your dissertation proposal has been approved by your committee.

Section A: Thomas Webler
Maximum: 15
Credits: 4


ES 899C
Doctoral Dissertation Continuation

Competency Area: Dissertation Process
Restricted to Ph.D. V+ who have registered for three semesters of (ES 776) Dissertation Seminar and two semesters of (ES 899) Doctoral Dissertation, and have not completed the dissertation.

Section A: Doctoral Faculty
Maximum: 15
Credits: uncredited


ES 700
Ecological Thought

Competency Area: Foundation
Restricted to Ph.D. I students.

The course is organized on the premise that there is an emerging ecological worldview that is the foundation of academic environmental studies, professional environmental practice, and the contemporary environmental movement. This worldview transcends the domain of environmentalism per se, and is influential in a range of disciplines, professions and dimensions of public life. This course explores the dynamics of its emergence, by attending to three interconnected conceptual sets: ecology, nature and life (systems thinking, ecological thinking, evolutionary thought), power, place and space (power relations, natural resource transformation, globalization, the commons, paradigms of activism, environmental movements), and meaning, purpose, and identity (ecopsychology and ecospirituality, literary expression, perception and language, story and myth, and ecological identity). Students will have the opportunity to explore the intellectual roots of their own ecological worldview and to assess a specific intellectual direction of interest.

Section A: Mitchell Thomashow
Changed 04/16/07 to: Mitch Thomashow & Joy Ackerman
Time: Thursday – Saturday, June 14 – 16
2:00 – 6:00 pm and
Monday – Friday, June 18 – 22,
8:00 am – 12:00 pm
No class Sunday, June 17.
Additional contact hours will be
met by specific coursework designed
to be completed on-line.
Maximum: 15
Credits: 3


ES 707
Introduction to Research Design

Competency Area: Foundation
Restricted to Ph.D. I students.

The purpose of this course is to become familiar with a variety of research paradigms and to study the different lenses that they provide for viewing and understanding the world, and in particular, the physical environment. Within paradigms, you will try out different methodological approaches, such as surveys, in-depth interviews, case studies, and quasi experiments. Through the development of a research proposal, you will ground discussions of theory in the practical concerns of research: framing research questions; designing a study; collecting and analyzing data; dealing with validity, reliability, and ethical issues; and writing a research report.

Section A: Dan Smith
Time: Wednesday, June 13, 2:00 – 6:00 pm,
Thursday – Saturday, June 14 – 16,
8:00 am – 12:00 pm and
Monday – Thursday, June 18 – 21,
2:00 – 6:00 pm
Additional contact hours will be
met by specific coursework designed to
be completed on-line.
Maximum: 15
Credits: 3


ES 726
Learning Domain and Environmental Leadership I

Competency Area: Research Strategies and Learning Domains
Restricted to Ph.D. II students.

A series of lectures and workshops in this course are designed to provide students with the intellectual depth and research tools to define their learning domain. The students will engage in library research to fill out their individual knowledge maps, and the attendant literature on theoretical and applied dimensions of the thought collectives, theories, research applications and controversies associated with the learning domain. Students will discuss their work with leading scholars and writers and learn how others set the framework for and carry out their research. By the end of the course, students will have produced a blueprint to guide their learning through the coming year.

Section A: Alesia Maltz
Time: Wednesday – Saturday, June 13 – 16,
8:00 am – 12:00 pm and
Monday – Thursday, June 18 – 21,
2:00 – 6:00 pm
Note: Wednesday, June 13 class will begin at 9:00 am.
Additional contact hours will be
met by specific course work designed to
be completed on-line.
Maximum: 15
Credits: 3


ES 727
Research Strategy: Theory, Method and Design I

Competency Area: Research Strategies and Learning Domains
Restricted to Ph.D. II students.

The emphasis during this semester of this two-part course is on how to interpret and evaluate positivist research studies. Positive research is by far the dominant paradigm of research in science today. By drawing upon published empirical research, students will learn firsthand how to dissect research studies to identify their shortcomings and strengths. Applications will come from social and natural sciences. Attention will be given to defining variables, designing experiments, and interpreting statistical analyses. Research ethics will be discussed. Students will be expected to write a literature review comparing and evaluating several similar research studies.

Section A: Thomas Webler
Time: Wednesday – Saturday, June 13 – 16,
2:00 – 6:00 pm, and
Monday – Friday, June 18 – 22,
8:00 am – 12:00 pm
Additional contact hours will be
met by specific coursework designed to
be completed on-line.
Maximum: 15
Credits: 3


ES 752
Service Project

Competency Area: Integrated Projects
Restricted to Ph.D. III students.

The Service Project is an intensive practicum project that involves a form of environmental or social service in a community context. The project may occur at any time during the third year of the program. Students should register for Service Project during the semester in which the bulk of the work will be done. For more specific information about the service project, please see the Doctoral Program Guide.

Section A: Heidi Watts
Maximum: 15
Time: To be arranged with instructor
Credits: 4


ES 890
SIS: Supervised Individual Study

If you are planning an independent study, please register for a SIS on your registration form. However, an SIS contract must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office by July 10, 2007 in order for it to appear on your schedule or transcript. Please be sure to specify on the contract if the SIS will be used to fulfill a competency area or serve as a required course substitute, or as an elective. Contracts received after the July 10th deadline will be returned to you for registration in a subsequent semester (additional costs may apply). Credits will not appear on your schedule until the SIS contract(s) has been submitted to the Registrar’s Office, thus affecting your enrollment status and perhaps your financial aid eligibility.

Credits: variable


ES 751
Theory and Practice Seminar I

Competency Area: Integrated Projects
Restricted to Ph.D. III students.

The seminar emphasizes the preparatory work necessary for both the Integrated Essay and the Service Project. For the Integrated Essay, students lay the groundwork for the essay. As preparation for the seminar, students compile a topographic map. This serves two functions. First, it allows for a synthesis of the seminal themes of the learning domain, specifically addressing the key theoretical approaches and directions. Second, it delineates the convergence among those approaches, posing questions for further inquiry. By the end of the session, students will compile an outline, describing the dimensions of the essay.

For the Service Project, students propose and develop their goals and objectives, considering the moral and ethical dimensions of their work. In what ways does the project provide a necessary service? Who serves to benefit from the project? Where does the scholar/practitioner fit? By the end of the session, students will complete a brief proposal, outlining the dimensions of the project. In addition, the seminar poses questions regarding the political and spiritual dimensions of service learning, with selected readings about the philosophy of service.

Section A: Heidi Watts and Joy Ackerman
Changed 06/21/07 to: Heidi Watts, Joy Ackerman and Fred Taylor
Times: Wednesday, June 13, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm,
Thursday, June 14,
8:00 am – 12:00 pm and 2:00 – 6:00 pm,
Saturday, June 16, 8:00 am – 12:00 pm and
Monday, Wednesday & Friday, June 18, 20 & 22,
8:00 am – 12:00 pm
Additional contact hours will be
met by specific coursework designed to be
completed on-line.
Maximum: 15
Credits: 3