Education Psychology Courses Spring 2006

Experienced Educators Program
Integrated Learning & Waldorf Program


Experienced Educators Program


EDP 599
Action Research & Educational Change

Competency Area: Education & Social Policy
Section A: Pembroke NH Cluster 2005
Section B: Springfield VT Cluster 2005
Restricted to Experienced Educator students; others by written permission of Program Director attached to or on registration form.

This course will introduce students to the theory and strategies behind action research and will enable them to begin work on selecting an appropriate topic for their Master’s Projects and to develop a proposal for their project. Strategies for framing a question, collecting data and determining samples will be part of the discussion. Methods of quantitative and qualitative research will be discussed and the relationship of purpose to method examined. Emphasis will be on the living changing nature of qualitative research during the process of developing the Master’s Project Proposal.

Section A: Pembroke NH Cluster 2005: Peter Eppig
Section B: Springfield VT Cluster 2005: Tom Julius
Time: Fridays, January 13, February 10, and
March 10, 4:30 – 8:30 pm and
Saturdays, January 14, February 11, and March 11, 9:00 – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 18 per section
Credits: 2


EDP 632
Action Research & Educational Change

Competency Area: Education & Social Policy
Restricted to Experienced Educators School Choice 2006 Cluster; others by written permission of Program Director attached to or on registration form.

This course will introduce students to the theory and strategies behind action research. Students will work on selecting an appropriate topic related to their Master’s Projects and will develop a research proposal. We will discuss strategies for framing a question and for designing a research plan – examining the relationships between method and purpose. Emphasis will be on the dynamic nature of qualitative research and the role it can play in the educational change process.

Section C: School Choice Cluster 2006:
Susan Dreyer Leon
Changed 04/19/06 to: Section C: Peter Eppig
Time: Fridays, April 7 & 28, and May 19,
4:30 – 8:30 pm, and
Saturdays, April 8 & 29, and May 20,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 18
Credits: 2


EDP 600
Contemporary Social & Political Issues in Education

Competency Area: Education & Social Policy
Section A: Pembroke NH Cluster 2005
Section B: Springfield VT Cluster 2005
Restricted to Experienced Educator students; others by written permission of Program Director attached to or on registration form.

This course will look at the context for schooling in America in the twenty-first and latter half of the twentieth centuries. We will look at the relationship between what is happening in society and public education; we will also look at the forces both within and outside the school that direct and constrain the process of education. We will pay particular attention to the role of the teacher in the patterns of teaching, learning, determining curricula and governance that characterize schools.

Section A: Pembroke NH Cluster 2005: Laura Thomas
Section B: Springfield VT Cluster 2005: Judy Coven
Time: Fridays, April 7 & 21, and May 19,
4:30 – 8:30 pm and
Saturdays, April 8 & 22, and May 20,
9:00 – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 18 per section
Credits: 2


EDC 520
Curriculum Theory and Application

Competency Area: Curriculum and Instruction
Restricted to Experienced Educators School Choice Cluster 2005. Others by written permission of the Program Director attached to or on the registration form.

This course will include an exploration of curriculum theory and practice from the classroom to the district and state levels. We will examine historical and modern conceptions of curriculum theory, curriculum design, and curriculum implementation. Given all we know about the world inside and outside the school, we will both individually and as a group: 1) articulate what is quality curriculum, 2) determine how to design curriculum to achieve desired results, 3) produce exemplars of curriculum that make these ideas concrete and practical. During class sessions we will engage in large group discussion, small group work, individual reflection, and curriculum design.

Section G: School Choice Cluster 2005: Tom Julius
Time: Fridays, January 27, February 24, March 24, April 28, and May 19,
4:30 – 8:30 and
Saturdays, January 28, February 25, March 25,
April 29, and May 20,
Changed 12/01/05 to: Dates: Fridays, January 27, February 24, March 24 & April 28,4:30 – 8:30 pm;

and Saturdays, January 28, February 25, March 25 & April 29, 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 18
Credits: 3


EDT 611
Learning Theory

Competency Area: Theoretical and Philosophical Foundations of Education
Restricted to Experienced Educators School Choice Cluster 2006; others by written permission of Program Director attached to or on registration form.

How do children think and learn? What is intelligence? What is the role of emotion in education? How do biology and the environment interact to create a unique human mind? Developmental theories abound – Piaget, Vygotsky, Erikson, Kohlberg, Kegan, Gilligan. Some models describe broad stages of development that clump a range of human characteristics. Recent work has been focused more narrowly on the unfolding of a single skill or trait. Learning has been variably ascribed to information processing, cognitive processes, constructivism, and social constructivism. Are there theories and models that can effectively guide us in our approach to teaching? How do we best support our students as they develop, mature, and gain knowledge, skills, and understanding?

Section C: School Choice Cluster 2006:
Susan Dreyer Leon
Time: Fridays, January 20, February 10, and
March 10, 4:30 – 8:30 pm and
Saturdays, January 21, February 11, and March 11, 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 18
Credits: 2


ED 699B
Master’s Project I

Required of all finishing students in the Keene Cluster 2004.
Restricted to students who have completed EDP 599 Educational Research.

The Master’s Project is a year long project of the student’s own choosing. Projects are expected to contribute to the improvement of educational practice, and may have either a research or a developmental focus. Each student must make a public presentation of the project in a symposium before the end of the program. In the past, symposia have consisted of workshops for other teachers, presentations to school boards or parents, discussions in staff meetings or with seminar participants. Projects may incorporate any variety of media, such as videotapes, slides, pictures, but must also have a written manuscript to accompany them. Students will complete their Projects in the Master’s Project II course in the summer semester.

Section F: Keene Cluster 2004
Credits: 2


ED 699C
Master’s Project Continuation

Students who have completed coursework must register for a Master’s Project continuation every semester until the project has been completed and signed off by the Master’s Project reader. Enrollment in Master’s Project continuation confers half-time status for Financial Aid and loan deferment purposes through May 12, 2006.

Section A: Education Faculty
Credits: uncredited


ED 699S
Master’s Project Seminar

Restricted to Experienced Educator students; others by written permission of Program Director attached to on registration form.

The Master’s Project seminar is designed to assist teachers with the action research process through collegial critique and advice. The seminar will be used for piloting activities, for sharing concerns and emerging theory, and for reflecting upon both the process and the content of what teachers are learning through their research. Special strategies for data collection and analysis will be explored.

Section F: Keene Cluster 2004: Peter Eppig
Time: Saturdays, January 28, March 25, and April 29, 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 15
Credits: 1


ED 693C
Practicum

Practicum Seminar

The purpose of the Practicum is to assist students in integrating theoretical knowledge gained through reading and seminars with their experience as teachers. During this Practicum semester students will be completing their Practicum portfolios. The emphasis in the Practicum is upon self-evaluation, reflection, and articulation of experience. Students may call on faculty consultants for particular assistance with classroom practices. A reflective journal is required of all students, and at least one visit to another classroom; an annotated bibliography and a sustained observation of a student are also required. One hour of the monthly core course meetings will be devoted to practicum-related issues, such as discussion of classroom practice, reflective journal writing, and theoretical applications to teaching.

Section A: Pembroke NH Cluster 2005: Staff
Section B: Springfield VT Cluster 2005: Staff
Time: TBA
Credits: 2


ED 693E
Practicum
Practicum Seminar – Leadership for Change

Restricted to Experienced Educators School Choice Cluster 2005.

This practicum is designed explore students’ roles as leaders in their schools, school districts and in relation to implementing their change project. We will identify qualities of effective leadership and strategies for building leadership capacity in oneself and others. Students will engage in taking leadership roles, reflect and write about their developing leadership skills, interview leaders they admire, and become knowledgeable about current leadership theory. Practicum work for this semester will culminate in a plan for building leadership capacity to implement a change project in the student’s school.

Section G: School Choice Cluster 2005: Staff
Time: TBA
Credits: 3


ED 693D
Practicum
Practicum Seminar – Organizational Case Study

Restricted to Experienced Educators School Choice Cluster 2006

The practicum seminar is designed to allow students to explore school change and/or school choice issues in their education setting. Using a variety of research methodologies, including surveys, interviews, and observations, students will collect data about their setting and use this information to reflect upon the issues facing their school communities. These reflections will include analyses of formal organizational structures, informal power relationships and the roles played by the many constituents making up a school environment. Practicum work for this term will culminate in a case study that presents the collected data with an eye towards beginning to define the work that students might want to undertake for their masters project.

Section C: School Choice Cluster 2006: Staff
Time: TBA
Credits: 2


EDC 641A
Professional Standards Portfolio II

Competency Area: Curriculum & Instruction
Required of all finishing students in the Keene Cluster 2004.

This course represents the culmination of students’ work begun in the summer semester course EDC 641 Professional Standards Portfolio. Time will be devoted during the Master’s Project seminar to completing this work. Some of the coursework will also be done online. Participants will reflect on their professional strengths and weaknesses, and engage in collegial critiques of portfolios. Proficiencies may be defined from national, state or district-created standards.

Section F: Keene Cluster 2004: Peter Eppig
Time: TBA
Maximum: 15
Credits: 1


ED 690
SIS: Supervised Independent Study

If you are planning an independent study, please register for an SIS on your registration form; however, an SIS contract may be submitted to the Registrar’s Office by April 20, 2006, in order for it to appear on your schedule or transcript. Please be sure to specify on the contract if the SIS will be used to fulfill a competency area or serve as a required course substitute, or as an elective. Contracts received after the April 20th deadline will be returned to you for registration in a subsequent semester (additional costs may apply). Credits will not appear on your schedule until the SIS contract(s) has been submitted to the Registrar’s Office, thus affecting your enrollment status and perhaps your financial aid eligibility.

Credits: variable


Integrated Learning & Waldorf Program


EDC 661
Backyard Weather Predicting

Competency Area: Curriculum & Instruction

Did you ever wonder how the weather pundits forecast the weather? Could YOU learn to predict the weather accurately? Yes you can – using a few simple tools, charts, and your eyes. This course will give you the background knowledge for effectively teaching about clouds, air masses, weather fronts, weather maps, humidity, dew point, wind direction, wind speed, and why and how the weather changes. In addition you will learn how to set up a simple weather station, how to use on-line information to supplement your own observations, and how to teach students how to observe, record, and predict the weather at your location. Talk about site-based learning! Whether you want to satisfy your own curiosity or satisfy your state’s curriculum frameworks, this course will teach you the basics of meteorology and how to unlock the secrets of backyard weather predicting. This course is most suited for educators working with students in grades 3 – 12.

Section A: Molly Flower Eppig
Time: Thursdays, March 30 – May 11,
6:30 – 8:30 pm
Maximum: 18
Credits: 1


EDP 631
Behind the Label:
A Deeper Look at Diagnosis and Toxic Stress in the Lives of Children

Competency Area: Education & Social Policy

As we seek to understand our children and adolescents, an ever-increasing number of them are being tested and diagnosed with a range of learning and behavioral disorders. How can we create safety in a world that threatens to overwhelm? How can we create a daily balance between calming and arousal? As we look deeper into the issues that confront our children we may glimpse how, in helping them penetrate the difficulties that face them each day, they are gathering and refining the tools they need. What is the difference between naming and labeling? In this course we will journey from the neurological to the practical. We will challenge the hard wired principle that so often leads to medication. We will explore a classroom and family-based response to many of the common diagnoses such as Attention Priority Issues, Obsessive/Compulsive Disorder, Oppositional/Defiance disorder, Asperger’s/Non-Verbal Learning, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Dissociative Behaviors – moving from survival to empathy.

Section A: Kim Payne
Time: Saturday & Sunday, February 4 & 5,
9:00 am – 4:30 pm
Maximum: 18
(1 seat reserved for ES student)
Credits: 1


EDP 590
Children with Special Needs: Focus on Childhood

Competency Area: Education & Social Policy
Required of and Restricted to Education Department teacher certification students; others by written permission of program Director attached to or on registration form.
Priority to Waldorf certification students.

This course will examine the assumptions, attitudes and actions of the individual, family, teacher and community toward the special needs child. We will discuss the law and IEP as they relate to special needs students and the public school system, as well as the concepts of mainstreaming, integrated curriculum and teamwork between special educators and the classroom teacher. The focus will be on children with learning disabilities, with secondary emphasis on ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder), emotional and physical disabilities. Students will relate theory to practice through observation and interviews in a variety of special needs settings, as well as through personal reflection and introspection.

Section A: Laureen Harlow
Time: Thursdays, 4:30 – 6:30 pm
Maximum: 18
(1 seat reserved for ES certification student)
Credits: 2


EDC 539
Children’s Games

Competency Area: Curriculum & Instruction

It is necessary for healthy development of the person, yet too often play is considered childish and unimportant. This predominantly experiential course will explore the use of play and games in enriching the education experience. Whether used to develop group cohesiveness or to illustrate concepts or to have fun, a diverse repertoire of games serves the classroom and outdoor educator well. Participants will learn a wide array of traditional games, new games, Project Adventure initiatives, Wide Games and other playgroup pastimes. We will also reflect on game structure and the techniques of leadership.

Section A: David Sobel
Time: Fridays, March 31 – May 12,
1:30 – 3:30 pm
Maximum: 18
(1 seat reserved for ES student)
Credits: 1


EDT 532
Conceptual Development & Learning Theory: Focus on Middle Childhood

Competency Area: Theoretical & Philosophical Foundations of Education
Required of and Restricted to teacher certification students; others by written permission of Program Director attached to or on registration form.
Priority to Education Department students.

How do children think and learn? How do children’s cognitive and affective skills evolve as they develop? How do we teach in conjunction with children’s developmental skills? What assumptions do teachers and curriculum designers make about how children learn? Are these assumptions well founded? How do our personal learning styles differ? How can we construct authentic curriculum that is developmentally appropriate? In attempting to answer these questions, we’ll explore recent research in neurophysiology and learning, language development and learning theory. Laboratory sessions will provide opportunities to synthesize our ideas on thinking, learning and teaching. Throughout, we’ll be attempting to synthesize rational and intuitive modalities in the learning models we develop. Readings include Duckworth, Labinowicz, Vygotsky, Williams, and Britton.

Section A: David Sobel
Section B: Carol Berner
Time: Fridays, 8:30 – 11:00 AM
Maximum: 20 per section
Credits: 3


EDC 561
Creative Bookbinding

Competency Area: Curriculum & Instruction

Student-produced books build pride in the writing process. Making books seems to have widespread appeal for children at various age levels. Whether using simple techniques of fastening a few sheets of paper together or using more involved and elaborate bookbinding procedures, children are often inspired to write something inside their books and are interested in reading other students’ books. In this course, we will explore various methods of making and decorating books with an emphasis on using readily available and inexpensive materials.

Section A: Ron LaBrusciano
Time: Saturday & Sunday, January 21 & 22,
9:00 am – 4:30 pm
Maximum: 20
(1 seat reserved for ES student)
Credits: 1


EDP 629
Critical Skills for Critical Times

Competency Area: Education & Social Policy
(Critical Skills designated course)

Success in school, and the world beyond, depends not only on what students know, but also on what they can do and what they are like. This course focuses on the critical skills and fundamental dispositions (problem-solving, organization, collaboration, self-direction, curiosity and wonder) that form the foundation for both student learning and success outside school. We will determine the skills and dispositions most essential to the dynamic world in which we live, focus on what these capacities look, sound, and feel like in the classroom and how we as teachers can begin to foster these behaviors in the students.

Section A: Maura Hart
Time: Sundays, February 19 & March 5,
9:00 am – 4:30 pm
Maximum: 18
(1 seat reserved for ES student)
Credits: 1


EDC 651
Dancing Classroom:
Dance Education for Grades Pre-K Through 8

Competency Area: Curriculum & Instruction

Learn to lead singing games, social and display dances, and creative movement exploration with children. This course provides theory and practice for integrating dance/movement into the education of children, and curriculum frameworks for a comprehensive program of dance education. No dance experience necessary.

Section A: Kari Smith
Time: Fridays, January 20 – March 10,
1:30 – 3:30 pm
Maximum: 18
(1 seat reserved for ES certification student)
Credits: 1


EDT 609A
Experiential Education: Learning in Meaningful Contexts

Competency Area: Theoretical & Philosophical Foundations of Education (Critical Skills based course)

This course is designed for educators interested in understanding the theory and the practice of experiential education. We will explore what constitutes a learning experience in a variety of educational contexts, such as outdoor education, field trips and service learning. We will identify the ways in which experiences can be more or less educative, looking at a continuum of educational experiences and considering the implications for educational practice. We will also examine the different stages of the experiential learning cycle for use in curriculum design and for practical application.

Section A: Paul Bocko
Time: Saturdays, March 4 & April 1,
8:30 – 4:30
Maximum: 18
(1 seat reserved for ES student)
Credits: 1


ED 691
Internship, Elementary Education
ED 692
Internship, Early Childhood Education
ED 694

Internship, Science/Environmental Education

Internships are available in a variety of public and independent elementary schools and early childhood learning centers. Students are required to do supervised teaching in an approved elementary and/or early childhood setting.
Note: Please be sure to write the correct course number, the number of credits, and the site of your internship in the space provided on your registration form.

Section A: Education Faculty
Credits: variable


ED 697
Professional Practice Seminar

Required of and Restricted to students in Internships. Please write this course on your registration form. Students will be assigned to a section by the Department.

All students in an internship are required to participate in the Professional Seminar. This seminar covers issues arising from working in schools and professional settings, providing a support group for the trials and tribulations of the beginning teacher. Topics covered include discipline, classroom management, designing classroom space, parent-teacher relationships, the politics of public schooling, appropriate physical education programs, uses of educational media and developing a teaching portfolio.

Section A: Ron LaBrusciano
Section B: Judy Coven
Section C: David Sobel
Section D: Arthur Auer
Time: Fridays, 11:30 am – 1:00 pm
Maximum: 10 per section
Credits: credited as part of internship


ED 699
Master’s Project

Required of all Waldorf non-certification students in 5th semester of program.

The Master’s project is a yearlong project of the student’s own choosing. Projects are expected to contribute to the improvement of educational practice, and may have either a research or a developmental focus. Each student or team of students must make a public presentation of the project in a symposium before the end of the program. In the past, symposia have consisted of workshops for other teachers, presentations to school boards or parents, discussions in staff meetings or with seminar participants. Projects may incorporate any variety of media, such as videotapes, slides, pictures, but must also have a written report to accompany them.

Section W: Staff
Credits: 5


ED 699C
Master’s Project Continuation

Students must register for a Master’s Project Continuation every semester until the project has been completed and signed off by your Master’s Project reader. Enrollment in Master’s project Continuation confers half-time status for Financial Aid and loan deferment purposes through May 12, 2006.

Section W: Education Faculty
Credits: Uncredited


EDC 553A
Math Methods: Concrete Approaches to Math Curriculum

Competency Area: Curriculum & Instruction
Required of and Restricted to Education Department teacher certification students; others by written permission of Program Director attached to or on registration form.

This course aims at eliminating math phobia for both children and adults. It is based on the premise that mathematics will be both accessible and enjoyable if understanding is derived from experience and strong links are made between that experience and abstract symbolism. Beginning with a consideration of how children learn mathematics, the course will focus on providing children with opportunities to put together their own mathematical understanding. Students will explore a variety of materials such as base ten blocks, fraction bars, and geoboards. Strategies for encouraging creative problem solving and for meeting the needs of individual students will be examined, as well as assessments and record keeping systems, sources of ideas and materials, and the relevance of the recent standards issued by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

Section A: Judy Coven
Time: Thursdays, 1:00 – 3:30 pm
Maximum: 18
(1 seat reserved for ES student)
Credits: 3


EDC 555
Methods of Teaching Reading & Other Language Arts

Competency Area: Curriculum & Instruction
Required of and Restricted to Education Department teacher certification students; others by written permission of Program Director attached to or on registration form.

Is reading a skill that children naturally develop or is it a process that requires programmatic, constant instruction? Is it better to teach phonics or try a whole language approach? This course will address these questions and consider the following topics:
– an analysis of the reading process and what is involved in decoding and encoding
– different approaches to reading instruction and the use of children’s literature
– ways to teach reading that promote fluency and correctness
– the integration of reading, writing and speech activities throughout the curriculum.

Section A (Focus on K-2): Ron LaBrusciano
Section B (Focus on Grades 3 – 6): Lindy Hanninen
Time: Thursdays, 1:00 – 3:30 pm
Maximum: 18 per section
(1 seat reserved in each section for ES student)
Credits: 3


EDC 665
Movement and Storytelling in the Early Childhood Classroom
(Emphasis on Preschool through Kindergarten)

Competency Area: Curriculum & Instruction
Required of and Priority to Early Childhood Certification Students.
Substitute for Waldorf Curriculum Preparation II.

Movement and stories lay a healthy and joyful foundation for physical, emotional, social, and cognitive development in young children. This course will explore the importance of storytelling and movement in the daily life of children and in the classroom environment. Students will experience a variety of ways to use storytelling, puppetry, singing games, and practical activities to enrich the early childhood classroom.

Section A: Betsi McGuigan
Time: Saturdays, January 28 & March 11,
9:00 am – 4:00 pm
Maximum: 16
Credits: 1


EDC 544B
Painting II

Competency Area: Curriculum & Instruction
Restricted to Waldorf students; others by written permission of Program Director, attached to or on registration form.

Students in this course will develop experience with colors and their relationships to an inner experience that can be objectively observed. The watercolor process, as used in Waldorf schools, provides a key to the artistic process that is an integral and necessary part of human development. Part of a Weekend Retreat combined with EDP 630 Waldorf School Administration and Leadership.

Section A: Karine Munk Finser
Time: Saturday & Monday, January 21 & 23,
12:30 – 5:30 pm, and
Sunday, January 22,
12:30 – 4:30 pm
Snow day: Tuesday, January 24
Maximum: 20
Credits: 1


ED 693
Practicum

The purpose of the Practicum is to assist students in integrating theoretical knowledge gained through reading and seminars with their experience as teachers. The emphasis in the Practicum is upon self-evaluation, reflection, and articulation of experience. Students may call on faculty consultants for particular assistance with classroom practices.

Section W: Education Faculty
Credits: 4


EDP 598
School Law

Competency Area: Education & Social Policy
Required of and Priority to Environmental Studies and Education certification students.

This is a seminar designed to provide knowledge about school law and the prohibition of discrimination on the basis of race, national origin, sex, age or handicapping condition. Through lecture, case discussion, and debate, students will be able to understand the theoretical underpinnings of egalitarian social reform, the differences between public policy, and the principal components and content of relevant policy documents as well as the benefits and limitations of policy in this area.
Text: Edmund Reutter, Jr., The Supreme Court