Clinical Psychology Courses Summer 2005


PY 898
Advanced Practicum

Restricted to Year IV students.

An optional Practicum for Year IV students wishing to have extensive further clinical training for more than 12 hours per week, with a minimum of 300 hours per semester.

Section A: Lorraine Mangione
Credits: 3


PY 710
Biological Foundations of Clinical Psychology
Competency Area: Biological Bases of Behavior
Required of and restricted to Year III students.

The basic goal of this course is to examine the physiological basis of behavior; that is, to approach psychology from a biological perspective. This goal is achieved through examination of the structure and function of the nervous system and related systems; the role of the nervous system and related systems, the role of the nervous system in normal behavior such as eating, sleeping, etc.; and the role of the nervous system in psychopathology and neuropsychological disorders. An emphasis is placed on learning the language of physiological psychology.

Section A: Arthur Maerlender
Time: Mondays, 9:00 am – 1:15 pm
Maximum: 23
Credits: 2


Course Added (04/06/05)
Course Cancelled (05/12/05)

PYS 772
Critical White Studies for Clinical Psychologists

Competency Area: Social Bases of Behavior

The workshop will introduce students to the field of critical white studies. Recent critical scholars across disciplines have turned their attention to whiteness itself, examining whiteness as a cultural concept that our society has created and exposing the systems that teach us how we think about race. The concept of whiteness will be examined in how it is embodied and institutionalized throughout our society, revealing the ways that racism is embedded in relationships, identities, social norms, institutional structures and policies. We will be reading extensively from the text Off White: Readings on Race, Power & Society, edited by Fine, Weis, Powell, and Wong. Class time will be taken up, after a brief introduction, predominantly by discussion drawing upon the text and participant reflections.

Section A: Susan Hawes
Time: Saturday & Sunday, July 16 & 17,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 12
Credits: 1


PYC 705
Dialectical Behavior Therapy

Competency Area: Clinical Techniques & Methods/Interventions
Priority to Year IV students. Up to two Special Students may be accommodated, by written permission of the Director of Student Affairs, if space is available.

After providing an overview of this model, developed by Marsha Linehan for the treatment of disordered behaviors, including the underlying dialectical and behavioral principles, this course focuses on the following DBT treatment strategies: dialectical, validation, problem-solving, managing contingencies, observing limits, skills training, exposure, cognitive modification, stylistic, case management, structural, crisis and suicidal behavior treatment strategies. The outcome research on this empirically-supported treatment is evaluated. Lecture, discussion, role-plays, videotape, mindfulness exercises, and small group tasks are utilized to facilitate the learning of the DBT model.

Section A: David Arbeitman
Time: Saturday & Sunday,
June 11 & 12
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Changed 05/12/05 to:
Time: Saturday & Sunday, June 25 & 26, 9:00 – 5:00 pm

Maximum: 25
Credits: 1


PY 899
Doctoral Dissertation

Year V+ students who have already completed 2,000 hours of internship, need register for only PY 899, Doctoral Dissertation. Students must register for doctoral dissertation each semester until dissertation has been deposited.

Section A: George Tremblay
Credits: uncredited


PY 702
Historical & Social Context of Psychology

Competency Area: History & Systems of Psychology
Required of and restricted to Year IV students.

This course examines the historical and philosophical context of psychology. While attention is paid to some of the more ancient philosophical themes anticipating psychology, the focus is predominantly on a critique of modern scientific and applied psychology to expose its social-relational aspects. Current poststructuralist, social constructionist and historical critiques are integrated with voices from the history of science and modern philosophy in order to improve our understanding of where psychology is today.

Section A: Susan Hawes
Time: Mondays, 2:30 – 6:45 pm
Maximum: 23
Credits: 2


PY 896 (Year IV students)
PY 897 (Year V+ students)
Internship

Restricted to Year IV & V+ students.

Prior to graduation, each student must successfully complete an approved internship of 2,000 hours within 24 calendar months, which meets the guidelines published by the Council for the National Register of Health Service Providers in Psychology. Internship may be pursued in several formats: half-time during the fourth and fifth years, full-time during the fifth year, etc. Year IV students should register for PY 896, Internship and Year V+ students should register for PY 897, Internship.

Section A: Colborn Smith
Credits: uncredited


PY 893B (Year III students)
PY 894A (Year IV students)
Practicum

Restricted to Year III & IV students.

This practicum is for students required to extend their practicum through the summer and who are doing well beyond the required 600 hours. Credit can be used in lieu of a workshop credit only. This is not a required practicum.

Section A: Lorraine Mangione
Credits: 1


PY 772
Psychology in the Community

Competency Area: Social Bases of Behavior
Required of and restricted to Year III students.

This course examines psychology in the community context, with special attention to community psychology, prevention, and psychological services delivery systems. Central topics include primary and secondary prevention, the community mental health center movement; the role of psychologists outside the consulting room; issues in service delivery and managed care; and the political and regulatory aspects of psychology.

Section A: Fern Chertok
Time: Mondays, 2:30 – 6:45 pm
Maximum: 23
Credits: 2


PYC 702
Psychotherapeutic Intervention III: Group

Competency Area: Clinical Techniques & Methods/Interventions
Required of and restricted to Year II students.

This is a continuation of the fall and spring semester courses, with the emphasis on group. This course provides an introduction to current, clinically relevant knowledge and theory about behavior in groups and about the dilemmas of group life. It also provides an in-depth look at the various types of group activities commonly conducted by professional psychologists. Specific topics to be addressed include the individual in the group; issues of group development; transference issues in groups; functional roles of group members; and unconscious dynamics in group life. The aim is to provide didactic and experiential learning opportunities which enhance the ability of students to test theory against the realities of group life as they experience them.

Section A: Mark Lange
Section B: Lorraine Mangione
Section C: David Junno
(Section assignments will be made by the department.)
Time: Mondays, 9:00 am – 1:15 pm
Maximum: 15 per section
Credits: 2


PYC 708
Psychotherapeutic Intervention IV:
Special Topics in Intervention

Competency Area: Clinical Techniques & Methods/ Interventions
Required of and Restricted to Year IV students.

This course is designed to address a variety of special topics related to clinical intervention. Work with specific populations; problems; intervention strategies; issues; or in specific settings may be covered. Possible topics include: severe mental illness; substance abuse; personality disorders; dual diagnosis; geriatrics; treatment of children and adolescents; disaster response; etc.

Section A: David Arbeitman
Time: Mondays, 9:00-1:15pm
Maximum: 23
Credits: 2


PYC 707
Psychotherapy with Lesbians, Gay Men & Bisexuals

Competency Area: Clinical Techniques & Methods/Interventions
Priority to Year III and IV students.

This course focuses on clinical and community-based interventions with lesbians, gay men, and bisexuals (LGBs). It examines the social constructs of homosexuality and sexual prejudice and how these constructs influence the lives and therapies of persons who identify as LGB individuals. Among the topics covered are: the social context for LGB people, internalized oppression, APA’s guidelines for psychotherapy with LGB clients, and community-based interventions designed to promote psychosocial resilience among LGB people.

Section A: Neal King
Time: Saturday & Sunday,
June 18 & 19
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 15
Credits: 1


PY 786
Social Psychology and Social Responsibility

Competency Area: Social Bases of Behavior
Required of and Restricted to Year II students.

This course applies the perspective of social psychological theory to the definition and structure of mental health services. Among the issues that will be considered are patterns of violence in our culture, boundaries between legal and mental health systems, stigma and related problems, differing demands of rural versus urban cultures, and society’s role in defining serious mental illness.

Section A: Jim Fauth
Time: Mondays, 2:30 – 6:45 pm
Maximum: 27
Credits: 2


PY 894C
Special Proficiency Practicum

Restricted to Year III & IV students.

This is a Practicum for Year III or IV students wishing to have further clinical training experience with a specific focus for a minimum of 80 hours per semester (Summer) or 100 hours per semester (Fall and Spring)

Section A: Lorraine Mangione
Credits: 1


PY 890
SIS: Supervised Individual Study

If you are planning an independent study, please register for an SIS on your registration form. However, an SIS contract must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office by July 10, 2005 in order for it to appear on your schedule or transcript. Please be sure to specify on the contract if the SIS will be used to fulfill a competency area or serve as a required course substitute, or as an elective. Contracts received after the July 10th deadline will be returned to you for registration in a subsequent semester (additional costs may apply). Credits will not appear on your schedule until the SIS contract(s) has been submitted to the Registrar’s Office, thus affecting your enrollment status and perhaps your financial aid eligibility.

Credits: variable


Course Added (04/06/05)

PYC 728
Narrative Therapy

Competency Area: Clinical Techniques & Methods/Interventions
Restricted to Year III & IV students.
Priority to Year III students.

This workshop will provide an overview of narrative therapy theory and practices. It will examine how clinicians can use a narrative metaphor and view problems as separate from people and as situated in larger sociopolitical contexts. Numerous clinical practices will be presented, such as the attitudinal stance of the therapist, the use of questions, externalizing practices, the role of teams both physical and virtual, and the use of client documentation

Section A: Bill Lax
Time: Saturday & Sunday, June 25 & 26,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 20
Credits: 1


PY 863
Writing Workshop

Competency Area: Elective
Restricted to students who are referred by faculty members and/or the director of the writing program.
Prerequisite: Students must submit a writing sample.

This course focuses on developing technical writing skills appropriate for doctoral level psychologists. The content will emphasize APA writing standards for professional reports, papers, dissertations, and general publications. One component of the course will involve hands-on writing exercises. Readings will focus on mastering APA writing style. This course can be repeated for credit.

Section A: Greg Blair
Time: Saturday & Sunday,
July 9 & 10
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 8
Credits: 1


Class Added:

PY 868
Writing Workshop II

Competency Area: Elective
Prerequisite: Completion of Writing Workshop

This course will start where the first Writing Workshop left off. The student shall have the opportunity to learn more detailed information in each of the areas covered by the first Workshop, as well as be introduced to basic concepts of critical analysis. Course content will include a quick review of basic writing components (grammar, punctuation, structure, outlining, and APA style) covered in the first course. The instructor will then provide new information and concepts about each component, as well as an introduction to critical analysis (inductive and deductive reasoning, ambiguity and vagueness, testing the validity of an argument, etc.). In addition, the student will learn how to conceptualize, organize, and write his or her dissertation.

Section A: Greg Blair
Time: Saturday & Sunday, June 18 & 19
Saturday: 8:30 am – 6:00 pm
Sunday: 8:30 am – 3:00 pm
Maximum: 8
Credits: 1