Clinical Psychology Courses Spring 2007

PY 898
Advanced Practicum

An optional Practicum for fourth year students wishing to have extensive further clinical training for more than 12 hours per week, with a minimum of 300 hours per semester.

Section A: Lorraine Mangione
Credits: 3


PY 856A
Advanced Seminar: Aftermath & Treatment of Trauma

Competency Area: Clinical Techniques and Methods/Interventions
Restricted to Year III & Year IV students.
Priority to Year IV students.

The psychological sequelae of traumatic events and their resolution will be the focus of this course. This will be illustrated using a four-stage model: victimization, aftermath, integration, and full recovery. Specific trauma-related disorders will be covered, including simple and complex PTSD. The trauma literature will be examined through a psychohistorical lens.

Section A: Elaine Campbell
Time: Mondays, 4:30 – 7:00 pm
Maximum: 12
Credits: 3


PYC 717
Advanced Seminar: Assessment and Treatment of Couples

COURSE CANCELLED 12/22/06
Competency Area: Clinical Techniques and Methods/Interventions
Restricted to Year IV students.

This course surveys the predominant approaches to couple/marital therapy as well as the body of empirical findings on successful relationships that have implications for treatment. Modifications of couple therapy to address specific problems such as depression, alcoholism, and sexual dysfunction will be considered. In addition, special issues relevant to couple therapy, including assessment, parenting, infidelity and forgiveness, separation/divorce, domestic violence, and working with diversity will be covered.

Section A: David Arbeitman
Time: Mondays, 9:00 -11:00 am
Maximum: 12
Credits: 3


PY 820A
Advanced Seminar:Brief Psychotherapy

Competency Area: Clinical Techniques and Methods/Interventions
Restricted to Year III & Year IV students.
Priority to Year IV students.

Pragmatic and humanitarian rationales for brief treatment are provided by reviews of psychotherapy utilization, outcome, and process research as well as consideration of its relationship to national health care. Approaches derived from a variety of theoretical orientations are surveyed. The elements common to these are identified and presented as a transtheoretical approach to therapy which can be used from all orientations. Cases are used to illustrate strategy and techniques.

Section A: Jim Fauth
Time: Mondays, 4:30 – 7:00 pm
Maximum: 12
Credits: 3


PYB 711
Advanced Seminar: Clinical Neuropsychology

Competency Area: Biological Bases of Behavior
Restricted to Year III & Year IV students.
Priority to Year IV students.
Prerequisite: Methods of Psychological Assessment I and II
Up to two Special Students may be accommodated, by written permission of the Director of Student Affairs, if space is available.

This seminar examines the structure and function of the central nervous system, brain-behavior relationships, and neuropathology. Seminar content focuses on evaluation techniques for diagnosis of brain dysfunction including visual, auditory, memory, and language processes. Application of these techniques to the development of remedial strategies for learning disabilities and adult dysfunctions is addressed.

Section A: Richard Toye
Time: Mondays, 4:30 – 7:00 pm
Maximum: 12
Credits: 3


PYS 701
Advanced Seminar: Countertransference and Supervision

COURSE ADDED 12/22/06
Competency Area: Management and Supervision

This advanced seminar focuses on the use of countertransference in the supervisory experience. The seminar considers issues of containment and safety, unconscious communication, the action of supervision, and the use of the group. The seminar will involve an active exploration of conceptual material as manifested in clinical cases. The seminar is specifically designed to offer students an opportunity to inform and further develop their practice as psychotherapists and supervisors.

Section A: Colby Smith
Time: Mondays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 12
Credits: 3


PYI 705
Advanced Seminar: Forensic Psychology

Competency Area: Effective Interventions
Restricted to Year IV students.

This seminar focuses on the practice of forensic psychology with an emphasis on the context for a relationship between the law and behavioral sciences. Following a general overview of the legal and court systems, including the history and role of mental health experts in the judiciary, this seminar focuses on six primary ways that clinical psychologists provide services to legal professionals: competency in the clinical process, mental status at the time of the offense, sentencing and rehabilitation, civil commitment and civil competencies, compensation for mental or emotional injuries, children and families, and juvenile justice. With each of these venues, students learn how to appreciate the relevant legal issues and to better communicate important psychological findings to courts and legal professionals.

Section A: William Halikias
Time: Mondays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 12
Credits: 3


PY 719
Advanced Seminar: Health Psychology

Competency Area: Biological Bases of Behavior
Restricted to Year III & Year IV students.
Priority to Year IV students.
Up to two Special Students may be accommodated, by written permission of the Director of Student Affairs, if space is available.

This course provides an overview of the emerging field of clinical health psychology and behavioral medicine. There will be a focus on the delivery of clinical services in an interdisciplinary healthcare setting, with an emphasis on the role of the psychologist as consultant to a variety of medical subspecialties. Topics to be reviewed include the psychophysiology of stress, the stress-illness connection, psychoneuroimmunology, the psychology of pain, treatment adherence, and psychosocial variables in chronic health conditions. In addition, the factors mediating the health-illness continuum will be examined, with particular emphasis on the psychology of wellness. Students are introduced to various tools of the trade, including biofeedback, relaxation training, meditation, clinical hypnosis, and psychophysiological psychotherapy.

Section A: Victor Pantesco
Time: Mondays, 4:30 – 7:00 pm
Maximum: 12
Credits: 3


PY 816F
Advanced Seminar: Psychological Assessment: Evaluations For Clinics, Schools, and Courts

Competency Area: Clinical Techniques and Methods/Interventions
Restricted to Year III & Year IV students who have completed Methods of Psychological Assessment I and II and have at least one year psychological assessment experience. Basic familiarity with the Wechsler scales and the Rorschach test (Comprehensive System) is MANDATORY.
Priority to Year IV students. Up to two Special Students may be accommodated, by written permission of the Director of Student Affairs, if space is available.

This course explores the meaning of clinical inference as it relates to the assessment enterprise. Psychological assessment is the development of diagnostic meaning from a person’s history, clinical interviews, observations, records, and psychological tests. The ability to obtain, shape, integrate, and ultimately export meaningful information about an individual is the basis of psychological assessment. Test instruments used to model the idea of test-buttressed opinions combined with other data include the Wechsler scales, Rorschach test (Comprehensive System), and MMPI-2. Other tests are discussed in the context of specific assessment activities. This class explores the assessment enterprise with clinics and for mental health professionals, in schools for learning and emotional difficulties, and for courts around forensic evaluations. With each of these tests and assessment contexts, students learn to better analyze and integrate complex information, applying this data skillfully to various systems.

Section A: William Halikias
Time: Mondays, 4:30 – 7:00 pm
Maximum: 12
Credits: 3


PYC 710
Advanced Seminar: Substance Abuse Theory and Practice

CLASS CANCELLED 01/10/07

Competency Area: Clinical Techniques and Methods/Interventions
Restricted to Year III and Year IV students.
Priority to Year IV students.

Substance abuse treatment is a critical and common clinical issue, with increasing numbers seeking inpatient and outpatient treatment. Even those entering psychological treatment for other presenting problems often have substance abuse issues that complicate their clinical presentation. This course goes into greater detail on topics overviewed in the one-credit substance abuse workshop. The course will help students expand their knowledge of current research and effective assessment strategies. Biological effects and neuropsychological syndromes and disorders related to substance abuse will be included. 12-step, psychoanalytic, cognitive/behavioral; marital family, pharmacologic, and motivational conceptualizations and models of treatment will be covered, with an emphasis on evidence-based intervention strategies. Students will develop the clinical knowledge and skills for effective work with this population.

Section A: David Hamolsky
Time: Mondays, 4:30 – 7:30 pm
Time corrected 11/30/06: Mondays, 4:30 – 7:00 pm
Maximum: 12
Credits: 3


PY 885A
Case Conference II
PY 893
Practicum

Required of and Restricted to Year III students.

This is a continuation of Case Conference I. The clinical aspect of the Qualifying Examination takes place in the context of this course. During this semester there is also an opportunity to work on conceptual and personal issues stimulated by the Qualifying Exam.

Section A: Barbara Belcher-Timme
Section B: David Junno
Section C: Jim Fauth
Section D: Mick Foot
Section E: Martha B. Straus
(Section assignments will be made by the department)
Time: Mondays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 8 per section
Credits: 3 and 3


PY 714
Clinical Psychopharmacology

Competency Area: Biological Bases of Behavior
Prerequisite: PY 710 Biological Foundations of Clinical Psychology
Priority to Year IV students.

This weekend course will focus on the clinical uses of psychotropic medications in the treatment of affective disorders, psychotic disorders and anxiety disorders. The mechanisms by which abused substances affect the body and drugs used in the treatment of substance abuse disorders will also be covered. The basic biology underlying these disorders will be presented as part of the discussion of the therapeutic mechanisms of drug action.

Section A: Douglas Hoffman
Time: Saturday & Sunday, April 28 & 29,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Changed 03/19/07 to:
Time: Saturday & Sunday, April 21 & 22, 9 am – 5 pm

Maximum: 20
Credits: 1


PY 812B
Consultation: Theory and Practice II

Competency Area: Clinical Techniques and Methods/Interventions
Required of and Restricted to Year III students who took PY 812A Consultation: Theory and Practice I.

This weekend course examines the role of psychologists as consultants in mental health settings and in the community. A variety of consulting experiences is explored including case consultation, participation in interdisciplinary teams, and the psychologist as expert in dealing with diverse individuals, groups and organizations. The course examines issues of contacting, data gathering, diagnosis, intervention, evaluation and follow-up. Implications of the consultant’s role in education, training and organizational development are addressed. Participants have the opportunity to apply consultation skills in experiential exercises and also examine the possible consultancy aspect of their practicum role. This course is a continuation of Consultation: Theory and Practice I.

Section A: Ted Ellenhorn
Time: Saturday & Sunday, February 17 & 18,
9:00 am- 5:00 pm
Maximum: 25
Credits: 1


PY 899
Doctoral Dissertation

Year V+ students who have not yet begun or have already completed 2,000 hours of internship, need register for only PY 899, Doctoral Dissertation. Students must be registered for Doctoral Dissertation in the semester during which they complete Final Orals. Students who anticipate completing Final Orals during their fourth year MUST register for the Dissertation in the semester in which the Orals take place. Students must continue to register each semester until the dissertation is deposited.

Section A: George Tremblay
Credits: uncredited


PYR 876
Doctoral Research Seminar II

Competency Area: Research and Inquiry
Required of and Restricted to Year III students.

This course is a continuation of Doctoral Research Seminar I.

Section A: Kathi Borden
Section B: Ted Ellenhorn
Section C: James Fauth
Section D: Susan Hawes
Section E: Vic Pantesco
Section F: Roger Peterson
Section G: Gargi Roysircar
Section H: Colborn Smith
Section I: Martha B. Straus
Section J: George Tremblay
(Section assignments will be made by the department)
Time: Mondays, 1:00 – 3:30 pm
(5 weeks: February 12, March 5 & 19, April 9 & 16)
Maximum: 5 per section
Credits: 1


PYR 878
Doctoral Research Seminar IV

Competency Area: Research and Inquiry
Required of and Restricted to Year IV students.

This course is a continuation of Doctoral Research Seminar III.

Section A: Kathi Borden
Section B: Ted Ellenhorn
Section C: Jim Fauth
Section D: Susan Hawes
Section E: Vic Pantesco
Section F: Roger Peterson
Section G: Gargi Roysircar
Section H: Colby Smith
Section I: Martha B. Straus
Section J: George Tremblay
(Section assignments will be made by the department)
Time: Mondays, 1:00 – 3:30 pm
(10 weeks: January 22 & 29;
February 5, 19 & 26; March 26;
April 2, 23 & 30; May 7)
Maximum: 5 per section
Credits: 2


PYC 730
The Dream in Clinical Practice

Competency Area: Clinical Techniques and Methods/Interventions

This weekend course explores the use of dreams in clinical work from a variety of perspectives. Cultural and historical perspectives on dreams, dreamers, and dream interpreters will be discussed. Empirical human and animal dream studies and contemporary neurophysiological research will be reviewed. From a psychodynamic view, we will consider dreams as diagnostic indicators of psychic structure and content, facilitators of deeper and more authentic communication, as objects of mutual exploration, as retreats and advances, as well as serving as the “royal road to the unconscious.” Participants will be asked to bring in dream specimens from a variety of sources: literature, film and television, clients, and their own.

Section A: Ted Ellenhorn
Time: Saturday & Sunday, January 27 & 28,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 20
Credits: 1


PY 859C
Fundamental Clinical Skills II

Competency Area: Relationship
Required of and Restricted to Year I students.

This weekend course focuses on the application of the basic relationship skills to specific clinical contexts. It is designed as a continuation of the Fundamental Clinical Skills I course and includes the initial interview (i.e., history taking, the mental status exam, and problem assessment), lethality assessment, and crisis intervention. This course involves practice in interviewing and practicing in specific clinical contexts.

Sections A & B: David Junno
Time: Section A: Saturday & Sunday,
February 10 & 11,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Time: Section B: Saturday & Sunday,
February 24 & 25,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 15 per section
Credits: 1


PY 777B
Human Diversity and the Clinical Enterprise

Competency Area: Social Bases of Behavior
Required of and Restricted to Year I students.

This course utilizes principles and concepts of multicultural and cross-cultural psychology to attempt to acquire an increased understanding of diverse under-represented groups, with an emphasis on understanding racism, sexism, heterosexism, classism, and ageism. It utilizes the multicultural competencies perspective to facilitate learning how to perform effective clinical work with individuals who are of different cultures, ethnicities, genders, sexual orientations, socioeconomic status, ages, ability, religion, and spirituality.

Sections A & B: Gargi Roysircar
Time: Section A: Tuesdays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Time: Section B: Tuesdays, 1:00 – 3:30 pm
(Section assignments will be made by the department)
Maximum: 15 per section
Credits: 3


PY 718A
Human Sexuality and Sex Therapy

Competency Area: Clinical Techniques and Methods/Interventions
Prerequisite: Reading assignments, available from the bookstore, are to be completed prior to the start of the workshop.

Nearly every client welcomes the chance to be more comfortable and satisfied with his or her sex life. Designed for those new to working with sex-related problems, the focus of this weekend course is on the pragmatic: understanding the theoretical underpinning of sexual disorders; clarifying one’s own sexual attitudes, feelings, and preferences; using sexual language comfortably; offering permission; dispelling myths, and understanding how and when to offer specific suggestions. Theoretically, the course primarily takes a cognitive-behavioral perspective, but family systems, Ericksonian and object relations theories will also be applied as pertinent. Given the practical skills-building focus, participants spend a significant portion of their time interacting in class discussions and experiential exercises, and in self-examination through in-class journal writing. Please be advised that this workshop contains sexually explicit language and media presentations.

Section A: Kathy McMahon
Time: Saturday & Sunday, April 21 & 22
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 20
Credits: 1


PY 896
Internship (Year IV students)
PY 897
Internship (Year V+ students)

Prior to graduation, each student must successfully complete an approved internship of 2,000 hours within 24 calendar months which meets the guidelines published by the Association of Psychology and Postdoctoral Internship Centers (APPIC) as well as the Council for the National Register of Health Service Providers in Psychology. Internship may be pursued in several formats: half-time during the fourth and fifth years; full-time during the fifth year, etc. Fourth Year students should register for PY 896, Internship, and Fifth Year + students should register for PY 897, Internship.

Section A: Colborn Smith
Credits: uncredited


PY 816
Methods of Psychological Assessment II

Competency Area: Clinical Techniques and Methods/Interventions
Required of and Restricted to Year I students who took PY 815 Methods of Psychological Assessment I.

This course continues an introduction to psychological assessment of individuals, with a major focus in the fall on the role of psychological tests in personality assessment, and with attention also paid to psychoeducational and neuropsychological assessment. Students develop beginning competence in the administration, scoring, and interpretation of a standard battery of projective psychodiagnostic techniques in combination with the tests learned in the fall.

Section A: Emily DeFrance
Section B: William Slammon
Time: Mondays, 4:30 – 7:00 pm
(Section assignments will be made by the department)
Maximum: 15 per section
Credits: 3


PY 800
Organizational Issues

Competency Area: Management and Supervision
Required of and Restricted to Year IV students.

This course presents theory, practice, and research applicable to understanding organizational issues. This includes an advanced discussion of the professional psychologist as a change agent in organizational settings. An experiential approach will be utilized in order to create a context for these conversations and to achieve students’ learning objectives. Students will explore infrastructure areas including, but not limited to, management, human resources, training, finance, and quality improvement. Also included in this section are issues involving strategic planning, governing ideas, organizational relationships, nonprofit boards, and leadership. In addition, the course will apply a critique of normative assumptions about organizational behavior, and address issues of diversity in organizations.

Section A: David Hamolsky
Time: Mondays, 1:00 – 3:30 pm
(5 weeks: February 12, March 5 & 19, April 9 & 16)
Maximum: 20
Credits: 1


PY 730
Personality: Theory and Assessment

Competency Area: Individual Behavior and Individual Differences
Required of and Restricted to Year I students.

This course will provide an overview of critical concepts, theory and knowledge about personality structure, dynamics, change and development. Using case examples, the assessment and diagnosis of personality will be explored through the integration of test data, interview, history, and theoretical understanding. The course is designed to facilitate the student’s development of a viewpoint that can be related to treatment issues and concepts of health and maladaptive behavior. Specific theory topics include: drive theory; ego psychology; object relations theory; interpersonal theory; self psychology; social constructivism; biological/evolutionary; and French post-structuralist and feminist perspectives on personality theory. The theories will be examined regarding issues of individual differences and group differences, including differences in culture, gender, sexual orientation, and social and economic class.

Section A: Ted Ellenhorn
Time: Mondays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 30
Credits: 3


PY 881B
Professional Seminar II: Roles of Psychologists and Ethical Issues

Required of and Restricted to Year I students.

This is a continuation of Professional Seminar I: Roles of Psychologists and Ethical Issues.

Section A: Barbara Belcher-Timme
Section B: Sue Quigley
Section C: William Slammon
Section D: David Junno
(Section assignments will be made by the department)
Time: Mondays, 1:00 – 3:30 pm
Maximum: 8 per section
Credits: 3


PY 883B
Professional Seminar IV: Case Conceptualization and Demonstrations
PY 892
Practicum

Required of and Restricted to Year II students.

This is a continuation of Professional Seminar III: Case Conceptualization and Demonstrations.

Section A: David Arbeitman
Section B: Mick Foot
Section C: William Halikias
Section D: Emily DeFrance
(Section assignments will be made by the department)
Time: Mondays, 1:00 – 3:30 pm
Maximum: 8 per section
Credits: 3 and 3


PY 732
Psychological Development

Competency Area: Individual Behavior and Individual Differences
Required of and Restricted to Year II students.

This course approaches behavior in infancy, early childhood, adolescence and adulthood through the framework of a Life Span Developmental theoretical orientation. Classical developmental theories as well as issues in development such as emotional, social, cognitive, and moral growth are examined within this context. The student learns about clinical and theoretical problems in development through required readings and case material.

Section A: Martha B. Straus
Time: Mondays, 4:30 – 7:00 pm
Maximum: 28
Credits: 3


PYC 701
Psychotherapeutic Intervention II: Individual and Family

Competency Area: Clinical Techniques and Methods/Interventions
Required of and Restricted to Year I students who took PYC 700 Psychotherapeutic Intervention I.

This is the second part of the yearlong course on psychotherapeutic intervention in both theory and practice with individual adults, families, and children. The goal is to develop a flexible, integrated style of conducting treatment, focusing on brief to mid-range durations. Emphasis is on psychodynamic, cognitive and systemic thinking, and selected clinical practice and process issues are considered across a variety of psychological disorders. Issues such as the therapist’s role, factors in change, gender effects, and treatment duration and flexibility are evaluated. Methods include readings, discussions, student and instructor presentations, sharing of relevant personal and professional experience, and skill practice.

Section A: Elaine Campbell
Time: Tuesdays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Section B: Martha B. Straus
Time: Tuesdays, 1:00 – 3:30 pm
(Section assignments will be made by the department)
Maximum: 15 per section
Credits: 3


PY 872
Research Methods and Statistics II

Competency Area: Research and Inquiry
Required of and Restricted to Year II students.

This course is a continuation of PY 871 Research Methods and Statistics I

Section A: George Tremblay
Time: Mondays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 28
Credits: 3


PY 703
A Social History of Popular Psychological Discourses

Competency Area: History and Systems of Psychology
Restricted to Year III & Year IV students.

This weekend course examines psychology as one of many modern forms of discourse. Participants will be introduced to some of the ways in which psychology has entered into and contributed to transformations of social relations in modern western cultures. Various discursive media will be explored, including linguistic, artistic, and spatial forms. Particular attention will be paid to popular media, such as 18th century chapbooks, Victorian public lectures and instructional print, self-help publications, and technology.

Section A: Susan Hawes
Time: Saturday & Sunday, April 14 & 15
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 20
Credits: 1


PY 894C
Special Proficiency Practicum

Restricted to Year IV students.

This is a Practicum for Fourth Year students wishing to have further clinical training experience with a specific focus for a minimum of 100 hours per semester.

Section A: Lorraine Mangione
Credits: 1


CLASS ADDED 11/30/06
PYC 729
Sport & Exercise Psychology

Competency Area: Clinical Techniques & Methods/Interventions

This workshop focuses on introducing the student to the exciting and emerging field of Sport and Exercise Psychology. Teacher, researcher, clinician, consultant, and mental coach roles will be presented along with the theoretical underpinnings that provide the foundation for these roles. Another point of emphasis will be what one can do to successfully build a sport and exercise psychology component to one’s professional career. Case examples and demonstrations will be used to demonstrate principles covered in the course.

Section A: Jim Graves
Time: Saturday & Sunday, February 3 & 4, 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 20
Credits: 1


PY 867
Supervised Experience in the Teaching of Clinical Psychology

(For Teaching Assistants of Fundamental Clinical Skills II)
Competency Area: Consultation and Education

This weekend course is restricted to Second, Third, and Fourth Year students and involves supervised teaching within the program. Students conduct background research, prepare material to teach, present the material, supervise small group activities, and grade course assignments, all under the supervision of the primary faculty person. (NOTE: Students who have previously received credit for this course must register for PYE 890E, SIS: Applied Experience in Consultation and Education.)

Sections A & B: David Junno
Time: Section A: Saturday & Sunday,
February 10 & 11, 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Time: Section B: Saturday & Sunday,
February 24 & 25, 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 5
Credits: 1


PY 890
SIS: Supervised Independent Study
PY 890C
SIS: Dissertation Research

The SIS is for students who wish to have a directed learning experience focused on a specific project or area of interest.

Applied Experience SIS Topics:
Often students in Year III & Year IV, who wish to have a directed learning experience of a practical nature focused on a specific project, elect an SIS in an Applied Experience in Clinical Psychology. These Applied Experience SIS are organized according to the NCSPP competency areas and are designed to more clearly reflect applied experience for transcript, licensure, and internship application information. Please be certain to include the title and competency areas on the SIS contract; course numbers will be assigned by the Registrar’s Office.

PYE 890A
SIS: Applied Experience in Relationship Skills
PYE 890B
SIS: Applied Experience in Assessment
PYE 890C
SIS: Applied Experience in Intervention
PYE 890D
SIS: Applied Experience in Research and Evaluation
PYE 890E
SIS: Applied Experience in Consultation and Education
PYE 890F

SIS: Applied Experience in Management and Supervision

Advanced Supervised Study:
The SIS list of Advanced Supervised Study is for Year III and Year IV students who wish to have a directed learning experience in the core knowledge bases of psychology. These Advanced Supervised Study SIS are organized according to the NCSPP educational model requirements and are designed to more clearly reflect advanced study for transcript, licensure, and internship application information.

PYB 890
SIS: Advanced Supervised Study in Biological Bases of Behavior
PY 890A
SIS: Advanced Supervised Study in Cognitive-Affective Bases of Behavior
PY 890R
SIS: Advanced Supervised Study in Dysfunctional Behavior and Pschopathology
PY 890M
SIS: Advanced Supervised Study in Historical and Philosophical Context of Psychology
PYS 890
SIS: Advanced Supervised Study in Social Bases of Behavior

Other suggested SIS: Advanced Supervised Study topics include:

PY 890
SIS: Advanced Supervised Study in Cultural Bases of Behavior
PY 890
SIS: Advanced Supervised Study in Life-span Development
PY 890
SIS: Advanced Supervised Study in Professional Ethics and Standards
PY 890
SIS: Advanced Supervised Study in Psychological Measurement
PY 890
SIS: Advanced Supervised Study in Theories of Individual and Systems Functioning and Change

If you are planning an independent study, please register for an SIS on your registration form. However, an SIS contract must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office by April 20, 2007, in order for it to appear on your schedule or transcript. Please be sure to specify on the contract if the SIS will be used to fulfill a competency area or serve as a required course substitute, or as an elective. Contracts received after the April 20th deadline will be returned to you for registration in a subsequent semester (additional costs may apply). Credits will not appear on your schedule until the SIS contract(s) has been submitted to the Registrar’s Office, thus affecting your enrollment status and perhaps your financial aid eligibility.

Credits: variable


PYS 723
Supervision

Competency Area: Management and Supervision
Required of and Restricted to Year III students.

This course is designed to give students an introduction to supervision that is both didactic and experiential. The course begins with an overview of supervision, including such topics as the purpose and goals of supervision, theoretical models of supervision, roles in supervision, the development of the supervisor and the supervisee, the context of supervision, the evaluative process, the supervisory relationship, issues of diversity in supervision, ethics and supervisory practice, and research on supervision. After exploration and discussion of these areas, students have an opportunity to observe faculty and field supervisors demonstrate supervision in the classroom, as well as practice the role of supervisor in small groups with their peers.

Section A: Lorraine Mangione
Time: Mondays, 1:00 – 3:30 pm
(10 weeks: January 22 & 29;
February 5, 19 & 26; March 26;
April 2, 23 & 30; May 7)
Maximum: 25
Credits: 2


PY 863
Writing Workshop

Competency Area: Elective

This weekend course focuses on developing technical writing skills appropriate for doctoral level psychologists. The content emphasizes APA writing standards for professional reports, papers, dissertations, and general publications. One component of the course will involve hands-on writing exercises. Readings will focus on mastering APA writing style. This course can be repeated for credit.

Section A: Greg Blair
Time: Saturday & Sunday, February 10 & 11,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Changed 03/19/07 to:
Time: Saturday & Sunday, April 14 & 15, 9 am – 5 pm

Maximum: 8
Credits: 1


PY 868
Writing Workshop II

COURSE CANCELLED 03/28/07
Competency Area: Elective
Prerequisite: Completion of Writing Workshop

This weekend course will start where the first Writing Workshop left off. The student shall have the opportunity to learn more detailed information in each of the areas covered by the first Workshop, as well as be introduced to basic concepts of critical analysis (inductive and deductive reasoning, ambiguity and vagueness, testing the validity of an argument, etc.). In addition, the student will learn how to conceptualize, organize, and write his or her dissertation.

Section A: Greg Blair
Time: Saturday & Sunday, March 31 & April 1,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 8
Credits: 1