Environmental Studies Courses Summer 2006

Master’s Programs
Doctoral Program (Ph.D)


Master’s Programs


ESF 525
Alpine Flora

Competency Areas: Natural Communities II
First priority to ES students; second priority to Science Education students.

Please Note: Attendance at ALL pre-trip meetings is mandatory. Enrolled students who fail to drop the course at least 1 week before the first pre-trip meeting or who fail to attend the first pre-trip meeting will be held financially responsible for the cost of the trip and will forfeit their seat in the class. Students on the waitlist are strongly encouraged to attend the first class.

This course focuses on the flora of the alpine zone, specifically that of the Presidential Range of New Hampshire. Students will explore plant adaptations along two environmental gradients above timberline, and learn to recognize eight different alpine plant communities. Species distribution and dominance will be assessed through plot work; the effect of anthropogenic disturbance will be reviewed as well. Two pre-trip classes will introduce us to the concepts studied on the slopes of Mt. Adams and Mt. Madison. Total cost to participants is $150.00 (includes camping, food & miscellaneous expenses).

Note: This trip involves a fairly strenuous backpack up to our cabin at tree line. Students should be in good physical shape.

Section A: TBA
Changed 04/20/06 to: Section A: Laura Alexander
Time: Pre-trip meetings,
Thursdays, June 22 & July 6, 6:30 – 9:00 pm and Sunday – Friday, July 16 – 21 (Study trip)
Maximum: 9
Credits: 2


ESS 564
Biological Concepts

Competency Areas: Cert – Required; EE – EE Methods; CB, EAO, IND & RMA – Elective
Required of and Priority to ES Teacher Certification students.
Prerequisite: Introductory Biology

This course is designed for students who have already taken introductory biology as undergraduates. It is meant to review in greater depth basic concepts of molecular and cellular biology and will be particularly useful for students seeking certification in biology. Topics to be covered include: biochemistry, cellular structure, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, mitosis and meiosis, classical genetics, molecular genetics, protein synthesis and genic control.

Section A: TBA
Time: Thursdays, June 8 – July 13, 1:30 – 5:45 pm
Maximum: 14
Changed 05/10/06 to: Maximum 16
Credits: 2


ESF 556
Ecology and Adaptation of Small Mammals

COURSE CANCELLED 05/10/06
Competency Areas: Natural Communities II

This course will discuss identification, natural history, behavior, physiology, and ecology of small mammals. Adaptations enhancing survivorship of non-hibernating small mammals in northern environments will be emphasized. Students will employ live-trapping-mark-recapture methods, fluorescent pigment tracing and radio-telemetry to monitor activity and habitat selection of small mammals residing in southern New Hampshire. A field research project will be conducted by each student.

Cost: $50 will cover materials.
Changed 04/01/06: There will be no additional materials cost.

Section A: Joseph Merritt
Time: Saturday – Tuesday, June 10 – 13,
8:30 am – 4:30 pm, and TBA evening, 6:00 – 9:00 pm
Location: Harris Center
Maximum: 16
(1 seat reserved for Science Ed student)
Credits: 2


ESE 541
Environmental Education Methods: Developing Sense of Place

COURSE CANCELLED 05/10/06
Competency Areas: EE – Methods Required Alternate; CB, EAO, Cert, IND & RMA – Elective
Priority to ES Environmental Education students.

Place-based education and sense of place are catch phrases in, and the foundation for, much current environmental education. What do these phrases mean? Is sense of place nurtured and learned or is it intrinsic, somehow derived from innate potential, a fundamental part of what it means to be human? How can we, as environmental educators, help our students develop sense of place, and what relationships may there be between placed-based education, sense of place, and community? Given that the average person in the U.S. will move at least twelve times in his/her life (U.S. Census Bureau), how can we help children (and adults) develop sense of place which may be sustained and revitalized throughout their lives? How do we do this in the face of 21st century globalization and homogenization of cultures? We will consider these questions as we explore the value and challenges of place-based education, using Keene and its environs as our place of study. You will be asked to reflect on your own sense of place in coming to terms with what is possible in formal and informal educational settings with regard to helping students develop sense of place. The culmination of your work will be the creation of curriculum that integrates course concepts with your personal goals as an environmental educator. Three or four classes in this course will be at places other than Antioch, each less than a half-hour walk or drive from AUNE.

Section A: Sue Gentile
Time: Fridays, June 9 – July 14,
8:00 am – 12:15 pm
Maximum: 16
(1 seat reserved for Science Ed student)
Credits: 2


ESE 523A
Environmental Education Methods: Teaching in the Outdoors

Competency Areas: EE – Methods Required Alternate; CB, EAO, Cert, IND & RMA – Elective
Priority to ES Environmental Education students.

A large majority of environmental education takes place outside the school arena. A traditional setting for environmental education includes outdoor, adventure, and wilderness education. This course will provide opportunities to learn and practice techniques for teaching in a variety of outdoor contexts. Special emphasis will be placed on combining adventure education and environmental education in the design of integrated experiences.

Section A: Brad Daniel
Time: Saturday, Sunday, Tuesday & Wednesday, July 8, 9, 11 & 12, 9:00 am – 2:00 pm
** Monday, July 10 only, the class will meet from 5:00 -10:30 pm for an organized night hike.
Maximum: 16
Changed 04/27/06 to: Maximum: 14
(1 seat reserved for Science Ed student)
Credits: 2


ESE 500
Environmental Education Methods:
Using Residential Sites for Sustainability Education and Place-Based Research

Competency Areas: EE – Methods Required Alternate; EAO, CB, Cert, IND & RMA – Elective
Priority to ES Environmental Education students.

Please Note: Attendance at ALL pre-trip meetings is mandatory. Enrolled students who fail to drop the course at least 1 week before the first pre-trip meeting or who fail to attend the first pre-trip meeting will be held financially responsible for the cost of the trip and will forfeit their seat in the class. Students on the waitlist are strongly encouraged to attend the first class.

This course will study the effectiveness of residentially based environmental education. We will be using the Teton Science School in Kelly, Wyoming as a study site. This organization offers a range of progressive residential programming opportunities which include two diverse venues, one an outdoor ecologically-oriented research approach and one a sustainable, place-based school setting. We will examine how they have devised a programmatic infrastructure to address the challenges and opportunities of residential environmental education. We will also explore their delivery model, the organization and management of residential facilities, and the explicit and hidden educational elements of 24-hour programming. While the course discussion topics will focus on residential environmental education, we will also focus on other aspects of environmental education, non-profit organizational management, field biology/ecology, conservation, place-based instruction and sustainability topics. One on-campus three-day intensive will prepare this class for a 5-day exploration of the Teton Science School and the Journey School campus. The cost is $500, which will include: food and lodging, and on-site instruction. Students will be responsible for arranging their own transportation.

Section A: April Landale
Time: Pre-trip meeting, Thursday, April 13,
7:00 – 9:00 pm, and Tuesday – Wednesday, May 30 – June 7 (Study trip)
Changed 04/20/06 to: Time: Pre-trip Meeting TBA; study trip, Tuesday – Monday, May 30 – June 5
Location: Pre-trip meetings – Antioch, Keene;
Study trip – Teton Science School, Kelly, Wyoming
Maximum: 10
Credits: 2
Changed 04/20/06 to: Credits: 3


ESE 505
Environmental Physics for Educators

Competency Areas: Cert: Elective and meets physics prerequisite; EE – Methods Required Alternate; CB, EAO, Cert, IND & RMA – Elective

Environmental Physics for Educators exposes students to the connection between the tenets of modern physics and the natural world. The course emphasizes concepts that help make sense of natural phenomena. Our emphasis is on understanding and appreciating one’s environment from a new perspective. Some topics examined with this new frame of reference will include connecting Newton’s Laws, vectors and projectiles, momentum and collisions, work and energy, circular, satellite and rotational motion, static electricity, relativity, waves, sound and light to our natural and human built environments.

Section A: Jake McDermott
Time: Monday – Wednesday, June 26 – 28 and Wednesday, July 5, 8:00 am – 2:30 pm
Maximum: 16
Credits: 2


ESF 547
Field Entomology: Butterflies and Other Insects

Competency Areas: Natural Communities II

An introduction to common insects, especially those in New England. The first class has students participating in an annual butterfly census in the Berkshires of Massachusetts. Taxonomy of major insect orders, identification of New England butterflies, behavior of selected species, ecological roles, and coevolution with other organisms are emphasized during the sessions.

Section A: Tom Tyning
Time: Sunday, July 16, 8:00 am – 4:30 pm at Bartholomew’s Cobble in Ashley Falls, MA and
Monday – Thursday, July 17 – 20, 8:30 am – 4:30 pm at Antioch
Location: Ashley Falls, MA, and AUNE
Maximum: 16
Changed 04/27/06 to: Maximum: 14
(1 seat reserved for Science Ed student)
Credits: 2


ESS 558
Forest Ecosystem Analysis

Competency Areas: CB – Required Alternate; EAO, EE, Cert, IND & RMA – Elective
Priority to Conservation Biology majors.
Prerequisites: Community Ecology of the NE Landscape or written permission of instructor attached to or on registration form.

Please Note: Attendance at ALL pre-trip meetings is mandatory. Enrolled students who fail to drop the course at least 1 week before the first pre-trip meeting or who fail to attend the first pre-trip meeting will be held financially responsible for the cost of the trip and will forfeit their seat in the class. Students on the waitlist are strongly encouraged to attend the first class.

The objectives of this course are for students to become familiar with the methodology, benefits, and challenges of conducting ecosystem-level studies. On Mt. Moosilauke and at Hubbard Brook in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, students will become familiar with the ecology of spruce-fir and northern hardwood forests through experiential learning comprised of field observations, field research and data analysis. Students will focus on field and analytical methods used to quantify species composition, structure, history, and the nutrient status of forested ecosystems. Techniques will include plot sampling, dendrochronology, and the development of nutrient budgets. Course fee: $160 for food and lodging.

Note: Course involves moderately strenuous mountain day hiking and bunk house living.

Section A: Peter Palmiotto
Time: Pre-trip meetings, Thursdays, June 8 & 15, 6:00 – 9:00 pm and
Saturday – Wednesday, June 24 – 28, 8:00 am – 10:00 pm (Study trip)
Maximum: 16
Credits: 2


ESX 601
Group Dynamics & Leadership I

Competency Areas: RMA – Required Alternate; EE – EE Methods; CB, EAO, Cert & IND – Elective
Note: Deadline for adding this class is June 1.

This course will focus on group development, group dynamics, and leadership. The course introduces students to elements of group dynamics and to a model that matches leadership styles to stages of group development. Students work in teams during the course and use course concepts to analyze their experience. Skills emphasized are group leadership and membership skills, group observation and feedback, conflict management, and managing diversity in groups. Students are expected to read The One Minute Manager Builds High Performing Teams by Blanchard, Carew and Parisi-Carew before the first class meeting. Special emphasis will be placed on case studies in the environmental field.

Section A: Steve Guerriero
Time: Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday, June 5, 6 and 7, 8:30 am – 5:45 pm
Maximum: 18
Changed 04/27/06 to: Maximum: 16
(4 seats reserved for O&M students,
(1 seat reserved for Science Ed student)
Credits: 2


ESF 511
Herpetology

Competency Areas: Natural Communities II

Reptiles and amphibians pose several conservation challenges. We know many of the habitat attributes that herps depend on (networks of vernal pools for migratory salamanders, mosaics of uplands and diverse wetlands for freshwater turtles). But still many questions remain. What size area is necessary to support a given population? How far do individuals move in one season, or in a lifetime? In this course, we will examine the habitat needs of northeast herps. On local field trips, we will learn to identify calls and egg masses of common amphibians. We will swamp-walk in turtle habitats and visit their nesting grounds. We will develop an understanding of the potential for herps to direct landscape-level conservation efforts in the northeast.

Section A: Susie Fowle Schroeder
Times: Thursdays, 8:00 am – 12:15 pm
Maximum: 14
(1 seat reserved for Science Ed student)
Credits: 2


ESP 520
Implementing Sustainability at the Community Scale

Competency Areas: RMA – ESP elective; EE – EE Methods, CB, EAO, Cert, IND – Elective

This course is a 5 day intensive field study trip where students will examine the applied implementation of sustainability initiatives across a variety of dimensions at the community scale. Students will visit a selected community (Ithaca, NY in 2006) and investigate ongoing sustainability initiatives. Types of initiatives to be covered include affordable housing, food production and distribution, green building design, transportation alternatives, land development and conservation, water use and waste water treatment, green house gas mitigation, alternative energy models, alternative economic models, sustainable business models, educating for sustainability and planning for sustainability. Course fee: approximately $350 includes food, camping fees and transportation.

Section A: Pete Throop
Times: Pre-trip meetings, Fridays, June 9 & 23, 6:30 – 9:30 pm and
Saturday – Wednesday, July 8 – 12 (Study trip)
Changed 04/20/06 to: Time: Pre-trip meetings Thursday, May 11, 7:30 – 8:30 pm and TBA, and study trip, Saturday – Wednesday, June 24 – 28
Maximum: 12
Credits: 2


ESP 599
Land Protection and Stewardship

Competency Areas: RMA – ESP elective; EE – EE Methods, CB, EAO, Cert, IND – Elective

This course is designed to provide students with an exposure to all aspects of land protection transactions. Emphasis will be placed on providing a context for land protection, developing an understanding of the tools of the trade, tax benefits to the landowner, site assessment, developing and completing the real estate transaction, and stewardship of protected lands.

Section A: Pete Throop
Time: Saturdays & Sundays, June 17 & 18 and July 15 & 16, 8:30 am – 4:30 pm
Changed 04/20/06 to: Time: Saturdays & Sundays, June 17 & 18, 8:30 am – 4:30 pm and July 14, 6:00 – 9:00 pm, and July 15, 8:30 am – 4:30 pm; optional day in the field on July 16, 8:30 am – 4:30 pm
Maximum: 16
Credits: 2


ESF 542
Marine Ornithology

Competency Areas: Natural Communities II

Please Note: Attendance at ALL pre-trip meetings is mandatory. Enrolled students who fail to drop the course at least 1 week before the first pre-trip meeting or who fail to attend the first pre-trip meeting will be held financially responsible for the cost of the trip and will forfeit their seat in the class. Students on the waitlist are strongly encouraged to attend the first class.

Spectacular colonies of nesting seabirds and large flocks of migrating shorebirds are some of the more fascinating aspects of New England’s avifauna. In their courtship and nesting behaviors, their abilities to find food in seemingly featureless landscapes, and their immense migratory journeys, marine birds exhibit incredible adaptations to a unique environment. During this 5-day field study trip to Cape Cod we’ll go on a whale-watching trip to Stellwagen Bank, visit a colony of nesting terns, look for migrating shorebirds, and learn to see the world through the eyes of a marine bird. Course fee: approximately $250 + food (includes boat trips, campground fees, gasoline costs).

Section A: MaryLou Soczek
Time: Pre-trip meetings, Fridays June 16 & July 7,6:30 – 9:30 pm and
Saturday – Wednesday, July 22 – 26 (Study trip)
Maximum: 10
Credits: 2


ES 699C
Master’s Thesis

Required for all CB students; optional for EAO, IND, & RMA students.
Prerequisite: Master’s Thesis Seminar and written permission from the thesis advisor attached to or on registration form.
It is recommended that students register for Master’s Thesis in their 5th semester.

As a culmination of a student’s work at Antioch, the Master’s Thesis should reflect the student’s particular focus of study and future professional interest. This effort will include a central research component associated with it. The research can be quantitative, qualitative or literary in nature. All Environmental Studies students are required to have approval from their advisor prior to entering the Master’s Thesis process.

Section A: Jon Atwood
Section B: Peter Palmiotto
Section C: Rachel Thiet
Section D: Jim Jordan
Section E: Meade Cadot
Maximum: 5 per section
Credits: 3


ES 699D
Master’s Thesis Continuation

Required for all students continuing a Master’s Thesis for which they have previously registered.

Students must register for Master’s Thesis Continuation every semester until the thesis has been completed and signed off by your Master’s Thesis reader. Enrollment in Master’s Thesis continuation confers half-time status for Financial Aid and loan deferment purposes through July 23.

Section A: ES Faculty
Maximum: 20
Credits: uncredited


ESS 562
Natural Resource Inventory: Wildlife

Competency Areas: CB – Required Alternate to NRI Vegetation; EAO, EE, Cert, IND & RMA – Elective
Priority to Conservation Biology students.

What are the techniques we use to assess wildlife distribution and abundance? What are the components of a well-rounded natural resource inventory? This newly designed NRI course will focus on describing and mapping habitat types, as well as provide an overview of major techniques used in conducting surveys for birds, amphibians, reptiles, mammals and arthropods. The course will review the basics of developing investigation plans, discuss use of GPS and compass, and provide examples of aerial photo interpretation. The course format will combine afternoon lectures followed by morning field work, as well as individual student work outside of formal class meetings.

Section A: Jon Atwood
Time: Thursdays, June 8 – July 13, 1:30 – 4:30 pm and
Fridays, June 9 – July 14, 8:00 am – 12:15 pm
Maximum: 16
Changed 04/27/06 to: Maximum: 14
Credits: 3


ES 693
Practicum, General

Competency Area: CB, EAO, EE, Cert, IND & RMA – Required
A total of 8 Practicum credits are REQUIRED for all Conservation Biology, Environmental Education, Environmental Advocacy, Individualized and RMA majors. A total of 2 General Practicum credits are REQUIRED for Certification majors. It is strongly RECOMMENDED that students not register for Practicum until after completing their second semester in the program.

The Practicum provides students with an opportunity to apply, in an organizational setting, what they are learning and to develop professional contacts within their fields of interest. While students are responsible for locating practica, faculty is available to provide support and information as needed. All students are required to attend a scheduled PRACTICUM ORIENTATION during their first semester.

Note: Seminars are not required for the summer session; however, one seminar is highly recommended for students for whom this is the first practicum, either on Thursday, June 8 or Friday, June 9. The seminars will be held 12:30 to 1:15, and will take the place of one of the interim reports required in the summer.

Section A: Katherine Delanoy
Section B: Paul Bocko
Section C: Jack Calhoun
Section D: Duncan Watson
Section E: Sarah Bockus
Section F: Sue Weller
Maximum: 15 per section
Credits: variable


ES 695
Research Practicum

Competency Area: CB, RMA, and IND – Practicum option
Restricted to CB, RMA, and IND students doing a masters thesis and who are doing thesis research as their practicum
Students may register for 2 or 4 credits which will count toward the total of 8 Practicum credits.

Students must have written permission from thesis advisor attached to or on registration form to sign up for this practicum.

Note: There is no formal seminar for this practicum, however the student is expected to meet regularly with their thesis advisor.

Section A: Jon Atwood
Section B: Rachel Thiet
Section C: Peter Palmiotto
Section D: Tom Wessels
Section E: Michael Simpson
Section F: Joy Ackerman
Maximum: 5 per section
Credits: variable


ES 690U
SIS: Special Project

Competency areas: RMA & IND – Required for students not doing a Masters Thesis; EAO, EE & Cert – Optional, Elective

The Special Project will be conducted as a supervised independent study. As a culmination of a student’s work at Antioch, the Special Project is comparable to a master’s thesis in scope, but differs in that it is not focused on research design. The Special Project follows standardized approaches used in a student’s chosen field such as a solid waste plan, a curriculum development plan, or a marketing plan. The Special Project’s content and format must be approved by both the student’s advisor and program chair, but may be supervised by a qualified person external to the department.

Note: RMA Students are required to complete either a Special Project or a Master’s Thesis.

Please register for this SIS on your registration form. However, an SIS contract must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office by July 10, 2006 in order for it to appear on your schedule or transcript. Please be sure to specify on the contract if the SIS will be used to fulfill a competency area or serve as a required course substitute, or as an elective. Contracts received after the July 10th deadline will be returned and registration required in the subsequent semester (additional costs may apply). Credits will not appear on your schedule until the SIS contract(s) has been submitted to the Registrar’s Office, thus affecting your enrollment status and perhaps your financial aid eligibility.

Section A: Michael Simpson
Maximum: 15
Credits: 3


ES 690

SIS: Supervised Individual Study

If you are planning an independent study, please register for an SIS on your registration form. However, an SIS contract must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office by July 10, 2006 in order for it to appear on your schedule or transcript. Please be sure to specify on the contract if the SIS will be used to fulfill a competency area or serve as a required course substitute, or as an elective. Contracts received after the July 10th deadline will be returned and registration required in the subsequent semester (additional costs may apply). Credits will not appear on your schedule until the SIS contract(s) has been submitted to the Registrar’s Office, thus affecting your enrollment status and perhaps your financial aid eligibility.

Credits: variable


ESS 546
Soils: Mapping and Interpretation

Competency Areas: RMA – Biosphere Science; CB, EAO, EE, Cert & IND – Elective
Competency Area Corrected 04/20/06: Competency Areas: RMA – ESS elective, CB, EAO, EE, Cert & IND – Elective
Priority to RMA students.

This course focuses on soil-landscape relationships and the applications of soil science to land use and management issues. We will cover soil formation processes, soil taxonomy, and soil classifications of the U.S.D.A., emphasizing mapping conventions and the evolution of soils at parcel to landscape scales. State and federal standards developed for assessing soils will be reviewed in the context of different land uses.

Section A: Jim Jordan
Times: Saturday – Tuesday, June 3 – 6, 8:30 am – 4:30 pm
Maximum: 14
Credits: 2


ESP 549
Water Resource Policy

Competency Areas: RMA