Clinical Psychology Courses Spring 2005


PY 898
Advanced Practicum

An optional Practicum for fourth year students wishing to have extensive further clinical training for more than 12 hours per week, with a minimum of 300 hours per semester.

Section A: Lorraine Mangione
Credits: 3


PY 856A
Advanced Seminar:
Aftermath & Treatment of Trauma

Competency Area: Clinical Techniques and Methods/Interventions
Restricted to Year III & Year IV students.
Priority to Year IV students.

The psychological sequelae of traumatic events and their resolution will be the focus of this course. This will be illustrated using a four-stage model: victimization, aftermath, integration, and full recovery. Specific trauma-related disorders will be covered, including simple and complex PTSD. The trauma literature will be examined through a psychohistorical lens.

Section A: Margaret Goodwin
Time: Mondays,
4:30 – 7:00 pm
Maximum: 12
Credits: 3


PYC 717
Advanced Seminar:
Assessment and Treatment of Couples

Competency Area: Clinical Techniques and Methods/Interventions
Restricted to Year IV students.

This course surveys the predominant approaches to couple/marital therapy as well as the body of empirical findings on successful relationships that have implications for treatment. Modifications of couple therapy to address specific problems such as depression, alcoholism, and sexual dysfunction will be considered. In addition, special issues relevant to couple therapy, including assessment, parenting, infidelity and forgiveness, separation/divorce, domestic violence, and working with diversity will be covered.

Section A: David Arbeitman
Time: Mondays,
9:00 -11:00 am
Maximum: 12
Credits: 3


PY 820A
Advanced Seminar:
Brief Psychotherapy

Competency Area: Clinical Techniques and Methods/Interventions
Restricted to Year III & Year IV students.
Priority to Year IV students.

Pragmatic and humanitarian rationales for brief treatment are provided by reviews of psychotherapy utilization, outcome, and process research as well as consideration of its relationship to national health care. Approaches derived from a variety of theoretical orientations are surveyed. The elements common to these are identified and presented as a transtheoretical approach to therapy which can be used from all orientations. Cases are used to illustrate strategy and techniques.

Section A: Jim Fauth
Time: Mondays, 4:30 – 7:00 pm
Maximum: 12
Credits: 3


PYB 711
Advanced Seminar:
Clinical Neuropsychology

Competency Area: Biological Bases of Behavior
Restricted to Year III & Year IV students.
Priority to Year IV students.
Prerequisite: Methods of Psychological Assessment I and II
Up to two Special Students may be accommodated, by written permission of the Director of Student Affairs, if space is available.

This seminar examines the structure and function of the central nervous system, brain-behavior relationships, and neuropathology. Seminar content focuses on evaluation techniques for diagnosis of brain dysfunction including visual, auditory, memory, and language processes. Application of these techniques to the development of remedial strategies for learning disabilities and adult dysfunctions is addressed.

Section A: Richard Toye
Time: Mondays, 4:30 – 7:00 pm
Maximum: 12
Credits: 3


PYI 705
Advanced Seminar: Forensic Psychology

Competency Area: Effective Interventions
Restricted to Year IV students.

This seminar focuses on the practice of forensic psychology with an emphasis on the context for a relationship between the law and behavioral sciences. Following a general overview of the legal and court systems, including the history and role of mental health experts in the judiciary, this seminar focuses on six primary ways that clinical psychologists provide services to legal professionals: competency in the clinical process, mental status at the time of the offense, sentencing and rehabilitation, civil commitment and civil competencies, compensation for mental or emotional injuries, children and families, and juvenile justice. With each of these venues, students learn how to appreciate the relevant legal issues and to better communicate important psychological findings to courts and legal professionals.

Section A: William Halikias
Time: Mondays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 12
Credits: 3


PY 719
Advanced Seminar: Health Psychology

Competency Area: Biological Bases of Behavior
Restricted to Year III & Year IV students.
Priority to Year IV students.
Up to two Special Students may be accommodated, by written permission of the Director of Student Affairs, if space is available.

This course provides an overview of the emerging field of clinical health psychology and behavioral medicine. There will be a focus on the delivery of clinical services in an interdisciplinary healthcare setting, with an emphasis on the role of the psychologist as consultant to a variety of medical subspecialties. Topics to be reviewed include the psychophysiology of stress, the stress-illness connection, psychoneuroimmunology, the psychology of pain, treatment adherence, and psychosocial variables in chronic health conditions. In addition, the factors mediating the health-illness continuum will be examined, with particular emphasis on the psychology of wellness. Students are introduced to various tools of the trade, including biofeedback, relaxation training, meditation, clinical hypnosis, and psychophysiological psychotherapy.

Section A: Victor Pantesco
Time: Mondays, 4:30 – 7:00 pm
Maximum: 12
Credits: 3


PY 816F
Advanced Seminar:
Psychological Assessment:
Evaluations For Clinics, Schools, and Courts

Competency Area: Clinical Techniques and Methods/Interventions
Restricted to Year III & Year IV students who have completed Methods of Psychological Assessment I and II and have at least one year psychological assessment experience. Basic familiarity with the Wechsler scales and the Rorschach test (Comprehensive System) is MANDATORY.
Priority to Year IV students.
Up to two Special Students may be accommodated, by written permission of the Director of Student Affairs, if space is available.

This course explores the meaning of clinical inference as it relates to the assessment enterprise. Psychological assessment is the development of diagnostic meaning from a person