Applied Psychology Courses Spring 2007


PYI 545
Advanced Assessment and Intervention for Speech-Language Pathologists

Competency Area: Individual Assessment & Intervention Strategies
Retricted to ASD Certificate students; others by written permission of the Program Director attached to or on registration form.
Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the first semester ASD certificate coursework or with permission of the Program Director.

The advanced strand for Speech-Language Pathologists will develop a greater knowledge base in the three deficit areas of Theory of Mind, Central Coherence, and Executive Function. The areas of interactive perspective taking, self-advocacy and disclosure, and compensatory strategies for showing what you know will be explored. Both the paralinguistic aspects and nonverbal aspects of communicative events will be developed as part of the treatment paradigm in teaching these contextually based communication skills. Treatment models for various contexts will be learned and practiced to enhance clinical skills. Students will lead on-campus pragmatic language groups with teens and young adults to practice applications.

Section A: Elsa Abele
Time: Saturdays, January 13, February 3 & 24,
March 24, April 28, and Sunday, May 20,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 10
Credits: 3


PYI 541
Advanced Counseling Interventions for Autism Spectrum Disorders

Competency Area: Individual Assessment & Intervention Strategies
Restricted to ASD Certificate Students; others by written permission of the Program Director attached to or on registration form.
Prerequisite: Must be a licensed professional or student in the counseling/therapy field and have satisfactorily completed the first semester ASD certificate coursework, or with the written permission of the Program Director.

This course both reviews the scientific literature on effective psychotherapy treatments for individuals with spectrum disorders, and provides detailed case studies of successes and failures in treatment. Specific strategies and therapeutic styles, which best accommodate the learning/processing styles of these individuals are reviewed. Opportunities of case review will be an important part of this program.

Section A: Celia Oliver
Time: Saturdays, January 13, February 3 & 24,
March 24, April 28, and Sunday, May 20,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 10
Credits: 3


PYI 546
Advanced Educational Interventions for Autism Spectrum Disorders

Competency Area: Individual Assessment & Intervention Strategies
Restricted to ASD Certificate Students; others by written permission of the Program Director attached to or on registration form.
Prerequisite: Must be a licensed educator, work in an educational setting or be an education student, and have satisfactorily completed the first semester ASD certificate coursework or with written permission of the Program Director.

This course is an advanced study that will address in detail issues touched upon in the one credit overview. Explores and analyzes practical applications for theoretical constructs in development and learning, specifically in reference to Asperger Syndrome and High Functioning Autism. This course will be highly experiential in nature. Participants will have opportunities to develop professional knowledge and research topics relevant to their needs.

Section A: Kathryn Ransom
Time: Saturdays, January 13, February 3 & 24,
March 24, April 28, and Sunday, May 20,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 10
Changed 11/30/06 to: Maximum: 13
Credits: 3


PYI 547
Advanced Psychological Testing, Assessment and Intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorders

Competency Area: Individual Assessment & Intervention Strategies
Restricted to ASD Certificate Students; others by written permission of the Program Director attached to or on registration form.
Prerequisite: Must be a licensed professional or student in the field of psychology and have satisfactorily completed the first semester ASD certificate coursework or with written permission of the Program Director.

This course is designed for psychologists who have extensive experience in evaluating children and adolescents within the school and/or clinical setting. The emphasis will be upon tailoring the evaluation and intervention planning process to students with autism spectrum disorders. Upon completion, the students will be able to utilize specific referral questions in order to develop a neurodevelopmental evaluation process; follow the principles of dynamic, processed-based assessment in order to evaluate at least two students; seek consultation from other professionals as needed; identify strengths and challenges that affect everyday life; create meaningful and functional recommendations; complete a comprehensive report that tells the story of the student.

Section A: Teresa Bolick
Time: Saturdays, January 13, February 3 & 24,
March 24, April 28, and Sunday, May 20,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 8
Credits: 3


PYI 543
Advocacy Applications in the Field of Autism/Asperger’s

Competency Area: Individual Assessment & Intervention Strategies
Restricted to ASD Certificate Students, others by written permission of the Program Director attached to or on registration form.
Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the first semester ASD certificate coursework or with written permission of the Program Director.

This course facilitates understanding of the theoretical constructs of effective advocacy in the field’s of Autism/Asperger’s and the current applications of alternative dispute resolution, legal intervention, political advocacy, and systemic advocacy and self-advocacy, through reading, simulations, and guest discussions.

Section A: Shelley Viles
Section B: Michaelene Pepera Cronin
Time: Sunday, April 29, & Saturday, May 19,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 22
Changed 11/30/06 to: Maximum: 22 per section
Credits: 1


PYI 552
Career and Lifestyle Counseling

(formerly PYC 652, Career/Lifestyle Development)
Competency Area: Individual Assessment & Intervention Strategies
Restricted to CMHC (SA/AC) I/DMT II students; others by written permission of Program Director attached to or on registration form.
Prerequisites: PY 590A, Fundamentals of Therapeutic Interaction and PYB 505, Human Development and Diversity, or equivalent.
Sections A & B: Restricted to Fall 2006 CMHC (SA/AC) I students.
Section C: Priority to DMT II students.

This course will provide both the theoretical foundation and practical experience necessary to understand and foster career/life development in diverse individual and group counseling settings. Topics include career and developmental theories; the elements and evaluation of life careers; administration and interpretation of career-related assessment instruments; and definition of the role, ethics and professional identity within the field of career development.

Section A: Carlotta Willis
Section B: Meg Connor
Section C: Linda Evans
Time: Wednesdays, 1:00 – 3:30 pm
Maximum: 20 per section
Credits: 3


PYB 525
Clinical Applications of Psychopharmacology

Competency Area: Behavioral Science Foundation
Prerequisite: PYB 523, Psychopharmacology for Counselors

This course will prepare counselors to provide services in conjunction with a psychopharmacological prescriber. Content will include the merger of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy, history, efficacy and present standard of care. Ethical and legal issues for the non-medical counselor relating to pharmacotherapy will be covered. Numerous case examples demonstrating appropriate psychopharmacologic management, and strategies for developing a collaborative relationship with the prescriber will be presented.

Section A: Judith Durham
Time: Saturday & Sunday, March 31 & April 1,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 24
Credits: 1


PYI 522
Counseling Skills Lab

Competency Area: Individual Assessment & Intervention Strategies
Required of Fall 2006 CMHC I, CMHC (SA/AC) I
Prerequisite: PY 590A, Fundamentals of Therapeutic Interaction

This course will focus on further enhancement of the technical and conceptual skills of counseling. The course will consist of reflection on the development of the self-in-role and continued application of theory to practice through in-class skills exercises and supervision.

Section A: TBA
Section B: Wendy Elliott
Section C: TBA
Maximum: 12 per section
Time: Wednesdays, 4:00 – 5:30 pm
Credits: 1


PYI 512
Counseling Theories: Models and Approaches

Competency Area: Individual Assessment & Intervention Strategies
Required of and Restricted to CP I, SA/AC I and DMT I students; others by written permission of the Program Director attached to or on registration form.
Prerequisites: PY 590A Fundamentals of Therapeutic Interaction and PYB 505 Human Development & Diversity

The course provides an understanding of the major counseling theories and their application with clients, and their family/cultural/systems contexts. An overview of the evolution and development of the core tenets of counseling and psychotherapy will provide a context for a more extensive examination of the current approaches utilized by mental health counselors in practice settings. These approaches include psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral, interpersonal, and solution-focused models. The course will focus on the theories and practices through didactic presentations, demonstrations and experiential work with the goal of giving class members the tools to function effectively in practica and internships.

Section A: Betsy Taylor
Section B: Katherine Clarke
Section C: Ken Bacon
Time: Tuesdays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 18 per section
Credits: 3


PYC 675
Crisis Intervention: Cognitive Behavioral Approaches

Restricted to CP II students; others by written permission of Program Director attached to or on registration form.
Prerequisite: Completion of all CP I courses and internships

This course will provide an overview to the theory and practice of crisis intervention from a cognitive-behavioral perspective. The variety of crisis situations and the phenomenon of suicide will be examined as well as the roles and responsibilities of counselors in making the interventions. Students will be exposed to a variety of models of counseling under the heading of cognitive-behavioral with the objective of helping the student develop an integrated approach to the range of problems clients present. Members will have the opportunity to present case material to the class.

Section A: David Hamolsky
Time: Tuesdays, 4:00 – 6:30 pm
Maximum: 15
Credits: 3


PY 618A
Dance/Movement Therapy with Adults

Competency Area: Individual Assessment & Intervention Strategies
Required of and Priority to DMT II students. Open to CP II & SA/AC II students as a PYC equivalent; others by written permission of Program Director attached to or on registration form.

This course will present a theoretical and practical framework for in-depth work and brief treatment models in dance/movement therapy with a variety of adult populations. Trauma and addictions recovery models, along with mind-body and object relations frameworks are examined and integrated with KMP, Laban and Body-Mind CenteringTM concepts. Techniques such as somatic countertransference, gestalt work, integrated transformational healing, dramatic improvisational experiments, rechoreography of object relations and authentic movement are explored and experienced.

Section A: Kim Burden
Time: Tuesdays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 20
Credits: 3


PYI 539
Educational Interventions for Autism Spectrum Disorders: Middle, High School and College

Competency Area: Individual Assessment & Intervention Strategies
Required of and Restricted to ASD Certificate students, others by written permission of the Program Director attached to or on registration form.

This course offers a forum for exploration and discussion of the learning issues and concerns specific to older students diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome and High Functioning Autism. The class is designed to provide development of theoretical knowledge/understanding and applied learning to support implementation of best practices methodologies.

Section A: Kathryn Ransom
Section B: Linda Potter
Time: Sundays, January 14 & February 4,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 22 per section
Credits: 1


PYC 666
Family Counseling Approaches To Addictions Treatment

(formerly Family Therapy Approaches to Addictions Treatment)
Required of and Restricted to SA/AC II students; others by written permission of Program Director attached to or on registration form.
Prerequisite: PYC 626, completion of all CP/SA/AC I courses and internships.

This course will provide an understanding of the structure and dynamics of marriage and other committed relationships, and families, and look at a variety of systemic interventions including structural, strategic, and Bowenian approaches. Special attention will be given to understanding of and intervention with shame based family systems including families with addictions, domestic violence and other family problems which require broad based as well as dynamic interventions.

Section A: Diane Kurinsky
Time: Tuesdays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 15
Credits: 3


PY 590A
Fundamentals of Therapeutic Interaction

Competency Area: Individual Assessment & Intervention Strategies
Required of and Priority to Spring 2007entering CMHC (SA/AC) students.

This course is designed to help the beginning mental health professional acquire fundamental counseling skills. Theoretical approaches, including cognitive behavioral, systemic, humanistic, relational, and psychodynamic, will be introduced. Topics include counselor roles and ethics, the dimensions of contemporary mental health practice, and the multicultural counseling perspective. Students will also explore the particular interpersonal dynamics of helping relationships and develop self-in-role awareness. The course balances theory and practical learning through in-class counseling practice.

Section A: Meg Connor
Section B: Tom Barker
Time: Wednesdays, 4:00 – 6:30 pm
Maximum: 15 per section
Credits: 3


PYG 604
Group Dance/Movement Therapy

Competency Area: Group Assessment & Intervention Strategies
Required of and Restricted to DMT I students; others by written permission of Program Director attached to or on registration form.

This course is designed to help students gain a solid theoretical and practical knowledge of group dynamics, group development, and group leadership styles as they pertain to both verbal and dance/movement therapy groups. Students will learn to observe and understand group process on a variety of levels and in relation to different group modalities. The student will have the opportunity to practice group leadership, using core D/MT and verbal skills, and apply these skills to diverse populations that reflect their particular interests. Lecture, discussion, role-playing, video, group processing and reflection papers will be used to facilitate learning.

Section A: Phyllis Jeswald
Time: Wednesdays, 1:00 – 3:30 pm
Maximum: 20
Credits: 3


PY 693
Internship in Dance/Movement Therapy

Required of and Restricted to DMT students who have completed their coursework.

A supervised six- to nine-month DMT internship (minimum 700 hours) in a clinical setting in keeping with standards approved by the American Dance Therapy Association.

Section A: Phyllis Jeswald
Credits: 4


PY 693B
Internship Continuation

For Dance/Movement students continuing an internship begun in the Fall 2006 semester, through the Spring 2007 semester.

Section A: Phyllis Jeswald
Credits: uncredited


PY 599
Introduction to Psychodrama

Competency Area: Individual Assessment & Intervention Strategies

This workshop is designed to stimulate interest in the psychodramatic method for therapeutic work with groups, families and individuals. The focus will be on experiential learning, including direct participation in group action exercises and psychodramatic techniques such as: soliloquy, doubling, role reversal, mirroring, concretizing of metaphor and others. These techniques and their application will be discussed in light of psychodramatic theory and philosophy. Participants should expect to take from the workshop a number of useful techniques as well as the awareness of the power of this method and the need for further training before attempting in-depth psychodrama with clients. Although experiential in nature, the workshop is a training group, not a therapy group, and personal disclosure will occur only within proscribed boundaries. Participants will more often be asked to take on roles other than self rather than to explore personal material, although some personal sharing will occur.

Section A: Kim Burden
Time: Saturday & Sunday, January 27 & 28,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 24
Credits: 1


PYI 549
Lower Functioning Individuals on the Autism Spectrum: Advanced Assessment and Interventions

Competency Area: Individual Assessment & Intervention Strategies
Restricted to ASD Certificate students; others by written permission of the Program Director attached to or on registration form.

This course will explore working with more severely impaired individuals with Autism. Topics will include ABA, behavioral issues, working with the non-verbal student, etc., and topics will in-part be developed based upon student input. Participants will have opportunities to develop professional knowledge and research topics relevant to their needs. A portion of each class session will be devoted to supervision of students’ final projects demonstrating cumulative knowledge gained from the ASD program.

Section A: John Moran
Time: Saturdays, January 13, February 3 & 24,
March 24, April 28, and Sunday, May 20,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 8
Changed 11/30/06 to: Maximum: 15
Credits: 3


PYG 609
Marriage and Family Therapy

Seminar in Social and Cultural Diversity
Competency Area: Group Assessment & Intervention Strategies
Required of Restricted to MFT I students; others by written permission of Program Direction attached to or on registration form.

This seminar will provide an opportunity for students to examine the social and cultural prescriptions (gender, race, ethnicity, social class, religious affiliation, sexual orientation, physical ability, etc.) that define, enhance, and limit social, interpersonal, and professional interactions. Social diversity and cultural diversity will be defined in this class as concepts that are fluid but that also have tremendous power to shape the self and larger systems. These concepts will be particularly examined in relation to family systems, society, and clinical practice. It is hoped that as a consequence of this course, students will be better prepared to deal with the particular problems of oppression and intolerance, e.g. sexism, racism, ableism, classism, and heterosexism by having a firmer grasp on their personal values and their biases relative to majority-minority relations. Students will also have an opportunity to grow in their understanding and appreciation of their own identities by exploring and examining their own cultural narratives and engaging in their own volunteer service.

Section A: Anne Prouty Lyness
Time: Tuesdays, 4:00 – 6:30 pm (1/16/07 – 3/6/07)
Time: Tuesdays, 9:00 – 11:30 am (3/20/07 – 5/1/07)
Maximum: 20
Credits: 3


PYI 514
Methods of Testing and Assessment

Competency Area: Individual Assessment & Intervention Strategies
Required of and Restricted to CP I and SA/AC I students; others by written permission of the Program Director attached to or on registration form.
Prerequisite: PYB 506 Psychopathology: An Ecological Approach

This course will provide students with an overview of the theoretical, historical and cultural bases for assessment. Ethical standards, issues related to age, gender, ethnicity, culture, language and disabilities as they pertain to psychological testing and assessment, assessment methods and instruments, and the concepts of reliability, validity and the psychometrics of assessment will be covered. Students will have opportunities to examine a wide range of standardized tests, psychological inventories, projective materials, self report measures, and technical and interpretive manuals and instructions throughout the semester. Students successfully completing this course will be better able to understand and interpret psychological test and assessment information in their roles as mental health counselors.

Section A: Robert Chalif
Section B: Katherine McNally
Corrected 11/30/06: Section B: Kathryn McNally
Section C: Bill Griffith
Changed 11/30/06 to: Section C: TBA
Time: Tuesdays, 12:45 – 3:15 pm
Maximum: 18 per section
Credits: 3


PYC 677
Multicultural Counseling

Prerequisite: Completion of all CP I courses and internships as well as PYS 604 Social & Cultural Diversity.

This course presents the theory and practice of a multicultural and social justice counseling approach. Building on the foundations presented in Social & Cultural Diversity (PYS 604), students will deepen their understanding of diversity (broadly defined in terms of ethnicity, race, gender, socioeconomic status, culture, sexual orientation, physical/psychological ability, religion, age, etc.) and issues related to social justice and action as these factors influence the counseling process and the well being of the client. Students will be expected to engage in an ongoing examination of the attitudes, assumptions, beliefs, behaviors and power they hold within (and outside of) the counseling session and how these factors have an impact on the counseling process. Students will also be challenged to examine various systems (i.e., family, community, national, global) and the impact these systems have on everyone (clients, agencies, counselors, etc.) involved in these systems. Students will be encouraged to develop strategies and skills necessary to promote healthy, empowering environments. The course will provide opportunities for field experiences to reinforce didactic material presented in class.

Section A: Dottie Morris
Time: Tuesdays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 15
Credits: 3


PYS 607
Multicultural Counseling Field Studies

Competency Area: Social Systems Assessment & Intervention Strategies

This course is an intensive study in multicultural counseling in a variety of field settings and is focused on increasing multicultural counseling competencies. Students may select settings and design activities under faculty supervision.

Section A: Clinical Mental Health
Counseling/Counseling Psychology Core Faculty
Time by arrangement
Maximum: 10
Credits: variable (1-3)


PYP 692
Practicum II in Dance/Movement Therapy

Required of and Restricted to DMT I students.

Practicum in Dance/Movement Therapy provides students with an opportunity to observe various clinical and educational settings and populations and to participate in, co- lead, and lead DMT sessions. On site supervision is provided by a DMT (BC-DMT) practitioner. Learning to identify group and individual interventions and applying theoretical learning from concurrent courses are prime goals of the course.

Section A: Susan Loman,
Claire LeMessurier & Kim Burden
Time: Wednesdays, 9:00 – 11:00 am
(individual times may vary)
Maximum: 17
Credits: 2


PYD 601
Professional Orientation and Ethics

Competency Area: Professional Identity
Required of and restricted to CMHC and SA/AC spring entering students.

This course provides an introduction to the field of mental health counseling. It will include topics such as the history and current status of the profession, professional organizations and credentialing, the roles and functions of the mental health counselor, including advocacy for the profession. The role of the counselor as a social change agent and advocate for social justice will be emphasized. A major portion of the course is the study of ethical practice, which will cover AMHCA and ACA codes and standards, as well as legal issues in counseling practice. In addition, use of technology in counseling, and professional writing and communication standards will be covered.

Section A: Ken Bacon, Katherine Clarke,
Diane Kurinsky, Dottie Morris
Time: Wednesdays, 1:00 – 3:30 pm
Maximum: 24
Credits: 3


PY 687
Professional Seminar in Counseling Psychology II – Emphasis:
Contextual Dimensions in Mental Health Counseling (DMT II)
PY 695A
Internship, Counseling Psychology (DMT)

Restricted to DMT II students.
Please Note: Students will continue with the same instructor from Fall 2006 semester. Please specify section letter clearly on registration form to ensure being registered for the correct section.

This is a continuation of Professional Seminar in Counseling Psychology I for DMT II students. This course provides an overview of the current contexts of mental health practice. Selected topics will include: role of the mental health counselor in contemporary practice settings, multicultural issues, standards of ethical practice, and theories and practices of consultation. Students will have an opportunity to integrate their current internship experiences with their theoretical learning and to develop skills in peer supervision and consultation. Students will be supported in their transition to mental health professionals through in-depth exploration of self-in-role.

Section A: Alice Scudder
Section B: Kim Burden
Time: Tuesdays, 12:45 – 3:15 pm
Maximum: 8 per section
Credits: ProSem: 3; Internship: 3


PY 687
Professional Seminar in Counseling Psychology II – Emphasis: Professional Ethics
PY 695D
Internship

(CP and SA/AC I Students)
Restricted to continuing students.
Prerequisite: Completion of PY 686 Professional Seminar in Counseling Psychology I and PY 695 Practicum in Counseling Psychology.
Please Note: Students will continue with the same instructor from Fall semester. Please specify section letter clearly on registration form to ensure being registered for the correct section.

The Professional Seminar will focus on the ethical standards and legal issues related to clinical practice. Students will become familiar with the American Counseling Association and American Mental Health Counseling Association Codes of Ethical Standards and the various statutory requirements that impact on the work with clients. The student will be able to recognize the ethical principles and legal issues related to the counselor role and to utilize this knowledge in their work with clients and colleagues.

Concurrent with the Professional Seminar, CP and SA/AC I students must participate in an internship, totaling at least 600 hours over the course of the Fall 2006 and Spring 2007 semesters at an approved site. It is expected that the remainder of the 600 hours will be completed this semester.

Sections A & B – for DMT II students only.
Sections D – K: Restricted to CP and SA/AC I students.
Section D: Molly Scott
Section E: Larry Ruhf
Section F: Meg Connor
Section G: Dottie Morris
Section H: Betsy Taylor
Section I: Ramona Anderson
Section J: Robert Chalif
Section K: Tom Barker
Time: Tuesdays, 4:00 – 6:30 pm
Maximum: 8 per section
Credits: ProSem: 3; Internship: 4


PY 689
Professional Seminar in Counseling Psychology IV – Emphasis: Professional Identity
(CP II and SA/AC II)
PY 696
Internship, Counseling Psychology

Restricted to continuing CP and SA/AC II students.
Prerequisite: Completion of PY 688 Professional Seminar in Counseling Psychology III and PY 696C Internship in Counseling Psychology III.

This final semester of the professional seminar is the capstone course in the student’s development as a mental health counselor. An understanding of the professional history, standards and practices is key to this course. An integration of ethics and issues of ethical practice will be emphasized. Students will be supported in their transition to mental health professionals through in-depth exploration of self-in-role, readings and discussions on selected topics in mental health practice, continued discussions of ethical practice, and final competency demonstrations of integration of theory and practice.

Concurrent with the Professional Seminar, CP II students must participate in an Internship, totaling at least 600 hours over the course of the Fall 2006 and Spring 2007 semesters at an approved site. It is expected that the remainder of the 600 hours will be completed this semester.

Section A: Ken Bacon
Section B: Molly Scott
Section C: John Van Ness
Section D: Diane Kurinsky
Section E: Betsy Taylor
Section F: Heri Tryba
Section G: Emily DeFrance
Time: Tuesdays, 12:45 – 3:15 pm
Maximum: 8 per section
Credits: ProSem: 3; Internship: 4


PY 681B
Professional Seminar in Dance/Movement Therapy II – Emphasis: Professional Orientation

Required of and Restricted to DMT I students.

This course provides students with a forum for the integration of practicum experiences, theoretical material and personal learning related to professional development. It will offer a supportive environment to discuss the interface of ethical, personal and professional issues. Developing an identity as a mental health counselor and a dance/movement therapist, and understanding the issues relevant to these roles in relation to the larger professional organizations and associations will be included. Attention will also be drawn to group process and dynamics as evidenced in the ongoing development of the peer group. The application of core DMT skills and competencies will be an ongoing aspect of the course. In addition, attention will be given to locating and securing a counseling practicum/internship for the following year.

Section A: Alice Scudder
Time: Tuesdays, 4:00 – 6:30 pm
Maximum: 17
Credits: 3


PY 687A
Professional Seminar in Marriage & Family Therapy II
PY 697
Practicum in Marriage & Family Therapy

Restricted to continuing MFT I students.
Please Note: Students will be assigned to new sections in the spring semester. Please specify section letter clearly on registration form to ensure being registered for the correct section.

This course is a continuation of Professional Seminar in Marriage & Family Therapy I. During this semester students’ practica will continue to be monitored and dyadic and group systemic supervision will be provided. Issues of becoming a systems professional will be covered. Students will begin to discuss their affinities toward models in MFT, and how these fit with their own theory of change and styles of working with clients.

Section A: Tim Lowry
Section B: Lucie Bourdon
Section C: Steve Price
Section D: Doug Smith
Section D: cancelled 11/30/06
Time: Tuesdays, 12:45 – 3:45
Maximum: 6 per section
Credits: ProSem: 2; Practicum: 4


PY 689A
Professional Seminar in Marriage & Family Therapy V
PY 698
Internship in Marriage & Family Therapy

Restricted to continuing MFT II students.

This is a continuation of Professional Seminar in Marriage & Family Therapy IV (PY 688B). Students will complete and present their theory of therapy papers and their application to a client case from their internships. Issues related to professional practice in the current mental health climate will be introduced. Students will begin to formulate plans for continued professional growth and mentorship with the goal of working toward the LMFT in their region of practice.

Section A: Anne Prouty Lyness
Time: Tuesdays, 12:45 – 3:15 pm
Maximum: 6 per section
Credits: ProSem: 3; Internship: 4


PYB 514
Psychomotor Assessment of Adults

Competency Area: Behavioral Science Foundation
Required of and Restricted to DMT I students; others by written permission of the Program Director attached to or on registration form.

This course will provide students with a review of the theoretical, historical and cultural bases for assessment. Students will become familiar with the basic principles of psychological, nonverbal, and behavioral observation, assessment and analysis for use in diagnosis, treatment planning and intervention applicable with adult populations. Ethical standards, issues related to age, gender, ethnicity, culture, language, and disabilities as they pertain to testing and assessment, will be covered. Students will learn procedures for nonverbal assessment, with a continued focus on the Kestenberg Movement Profile, and will be exposed to other tests and instruments for psychological, environmental and performance assessment. Students will be introduced to reliability, validity and statistical concepts and standards. They will learn the applications of these assessment tools in clinical diagnosis and treatment of adults, for individuals and groups.

Section A: Susan Loman
Time: Tuesdays, 12:45 – 3:15 pm
Maximum: 20
Credits: 3


CLASS CANCELLED 03/22/07

PYB 513
Psychopathology: Eating Disorders

Competency Area: Behavioral Science Foundation
Priority to second-year Applied Psychology students.

In this workshop, students will learn differential diagnosis and treatment of eating/weight disorders within an individual psychotherapy model. Learning will occur through didactic presentations, case presentations, experiential exercises, and class discussion. The influence of culture and media on eating disorders will be addressed as well as issues concerning the stigmatization of obesity. Family, dance/movement, and 12-step techniques will not be formally addressed but are welcome in discussion.

Section A: Margaret Goodwin
Time: Saturday & Sunday, March 24 & 25,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 24
Credits: 1


PY 656
Psychopathology & the Assessment of Social Systems

Competency Area: Behavioral Science & Social Systems Assessment & Interventions Strategies; COAMFTE Area II: Clinical Knowledge
Required of and Restricted to MFT I students; others by written permission of the Instructor attached to or on registration form.
Prerequisites: PYD 600 Ethics and Professional Development in MFT Practice, PY 642B Theoretical Foundations of Marriage & Family Therapy and PY 576 Survey of Marriage and Family Therapy Models.

This course will instruct students in the theory, methods and research of clinical systems assessment of psychopathology and multiaxial diagnosis. This course will review interventions, including relational psychotherapeutic and chemical, for several of the major diagnostic categories. Students will learn to perform individual, relational, and larger systems assessments, including but not limited to a mental status exam, a medical genogram, and diagnosis using the DSM-IV TR.

Section A: Doug Smith
Time: Tuesdays, 9:00 – 11:30 am (1/16/07 – 3/6/07)
Time: Tuesdays, 4:00 – 6:30 pm (3/20/07 – 5/1/07)
Maximum: 24
Credits: 3


PY 563
Psychopharmacology of Substance Abuse

Competency Area: Behavioral Science Foundation
Required of and Priority to SA/AC II students.
Prerequisite: PYB 523 Psychopharmacology for Counselors or equivalent

This course will present current concepts of addiction, drugs of abuse and pharmacological treatments for those in recovery from addiction. Special attention will be given to mechanisms of tolerance and the concepts of tolerance, addiction, and drug-seeking behavior. Related basic concepts such as neurotransmitters, receptor sites, drug interaction and other pharmacological dynamics will be presented in support of the basic discussion.

Section A: Lindsay Freese
Time: Saturday & Sunday, February 10 & 11,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 24
Credits: 1


PYB 523
Psychopharmacology for Counselors

Competency Area: Behavioral Science Foundation

This weekend course will focus on the clinical uses of psychotropic medications in the treatment of affective disorders, psychotic disorders and anxiety disorders. The mechanisms by which abused substances affect the body and drugs used in the treatment of substance abuse disorders will also be covered. The basic biology underlying these disorders will be presented as part of the discussion of the therapeutic mechanisms of drug action.

Changed 03/19/07 to:
This weekend course will focus on the mechanisms of action of psychotropic medications in the treatment of affective disorders, psychotic disorders and anxiety disorders. The basic neuroanatomy and neurobiology underlying these disorders will be presented as part of the discussion of the therapeutic mechanisms of drug action. In addition, the mechanisms by which abused substances affect the body and the drugs used in the treatment of substance abuse disorders will also be covered.

Section A: Judith Durham
Time: Saturday & Sunday, March 3 & 4,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 24
Credits: 1


PY 565
Religious Issues in Counseling and Therapy

CLASS CANCELLED 01/18/07
Competency Area: Elective

Cultural competence for counselors and therapists must include an orientation to and understanding of diverse religious and spiritual perspectives. Individuals and families’ religious and spiritual orientations offer challenges and opportunities for the counselors and therapists committed to helping them. This workshop will offer a basic orientation to three major religions prevalent in our society. Similarities and differences in world view, practices and beliefs will be examined in Judaism, Christianity and Islam and strategies for including and addressing religious issues in the therapeutic context will be examined.

Section A: TBA
Time: Saturday & Sunday, February 24 & 25,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 24
Credits: 1


PYC 654
Research and Evaluation

Required of and Priority to CP II and SA/AC II students; others by written permission of the Program Director attached to or on registration form.

This course will familiarize students with clinically relevant research methods including surveys, experimental, quasi-experimental, and single case replication designs, clinical outcome, research and program evaluation. The research on empirically validated treatments will be examined. Students will present research or research designs supporting their approach to treatment within a selected client population. In addition, this course will include an examination of the ACA/APA ethical guidelines for conducting research, and issues of diversity in research and evaluation. An overview of statistical concepts and terminology related to research methods will be included.

Section A: Rachel Becker-Klein
Section B: Sarah Gates
Time Section A: Tuesdays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Section B: Tuesdays, 4:00 – 6:30 pm
Maximum: 24
Credits: 3


PYB 515
Research and Evaluation in Dance/Movement Therapy

Competency Area: Behavioral Science Foundations
Required of and Restricted to DMT II students, others by written permission of Program Director attached to or on registration form. Equivalent to PYC 654.

This course will familiarize students with clinically relevant research including qualitative and quantitative methods, such as surveys, experimental and clinical outcome research as well as program evaluation. Students will present research proposals supporting their approach to treatment within a selected dance/movement therapy client population. In addition, this course will include an examination of the ACA/APA ethical guidelines for conducting research, and issues of diversity in research and evaluation. An overview of statistical concepts and terminology related to research methods as well as research as a creative process will be included.

Section A: TBA
Changed 11/30/06 to: Section A: Craig Donnan
Time: Tuesdays, 4:00 – 6:30 pm
Maximum: 20
Credits 3


PYC 674A
Research and Evaluation in Marriage and Family Therapy

Required of and Priority to MFT students. Open to CP II equivalent to PYC 654; others by written permission of Instructor attached to or on registration form.
Prerequisite: Completion of MFT I courses

In addition to providing the student with a background in the basics of research methodology, this course will focus on the major themes and controversies in the Marriage and Family Therapy field. It will also teach students how to use journals and current literature in the field in order to enhance their knowledge and to aid them in viewing their work and the work of others more critically.

Section A: Kevin Lyness (1/16/07 – 3/6//07),
Doug Smith (3/20/07 – 5/1/07)
Time: Tuesdays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 24
Credits: 3


PYS 604
Social and Cultural Diversity

Competency Area: Social Systems Assessment & Intervention Strategies;
Required of and Priority to CMHC (SA/AC) Spring 2007 & Fall 2006 entrants; others by written permission of the Program Director attached to or on registration form.
Sections: A – C: Required of and restricted to Spring 2007, Fall 2006 CMHC (SA/AC) entrants. 8 seats reserved per section for CMHC Spring 2007 entrants.

This course will expose students to issues of ethnicity, race, gender, socioeconomic status, culture, sexual orientation, physical/psychological ability, religion, age, etc. as these relate to their development as therapists/counselors. Students will explore their own attitudes and beliefs through experiential exercises, small- and large-group discussions. Through discussions of texts, novels, films and lectures, students will learn about historical contexts and contemporary concerns of diverse groups. In order to provide a foundation for competent and ethical practice, students will examine strategies for working professionally as individual, group and family therapists/counselors with diverse populations.

Section A: Dottie Morris
Section B: Carlotta Willis
Section C: Alice Scudder
Changed 11/30/06 to: Section C: Wendy Elliot
Time: Wednesdays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 22 per section
Credits: 3


PY 678
Special Issues in Family Therapy, Substance Abuse & Intrafamilial Violence

Restricted to MFT II students; PYC equivalent for CP/SA/AC II with written permission of Instructor; others by written permission of Instructor attached to or on registration form.

This course is designed to expand the conceptual constructs and treatment strategies of the students in their work with families in which there is violence and/or addictions. Time will be allotted for students to research and present on their interests in these topics and the clinical issues they raise. We will consider the cultural contexts of the occurrences and treatment of family violence and addictions.

Section A: Doug Smith (1/16/07 – 3/6/07)
Kevin Lyness (3/20/07 – 5/1/07)
Time: Tuesdays, 4:00 – 6:30 pm
Maximum: 24
Credits: 3


PYC 663
Spiritual Approaches to Mental Health Counseling

(formerly Spirituality & Counseling)
Restricted to CP II students; others by written permission of Program Director attached to or on registration form.
Prerequisite: Completion of all CP I courses and internships

This course will combine a survey of transpersonal theory with an approach to counseling which emanates from that theory. The developmental approach of Wilber and Washburn, the consciousness studies of Tart and Grof and the psychology of spiritual traditions will form a theoretical foundation. Issues include assessing the spiritual condition of client and counselor, the role of religious training in personality development, distinguishing religious and spiritual issues from pathology, and assessing spiritual discipline in counseling. Regular participation in spiritual practice and half an hour daily practice is required.

Course description changed 11/30/06:
This course will provide a survey of transpersonal experience and theory as well as religious and spiritual traditions. An approach to counseling which can be adapted to many clinical situations will emerge from that survey. Issues in counseling will include assessing the spiritual condition of both client and counselor, distinguishing religious and spiritual issues from serious pathology, recognizing the resources and dangers of religious and spiritual traditions, and assessing the use of spiritual disciplines and techniques in therapy. Students will be asked to reflect on their own spiritual journeys. A co-requisite, Regular meditation practice, one half hour per day, is also on the syllabus.

Section A: John Van Ness
Time: Tuesdays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 15
Credits: 3


PY 690
SIS: Supervised Independent Study

If you are planning an independent study, please register for an SIS on your registration form; however, an SIS contract must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office by April 20, 2007, in order for it to appear on your schedule or transcript. Please be sure to specify on the contract if the SIS will be used to fulfill a competency area or serve as a required course substitute, or as an elective. Contracts received after the April 20th deadline will be returned to you for registration in a subsequent semester (additional costs may apply). Credits will not appear on your schedule until the SIS contract(s) has been submitted to the Registrar’s Office, thus affecting your enrollment status and perhaps your financial aid eligibility.

Credits: variable


PY 572
Theories of Addiction

Competency Area: CP: Behavioral Science Foundation; CMHC: Substance Abuse Counseling
Required of all CP and CMHC students.
Priority to CP II students.

This course will serve as a basic introduction to the psychopathology of substance abuse and addiction. The class will examine various theories which seek to define addiction, discuss diagnosis and assessment of chemical dependency, and explore stages of treatment and different treatment modalities. The program of Alcoholics Anonymous will be analyzed as a generic model of 12-step programs. Other self-help formats will be identified and described.

Section A: Tom Barker
Time: Saturday & Sunday, March 10 & 11,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 24 per section
Credits: 1


PYI 537
Working With Teens and Adults on the Spectrum

Required of and Restricted to ASD Certificate Students, others by written permission of the Program Director attached to or on registration form.

Transition from a teenager to an adult can be a particularly challenging time for people on the autism spectrum as well as their educators, other professionals, and family. Topics include developing skills in self-advocacy and disclosure, employment, continuing education, relationships, as well as appropriate interdependent living. Readings, class discussions, guest lectures and panel discussions will be used to explore class topics.

Section A: Stephen Shore
Section B: Ellen Korin
Time: Sundays, February 25 & March 25,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 24
Credits: 1


PY 510
Writing Skills for Counselors

Competency Area: Elective

This course focuses on the development of professional writing skills. It begins with a discussion of successful writing habits, continues with an overview of basic writing skills and ends with more advanced skills, such as writing logical, well-organized papers. The course also covers APA writing standards for professional reports and papers. Students will immediately apply new skills using hands-on exercises.

Section A: Greg Blair
Time: Saturday & Sunday, February 3 & 4,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 24
Changed 01/18/07 to: Maximum 10
Credits: 1