Environmental Studies Courses Fall 2007

Registration Instructions and Course Schedules
ES Master’s Programs (PDF 114KB)
ES PhD Program (PDF 80KB)

Course Descriptions (below)
Master’s Programs
Doctoral Program (Ph.D)


Department of Environmental Studies – Master’s Programs Courses


ES 506
Advanced Professional Seminar for Resource Management & Conservation

Competency Areas: RMC – Required
Required of and Restricted to second year RMC students.

This seminar provides students with the opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of the environmental professions, to examine career goals and to build a professional peer support network. Utilizing a career development approach, core faculty will work with students to identify professional issues.

Each student will develop a plan to market their specific skills and knowledge-base to targeted potential employers. This plan will have an attached time line and associated benchmarks to be reached. This plan will consider and build upon choices of final practica and Master’s Project topic so to better position students to enter the environmental professional field of their choice..

Section A: Michael Simpson
Time: Thursdays, September 6 & 20, October 4 & 18, November 15 & December 6, 1:00 – 3:30 pm
Maximum: 16
Credits: 1


ES 518
Advocacy Clinic I

Competency Area: EAO – Required; CB, EE, Cert, IND & RMA/RMC – Elective
Required of Environmental Advocacy & Organizing students.

Do you want to take sustained, effective action on an issue you care about and achieve purposeful results? Are you looking for an opportunity to develop and hone your advocacy skills and to strengthen your effectiveness as a social change agent? This course offers participants the opportunity to engage in supervised practical advocacy work on behalf of clinic ‘clients’ – organizations at the local, state, national or international level working for environmental protection, corporate accountability, democratic governance and social justice. Students will design, conduct and evaluate advocacy projects for actual organizations under the supervision of the instructor. The goal of the course is to provide students with a strong supervised experiential learning opportunity in the field with more group support, attention to theory, and supervision than an individual practicum placement usually allows. Course elements include campaign and project planning & management, research & lobbying skills, effective communication (e.g., media releases, briefing papers), and project evaluation. The course will combine theory with practical supervised experience and direct interaction with on-the-ground advocates.

Section A: Abigail Abrash Walton
Times: Thursdays, 1:00 – 4:00 pm
Maximum 10
Credits: 3


ESAM 516
Building Sustainable Organizations

Competency Areas: RMC – Required; IND, CB, EAO, EE & Cert – Elective
Priority to RMC students.

BSO surveys the landscape of sustainability theory and literature by considering organizational purpose, design and behavior through the lenses of ecology, management, economics and social justice. This course prepares students to analyze organizations from the perspective of sustainable practices, and to develop an understanding of the importance of self-knowledge and personal sustainability. BSO is designed to serve as a gateway for further study. The course relies on heavily active participation by all class members, drawing from each participant’s previous organizational and managerial experiences.

Section A: Jim Gruber
Time: Thursdays, 1:00 – 4:00 pm
Maximum: 16
Credits: 3


ESF 539A
Coastal Geoecology

Competency Area: Natural Communities elective
Priority to ES students who entered Fall 06.

Note: Attendance at ALL pre-trip meetings is mandatory. Enrolled students who fail to drop the course 1 week before the first pre-trip meeting or who fail to attend the first pre-trip meeting will be held financially responsible for the cost of the trip and will forfeit their seat in the class. Students on the waitlist are strongly encouraged to attend the first class.

On this 5-day trip, we will examine the geoecology of glaciated coasts in New England using Cape Cod as a model system. Course topics will include landscape to local-scale depositional and erosional processes as influenced by coastal climate and disturbance; barrier island dynamics and the ecological role of estuaries; geological and climatic controls on coastal evolution; vascular plant succession and soil ecological processes on active dune systems; impacts of coastal development and other human impacts on physical and ecological processes; and management issues in New England coastal systems. Cost: approximately $300.00.

Section A: Jim Jordan & Rachel Thiet
Times: Pre-trip meeting: Wednesday, September 5
5:00 – 8:00 pm and
Saturday – Wednesday, September 22 – 26, Study Trip
Location: Antioch and Cape Cod, Massachusetts
Maximum: 12
Credits: 2


ESF 550
Community Ecology of the New England Landscape

Competency Area: Natural Communities – Required
Required of and Priority to ALL ES students entering in Fall 07.
Prerequisite: Being able to identify by bark the two dozen most common species of central New England trees (study guide available through Antioch’s web site and FirstClass. (Registration for training modules available August 29 and Sept 4).

This course examines the diversity of plant communities found in central New England with special attention to the impact of topography, substrate, and disturbance regimes on community composition and structure. As a largely field-based course, both qualitative and quantitative means will be used to describe community composition and structure, as well as the reasons for community placement. Ecocindicator species will be used to delineate specific topographic and edaphic sites, while evidence of various disturbances will be used to interpret successional patterns as a means for reading the landscape. The course will have a strong grounding in concepts related to community ecology including dominance, diversity, niche structuring, and succession. Skills in plant community sampling, soil interpretation, and plant identification will also be developed. A number of outstanding representatives of community types in the central Connecticut River watershed will be visited.

Sections A, B & D: Peter Palmiotto
Sections C & E: John Gunn
Time: Section A: Wednesdays,
9:00 am – 12:00 pm
(priority to students who register for
ESS 572 Section A)
Section B & C: Fridays, 8:00 – 11:00 am
Sections D & E: Fridays, 1:00 – 4:00 pm
Maximum: 16 per section
Credits: 3


ESE 535
Conceptual and Human Development

Competency Areas: Cert – Required: EE – Required alternate; EAO, CB, IND & RMC – Elective
Required of and Priority to ES Certification students who entered Fall 06.

An understanding of human development is the foundation for effective teaching. Developmental processes, the intersection of biology and cultural context, are the blueprint upon which the educational objectives and curricula of schools should be built. We will explore the entire life span, focusing on cognitive development throughout, with primary emphasis on middle childhood and adolescence. In an attempt to better understand thinking and learning, we will explore a variety of questions including: What is thinking? How does it develop? What is intelligence? and, Are learning and intelligence related? This course will provide an overview of the potential conceptual abilities of children and adults and a framework for creating effective curricula.

Section A: Sue Gentile
Time: Fridays, 1:00 – 4:00 pm
and Saturday October 27 9:00am – 4:00pm at the Harris Center
Note: No class on Fridays, October 12 & 26


Maximum: 16
(1 seat reserved for Education student)
Credits: 3


ESS 563
Conservation Biology

Competency Area: CB – Required; EAO, EE, Cert, IND & RMC – Elective
Required of and Priority to Conservation Biology students.

This course examines the biology underlying our attempts to conserve diversity at the level of genes, species, communities, and ecosystems. We will learn about the major issues and problems in conservation biology, and the tools biologists use to accomplish their conservation goals. We will apply qualitative and quantitative tools from population biology, and community and landscape ecology to learn how we can predict the vulnerability of populations and species to extinction. Example case studies and current events will allow us to explore issues such as reserve design and management, policy issues, reintroduction projects, and restoration efforts. Students will delve into the most recent conservation biology literature to become familiar with predominant debates and contentious issues in the field. The course is designed to help students develop a critical perspective, pertinent quantitative tools, and a vision of where the field of conservation biology came from and where it is headed.

Sections A & B: Beth Kaplin
Time: Section A: Thursdays, 8:00 – 11:00 am
Section B: Thursdays, 1:00 – 4:00 pm
Maximum: 12 per section
Credits: 3


ESE 514
Curriculum Design: Non-Formal

Competency Areas: EE – Required; Cert, EAO, CB, IND & RMC – Elective
Required of and Priority to ES Environmental Education students who entered Fall 06.

Designing curriculum is an extremely creative process, filled with controversies and dilemmas. It is a political, philosophical, and theoretical process. In this class, we will analyze, critique, and redesign both the explicit and hidden curriculum of a variety of materials as we attempt to resolve our conflicting conceptions of curriculum and develop our own philosophy of curriculum design. Consider this course as a way to help you move further along with your own questions and concerns about curriculum design and as an opportunity to twist, stretch, and flip your current understanding of what it means to design curriculum.

Section A: Libby McCann
Time: Section A: Fridays, 1:00 – 4:00 pm
Maximum: 16
Credits: 3


ESS 572
Earth Systems Science: Planetary Dynamics

Competency Areas: Biosphere Science – Required
Required of and Priority to ES students entering in Fall 07.

This course employs a systems approach to understanding earth’s physical and biological environment by examining the large-scale components and processes of the earth system. Understanding the interaction of these elements and their natural variability in space and time is critical for assessing the rates, drivers, and consequences of environmental change. Content will emphasize climate change dynamics, biogeochemical cycles, and land use patterns and their feedback relationships with the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, pedosphere, and biosphere.

Sections A: Jim Jordan
Sections B & D: Rachel Thiet
Sections C & E: Mark Erler
Time: Section A: Wednesdays, 1:00 – 4:00 pm
(priority to students who register for
ESF 550 section A)
Section B & C: Fridays, 8:00 – 11:00 am
Sections D & E: Fridays, 1:00 – 4:00 pm
Maximum: 16 per section
Credits: 3


ESP 601
Ecological Economics and Public Policy

Competency Areas: Civic Ecology
Priority to ES students entering in Fall 07.

The premise of this course is that human actions are embedded within the natural environment. The political and economic systems that have been developed to meet the needs of a society are framed by the limitations of that environment. This course will allow students to explore how these societal institutions function to deal with questions as freedom of choice, scarcity, ownership, equity, sustainability and change.

The course will investigate the development of environmental policies as informed by science, economics, public opinion and legal precedent. Students will be introduced to the policy tools utilized to translate policy into implementation and how effective such approaches have been in meeting overall environmental policy objectives. The primary focus will be within the United States, but innovative approaches that have been developed and utilized in other countries will also be presented to the students.

Section A: Jim Gruber
Time: Thursdays, 8:00 – 11:00 am
Maximum: 16
(4 seats reserved for 2nd year ES students)
Credits: 3


ES 519
Ecological Research Design

Competency Areas: CB – Required; EAO, EE, Cert, IND & RMC – Elective
Required of and Priority to Conservation Biology students.

This course encourages successful ecological field research by building skills in hypothesis generation, selection of appropriate methods of data collection, use of correct statistical analyses, and effective presentation of results. Basic univariate parametric and non-parametric statistical procedures (chi-square and related tests; ANOVA; regression and correlation analyses) are reviewed. Through lectures, group homework projects, and analysis of quantitative methods used in current studies of conservation biology, students develop skills needed to design effective field research aimed at biodiversity conservation and natural lands management.

Sections A & B: Jon Atwood
Time: Section A: Thursdays, 8:00 – 11:00 am
Section B: Thursdays, 1:00 – 4:00 pm
Maximum: 12 per section
Credits: 3


ESE 513
Environmental Education Methods: Educating for Sustainability

Competency Areas: EE – Required alternate; Cert, EAO, CB, IND & RMC – Elective
Priority to ES Environmental Education students who entered Fall 06.

Pamela Mang writes that sustainability is the ability of the human species to stay around for the long haul? What does this mean? How do you define sustainability? What does it require? How can it be? What is the role of education in that process? What would people know and be able to do if they were educated for a sustainable future? What can we, as educators, do to cultivate the necessary knowledge, skills, and habits of mind in our students so that they may enact sustainable lifestyles? This course provides an introduction to educating for sustainability (EFS). We will explore the concept of sustainability and the meanings of EFS as we identify and clarify how these may be incorporated into our work as environmental educators. With the goal of increasing awareness, knowledge, and understanding of the core content, competencies, and habits of mind which characterize EFS, we will consider its philosophical foundations and historical context and engage in activities focused on integrating core content in our work, including systems thinking, sustainable economics, the role of social equity in sustainable communities, place as curriculum, and the science of sustainability. From habits of mind to regenerative resource management, we will study the emerging field of EFS to broaden our expertise as environmental educators.

Section A: Sue Gentile
Times: Thursdays, 1:00 – 4:00 pm
Maximum: 16
(1 seat reserved for Science Education student)
Credits: 3


ESP 551A
Environmental Law

Competency Area: Civic Ecology
Priority to RMC students entering in Fall 07.

This course will survey some critical federal environmental statutes in the United States and highlight important case law decided under those statutes. While an in-depth treatment of environmental law is not possible in a course of this length, we will examine the historical context of the major environmental statutes and regulations as well as their impact on land, air, water, and natural resources. We will explore how law and regulations are passed, and how the judicial, legislative, and executive branches of government and the regulatory agencies function. The course objectives include becoming familiar with a new vocabulary and learning how to read a legal opinion. We will begin to understand what a lawyer does and how to think like a lawyer. This course will test our abilities to spot legal issues and deliver reasoned and reasonable arguments on opposing sides of an issue.

Section A: Rebecca Todd
Time: Thursdays, 9:00 – 11:30 am, and
TBA Saturday, 9:00 am – 4:30 pm
Maximum: 16
(2 seats reserved for 2nd year RMC students)
Credits: 3


ESP 550A
Environmental Site Assessment

Competency Areas: RMC – Environmental Policy elective; EAO, CB, EE, Cert & IND – Elective
Note: This 2 credit course does NOT fulfill the Civic Ecology requirement.
Priority to RMC students.

This course is useful for anyone who will be working in a field that is related to the preservation, conservation or management of land and water resources. The course content reviews, and allows student to practice, evaluation approaches so as to assess potential or actual impacts from human activities associated with a parcel of land. Such procedures range from the formalized ASTM Phase I site assessment procedures to techniques for rapid site-assessment so as to document and mitigate non-point source pollution.

The skills developed in this course will assist students hoping to work for such organizations as a land trust, watershed association, a planning agency or a consultancy that focuses on landowner regulatory compliance and liability issues.

Section A: Michael Simpson
Time: Thursdays, September 6 – October 18,
8:00 – 11:00 am and
Saturday, September 29,
9:00 am – 4:00 pm
Maximum: 16
Credits: 2


ESCO 527
Environmental Writing

Competency Area: EE – EE Methods Required alternate; CB, Cert, EAO, RMC, IND – Elective
Priority to ES students who entered Fall 06.

This course provides an introduction to a variety of styles of environmental writing. Primary focus will be on nature writing as a process of exploring and communicating one’s experience of the natural world. Assigned weekly papers will begin with descriptive and narrative nature essays, and proceed to incorporate environmental issues, scientific material, and the revising process. Activities will include reading and responding to each other’s work in a class workshop setting as well as small editing groups, and discussing contemporary essays as models. A variety of class exercises will enable students of all levels of writing experience to overcome blocks and develop skill, style and voice.

Section A: Fred Taylor
Time: Thursdays, 8:30 – 11:00 am
(Optional field trip to Cape Cod – TBA)
Maximum: 14
Credits: 3


ESF 559
Field Study of Autumn

Competency Area: Natural Communities
Priority to ES students who entered Fall 06.

This course will explore the natural history sign-posts of Autumn as a season of transition. Using the Harris Center’s surrounding landscapes of field, forest, mountains, and wetlands, course participants will observe and interpret the stories of animals, plants and fungi preparing for winter. Class time will be a blend of field observation and exploration, discussion and readings of naturalists and scientists about such autumnal phenomena as migration, food hording, and foliage and pelage changes.

Section A: Susie Spikol
Time: Fridays, 8:00 – 11:00 am
Location: Harris Center, Hancock
Maximum: 16
Credits: 3


ESE 502
Foundations of Environmental Education

Competency Areas: EE – Required; Cert – Required alternate with written permission; EAO, CB, IND, & RMC – Elective
Required of and Priority to ES Environmental Education students entering Fall 07.

This course will provide a broad overview of the Environmental Education movement by constructing a working definition of its goals and the various manifestations of those goals within local, regional, state, national and international organizations. We will explore the personal values that drive people to choose environmental education as a profession and look at the implications of that choice on lifestyle, civic participation, relationships and work-life. Students will predict possible future scenarios for environmental educators and their role in the organizations that support their efforts.

Sections A: Libby McCann
Time: Section A: Thursdays, 1:00 – 4:00 pm
Maximum: 16
(1 seat reserved for Science Education student)
Credits: 3


ES 510
Geographic Information System (GIS): An Integrating Technology

Competency Areas: RMC – Required alternate to Proposal Writing; EAO, EE, IND & Cert – Elective
Priority to 2nd year RMC students.

This is an introductory course in the use of GIS software to create, manage and work with spatially explicit data. This class will explore how to access GIS information available on the WWW, extract and analyze quantitative data using ArcGIS 9.x software, understand limitations associated with various data sources and use software for preparation of maps.

Note: Please check the FirstClass course folder for pre-class readings and assignments.

Section A: Fash Farashahi
Time: Section A: Thursdays, 5:00 – 8:00 pm
Maximum: 12
Credits: 3


ESP 532
Human Dimensions of Conservation Biology

Competency Areas: Civic Ecology
Priority to ES students entering Fall 07.

This class starts from the premise that conservation biology is the study of inter-connected natural and human systems and that progress in public policy issues associated with conservation biology requires scientific understandings of both ecological systems and human social systems. In this class we will take a scientific approach to understanding peoples’ cognitive and behavioral processes associated with policy problems in conservation biology. This course introduces students not familiar with social sciences to the research and theoretical literature in fields of sociology, anthropology, and political science as applied to problems of conservation biology. Topics include: measuring environmental values and attitudes, pro-environmental behavior, social conflict, public participation, local knowledge, the integration of science and democracy, and institutions for co-management. Practical case studies are used to illustrate theoretical points. The overall purpose of this course is to survey the social sciences literature associated with practice and research in conservation biology to expose students to the importance of treating the human dimensions of conservation biology problems with the same scientific rigor customarily given to the ecological dimensions.

Section A: Thomas Webler
Time: Thursdays, 8:30 – 11:00 am
Maximum: 15 (4 seats reserved for 2nd year)
Credits: 3


ESE 525
Instructional Delivery: Art & Craft

Competency Areas: Cert, EE, EAO, CB, RMC & IND – Elective
Priority to Science Teacher certification students.

It is possible for two experienced teachers to design an exemplary hands-on, minds-on, student-centered, democratic, constructivist, inquiry-based ecology lesson of which one is a huge hit and the other a FLOP! Why then will only one of the two teachers, both equally faithful to the written lesson plan, succeed? This course hopes to address this question.

Successful science teachers develop a toolbox of techniques for delivering effective instruction. They use a variety of provocative classroom start-ups, create enticing agendas, present engaging demonstrations, maximize their students’ on-task time, play with momentum, develop sustainable record keeping, make interesting presentations, attend to different learning styles, spiral back on previous knowledge and skills, manage with empathy and respect, move purposefully around their classrooms, facilitate student-to-student discussions, use metaphors and counter-examples, play skeptic, respect wait-time, and design learning-full quizzes. Effective instruction is also rooted in understanding your own teaching and learning styles. This course will help you become aware of and more proficient with some of these techniques for delivering effective instruction. This course is designed to complement and enhance your Science Teaching Methods class.

Section A: Jimmy Karlan
Time: Fridays 8:00 – 11:00 am
Maximum: 16
Credits: 3


ESP 530
The Language of Nature

Competency Area: Civic Ecology
Priority to ES students entering Fall 07.

What we know about the environment, how we know it, and who can speak with authority about it, are questions of language as well as science. This course will focus on the power of language in environmental communication. Critical reading of a variety of texts in the history of science, environmental thought, and nature writing will provide a basis for discussion and analysis. Weekly assignments will focus on the development of writing styles and skills.

Section A: Joy Ackerman
Times: Thursdays, 8:30 – 11:00 am
Maximum: 16
(4 seats reserved for 2nd year ES students)
Credits: 3


ES 699A
Master’s Project

Competency areas: CB, RMC & IND – Required for students who are NOT doing a Master’s Thesis; EAO, EE & Cert – Optional, Elective with written permission of program director.

The Master’s Project represents the culmination of a student’s work at Antioch. It differs from the Master’s Thesis in that the Project will typically be more descriptive in focus, and usually will not be defined by formal hypothesis-testing of theoretical concepts. The Master’s Project will often follow standardized approaches used in a student’s chosen field such as development of a regional landuse plan, completion of a natural resource inventory, or preparation of a high school curriculum. Although not to the extent expected for a Thesis, students will be expected to research, develop and defend the methodological approach used in the project. Master’s Projects will be expected to be professional in their presentation, but need not adhere to Antioch’s formal Thesis Guidelines. The goals, content and format of the Master’s Project must be approved by the student’s program director and the ES Department faculty member who has agreed to evaluate the final document; supervision of the Project may involve a qualified person external to the department, or an ES Department faculty member.

Note: CB, RMC and IND students are required to complete either a Masters Project or a Master’s Thesis. See the AUNE Student Handbook or Second Extension form for each semester’s deadlines.

Section A: Jon Atwood
Section B: Peter Palmiotto
Section C: Rachel Thiet
Section D: Jim Jordan
Section E: Beth Kaplin
Section F: Joy Ackerman
Section G: Michael Simpson
Credits: 3


Section Added

 

ES 699C
Master’s Thesis

Competency areas: CB, RMC & IND – Required for students who are NOT doing a Master’s Project.
Prerequisite: Master’s Thesis Seminar
It is recommended that students register for this in their 5th semester.
Note: Students must have written permission from a Thesis Advisor prior to registration.

The Master’s Thesis represents the culmination of a student’s work at Antioch. The Master’s Thesis will typically be more conceptual in focus than the Project, usually will include formal hypothesis-testing of theoretical concepts, and generally will be oriented toward eventual publication of the work in a peer-reviewed professional journal. Students will be expected to develop a thorough review of relevant literature and methodology, and prepare a final manuscript that adheres to Antioch’s Thesis Guidelines. In contrast to the Master’s Project, Master’s Theses require identification of a 3-person committee which must be chaired by an Antioch faculty member; additional committee members will generally be external to the department.

Section A: Jon Atwood
Section B: Peter Palmiotto
Section C: Rachel Thiet
Section D: Jim Jordan
Section E: Beth Kaplin
Section F: Joy Ackerman
Section G: Michael Simpson
Section H: Tom Wessels
Credits: 3


ES 699D
Master’s Thesis Continuation

Required for all students continuing a Master’s Thesis for which they have previously registered.

Students must register for Master’s Thesis Continuation every semester until the thesis has been completed. The Thesis Continuation Progress Report (see Thesis Guidebook) should be submitted to your Thesis Advisor at the time of registration. Enrollment in Master’s Thesis continuation confers half- time status for loan deferment purposes through December 21.

Section A: Jon Atwood
Section B: Peter Palmiotto
Section C: Rachel Thiet
Section D: Jim Jordan
Section E: Beth Kaplin
Section F: Joy Ackerman
Section G: Michael Simpson
Section H: Tom Wessels
Credits: uncredited


ESF 514
New England Flora

Competency Area: Natural Communities
Priority to ES students who entered Fall 06.

This course will be an introduction to the vascular flora of New England with special attention given to fall herbaceous plants and woody plants in winter and summer conditions. The course will cover both plant structure and taxonomy, and will include laboratory and fieldwork.

Section A: Christopher Kane
Time: Fridays, 8:00 – 11:00 am
Maximum: 16
Credits: 3


Instructor and Time Changes

ES 516
Nonprofit Leadership and Management

(formerly Organizational Leadership in the Nonprofit World)
Competency Areas: EAO – Required; CB, EE, Cert, IND & RMC – Elective
Required of and Priority to Environmental Advocacy and Organizing students.

Just as the human body requires healthy organs to function well, a social movement requires well-run organizations. To become effective organizational leaders, people need to develop self-awareness, a healthy and balanced approach to life and work, good listening and communication skills, a keen understanding of group dynamics, and the ability to facilitate productive meetings. Organizational leaders also need to be visionaries who can manage time, money, emotions, and other people competently. This course will focus on such skills and explore how they can be combined to improve our personal effectiveness in creating growing, healthy, and successful organizations. This class will largely be an online reading/discussion course with an intensive weekend workshop or two as well as some weekly student support group meetings.

Section A: Abigail Abrash Walton

Time: Wednesdays, September 5 – December 12, 1:00 – 4:00 pm

Maximum: 16
Credits: 3


ES 515
Organizing Social Movements & Campaigns

Competency Areas EAO – Required; CB, EE, Cert, IND, & RMC – Elective
Required of and Priority to Environmental Advocacy & Organizing students.

Want to learn how to be an effective citizen activist? This class will look at the best strategies and tactics of progressive social movements and campaigns in the United States as well as consider case studies of movements from around the world. Attention will be given to exploring theories of social power, stages of movement mobilization, action strategies, advocacy roles, power-holder responses, and the mechanisms and levels of social movement success. The goal of the course will be to help students see themselves as part of a long activist tradition and reflect on how best to build powerful social movements, win the active support of key sectors of the populace, and achieve campaign objectives even in the face of power-holder opposition. The course will include 20 hours fieldwork and a group strategy-planning project designing a local campaign around a group chosen global climate stabilization objective.

Section A: Steve Chase
Time: Thursdays, 1:00 – 4:00 pm
Maximum: 16
Credits: 3


ESF 515
Ornithology

Competency Area: Natural Communities
Priority to ES students who entered Fall 06.

This course provides an overview of avian evolution, taxonomy, anatomy, behavior and conservation. In addition to occasional local field trips during the regular class time, there will be 1 – 2 all-day weekend trips to be scheduled during the first class meeting. Selections from the PBS series, The Life of Birds will supplement in-class lecture material.

Section A: Jon Atwood
Time: Fridays, 8:00 – 11:00 am
Maximum: 16
Credits: 3


ESP 524
Patterns of Environmental Activism

Competency Area: Civic Ecology
Priority to ES students entering Fall 07:
First Priority to Environmental Advocacy & Organizing students.

Environmentalism is a very broad and diverse social movement, with many different streams and tributaries — some mainstream, some radical, some progressive, and some reactionary. In this course, we will not only explore the diversity of the last four decades of environmental thought and activism in the United States, but also the thoughts and actions of earlier advocates of preserving wildlands, protecting public health, and promoting more sustainable approaches to living on the earth. The goals of the course are to 1) explore the diversity of response thoughtful people have had to the negative environmental consequences of our urban, industrial capitalist society; 2) develop a more critical understanding of the forces arrayed against moving our societies in the direction of greater justice, democracy, environmental protection, public health, and long term sustainability; and 3) identify what each of us can contribute to the future of a renewed environmental movement as professionals, consumers, and citizens.

Section A: Steve Chase
Time: Thursdays, 8:30 – 11:00 am
Maximum: 16
(4 seats saved for 2nd year ES students)
Credits: 3


MEETING DATE/TIME CHANGED

ES 693
Practicum, General
Practicum Seminar

Competency Areas: EAO, CB, Cert, EE, IND & RMC – Required
Practicum Orientation is required for all first year students on either November 8 or 9.

A total of 8 General Practicum credits are required for Environmental Advocacy & Organizing, Conservation Biology, Environmental Education, Resource Management and Conservation and those pursuing Individualized Programs. Students in these programs register for either a 4 or 2 credit practicum; at least one four credit practicum is required during a student’s course of study. A total of 2 General Practicum credits are required for certification majors in addition to 6 credits of Student Teaching. It is strongly recommended that students not register for Practicum until after completing their second semester in the program.

The Practicum provides students with an opportunity to apply, in an organizational setting, what they are learning and to develop professional contacts within their fields of interest. While students are responsible for locating practica, faculty is available to provide support and information as needed. All students are required to attend a scheduled Practicum Orientation during their first semester.

The Practicum Seminar provides a setting in which students can discuss specific issues and concerns, and a format for presenting their accomplished projects. Students will meet privately with the instructor one time during the semester.

Section A: Sarah Bockus
Section B: Kay Delanoy
Section C: Christa Koehler
Section D: Melissa Diven
Section E: Jimmy Karlan
Time: Sections A, B & C: Thursdays,
September 13, November 29 & December 6,
11:15 am – 12:45 pm
Section D: Fridays,
September 14, November 30 & December 7
11:15 am – 12:45 pm
Section E: Fridays,
September 14
1:00 pm – 2:15 pm
December 14
1:00 am – 3:00 pm

Maximum:
Section B: 10
Section C: 12
Section E: 6

All other sections: 15
Credits: variable
(Practicum Seminar credited as part of Practicum)


ESE 521
Problem-Solving & Inquiry-Based Science Teaching

Competency Areas: Cert – Required; EE – Methods Required alternate; EAO, CB, IND & RMC – Elective
Required of and priority to ES Certification students entering Fall 07.

If I told you the answer, those of you still thinking about the problem would probably stop… In the spirit of Catherine Fosnot’s remark, we will explore teaching science in middle and high schools from a problem-solving and inquiry-based mindset.

We will solve problems about problems and inquire into the nature of inquiry. We will experience problem solving and inquiry from the perspectives of learners and teachers. Therefore, whether you are trying to figure out how to lift a classmate with one arm, the engineering of a pneumatic pump, or how to sustain multiple generations of life in a sealed container, we will reflect about the teaching of and learning through problem-solving and inquiry based approaches.

Section A: Jimmy Karlan
Time: Thursdays, 1:00 – 4:00 pm
Maximum: 16
(1 seat reserved for Science Education student)
Credits: 3


Instructor Added

ESACO 503
Proposal Writing and the Grants Process

Competency Areas: RMC – Required alternate to GIS; EE – EE Methods Required alternate; EAO, CB, Cert & IND – Elective
Priority to RMC students who entered Fall 06 and did not take GIS.

This course will focus on gaining competency in the three phases of the grants process: planning, research, and writing. Students will research and explore public and private funding sources appropriate to the human services and environmental fields. The criteria for selecting potential funding sources, the basic elements of a proposal, and developing successful collaborative efforts will be emphasized. Students will interactively engage in each phase of the process and will demonstrate their learning through submission of a proposal abstract and evidence of research in the public and private sectors.

Section A: Don Woodhouse

Time: Thursdays, September 6 – October 25,
5:00 – 8:00 pm
Maximum: 16
Credits: 2


ES 695
Research Practicum

Competency Area: CB, RMC, and IND – Practicum option
Restricted to CB, RMC, and IND students doing research associated with a Masters Thesis.
Students may register for Research Practicum only once during their program. Research Practicum may be for 2 or 4 credits. These credits count toward the required total of 8 Practicum credits. Students doing Master’s Theses are not required to take Research Practicum credits; instead, they may wish to register for General Practicum (ES 693).

Students must have written permission from their Thesis Advisor attached to or on the registration form to sign up for this Research Practicum.

Note: There is no formal seminar for this practicum; however, the student is expected to meet regularly with their Thesis Advisor.

Section A: Jon Atwood
Section B: Peter Palmiotto
Section C: Rachel Thiet
Section D: Jim Jordan
Section E: Beth Kaplin
Section F: Joy Ackerman
Section G: Michael Simpson
Maximum: 5 per section
Credits: 2 or 4


MEETING TIME CLARIFIED

ESE 520
Science Teaching Methods

Competency Areas: Cert – Required; EE – EE Methods Required alternate; EAO, CB, IND & RMC – Elective
Required of and Priority to ES Certification students who entered Fall 06.

Science Teaching Methods is designed to help prepare students to effectively teach science at the middle or high school level. The course takes place at Compass School, an independent middle and high school in Westminster, VT (25 minutes from Antioch). Participants will have the opportunity to observe experienced teachers in action and to interact with middle and high school students, using these interactions as a forum for discovery, growth, and practice of teaching methods. We will practice classroom management strategies, communication techniques, curriculum design, lesson planning, assessment, and lab methods and safety. Participants will be encouraged to reflect on their learning through discussion, written reflections, and optional videotaping of teaching experiences.

Section A: Steve Holmes
Time: Thursdays, September 6, 1:00 – 4:00 pm at Antioch, Compass School location beginning September 13

Maximum: 16
Credits: 3


ES 690

SIS: Supervised Independent Study

If you are planning an independent study, please register for an SIS on your registration form; however, an SIS contract must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office by December 1, 2007 in order for it to appear on your schedule or transcript. Please be sure to specify on the contract if the SIS will be used to fulfill a competency area or serve as a required course substitute, or as an elective. Contracts received after the December 1st deadline will be returned to you for registration in a subsequent semester (additional costs may apply). Credits will not appear on your schedule until the SIS contract(s) has been submitted to the Registrar’s Office, thus affecting your enrollment status and perhaps your financial aid eligibility.

Credits: Variable


ESP 605
Social Aspects of Conservation and Development: Critique and Practice

Competency Areas: Civic Ecology
Priority to ES students entering in Fall 07.

This course examines international conservation and development from a critical social science perspective that questions prevailing assumptions and institutions, foregrounds power, politics, and social justice, and seeks to mobilize critique in service of enlightened practice. The course begins with an overview of approaches to qualitative social analysis (history, anthropology, geography, political ecology) and proceeds to a detailed investigation of three regional case studies, including tropical forests in the Amazon Basin, temperate forests of the northeastern U.S., and the Himalaya of central Asia. We will focus on understanding 1) the interactions between social groups at various scales (e.g., communities, NGOs, the state, multilateral institutions), 2) the concepts and paradigms that shape our understandings of these dynamics and of specific ‘problems’ and ‘solutions’, and 3) specific social and ecological outcomes of different types of interventions. The course is thus simultaneously empirical and reflective, a combination that is necessary if we are to grasp the wider implications of our own professional interventions.

Section A: Dan Smith
Time: Thursdays, 8:30 – 11:00 am
Maximum: 16
(4 seats reserved for any 2nd yr ES student)
Credits: 3


MEETING DATE CHANGED

ESE 522
Teaching Exceptional Children: Focus on Adolescence

Competency Areas: Cert – Required; EE – EE Methods Required alternate; EAO, CB, IND & RMC – Elective
Required of and Priority to ES Certification students.

Adolescent children and those with special needs present the classroom teacher with a wide variety of challenges in terms of management, motivation, and relationships. This course is designed to familiarize the student with special educational needs of adolescents who have a range of cognitive, physical or emotionally handicapping conditions. Related topics that will be covered include: Special Education (legal) requirements within school systems; developmental issues; the Individual Education Plan (IEP); curriculum adaptations; and issues in mainstreaming and normalization.

Section A: Jean Nolan
Time: Thursdays, September 6 & 20, October 18 & 25, November 1, 15, & 29, and December 6 & 13,

5:00 – 8:00 pm
Maximum: 16
(1 seat reserved for Science Education student)
Credits: 2


ESP 555
Waste Management

Competency Areas: RMC – Environmental Policy elective; EAO, CB, EE, Cert & IND- Elective
Note: This 2 credit course does NOT fulfill the Civic Ecology requirement
Prerequisites: There are no specific prerequisites, however some knowledge of topics on hydrology, soils and groundwater can complement the information provided in this course.
Priority to RMC students.

This course approaches the subject from an integrated waste management perspective, in other words, handling the different components of the waste stream in the most efficient, economical and environmentally appropriate manner. Students are introduced to the concepts of systems analysis, materials balances, lifecycle assessment and the economic ramifications of deciding whether to reuse, recycle or dispose of materials.

Topics will also include new legislative initiatives around the U.S. regulatory environment. Students will have the opportunity through a term project to apply concepts learned in class to current solid waste management issues in the public or private sector and to utilize Excel to demonstrate economic viability of alternatives.

Section A: Michael Simpson
Time Thursdays, November 1 – 15 and
November 29 – December 13, 8:00 – 11:00 am, and Saturday, November 10 , 9:00 am – 4:00 pm
Maximum: 15
Credits: 2


CLASS CANCELLED

(students interested may pursue an SIS with instructor; will meet as a group 10/12 and 12/7, 1:00