Applied Psychology Courses Spring 2005


PYB 518
Body-Mind Centering Approaches to Developmental Movement
Competency Area: Behavioral Science Foundation
Priority to DMT students.

This course will explore the developmental principles of Body-Mind Centering as identified and described by Bonnie Bainbridge Cohen. Our earliest body experiences, how we move, how we are touched and carried, influence our subsequent physical, perceptual and psychological organization. The developmental movement patterns and themes which unfold during the first year of life provide the foundation for our relationships with self, other, and the environment. By examining and experiencing these patterns and related body systems we will gain insight into our own psycho-physical organization as well as gain a better understanding of the body-mind connection.

Section A: Amelia Ender
Time: Saturday & Sunday, March 12 & 13,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 24
Credits: 1


PYC 652
Career/Lifestyle Development

Restricted to Applied Psychology students: others by written permission of Program Director attached to or on registration form.
Section A & B: Priority to Fall 2004 CP/SA/AC entrants, 6 spaces each section reserved for DMT II students.
Prerequisites: PY 590A, Fundamentals of Therapeutic Interaction and PYB 505, Human Development and Diversity, or equivalent

This course will provide both the theoretical foundation and practical experience necessary to understand and foster career/life development in individual and group counseling settings. Topics include career and developmental theories; the elements and evaluation of life careers; administration and interpretation of career-related assessment instruments; and definition of the role, ethics and professional identity within the field of career development.

Section A: Carlotta Willis
Section B: Meg Connor
Time: Wednesdays, 1:00 – 3:30 pm
Maximum: 22 per section
Credits: 3


PYI 522
Counseling Skills Lab
Competency Areas: Individual Assessment & Intervention Strategies
Prerequisite: PY 590A, Fundamentals of Therapeutic Interaction

This course will focus on further enhancement of the technical and conceptual skills of counseling. The course will consist of reflection on the development of the self-in-role and continued application of theory to practice through in-class skills exercises and supervision.

Section A: Meg Connor
Changed 01/31/05 to: Ann McCloskey
Section B: Thomas Barker
Section C: Alice Scudder
Time: Wednesdays, 4:00 – 5:30 pm
Maximum: 12 per section
Credits: 1


PYI 512
Counseling Theories: Models and Approaches

(formerly Theories of Personality & Individual Counseling)
Competency Area: Individual Assessment & Intervention Strategies
Required of and Restricted to CP I, SA/AC I and DMT I students; others by written permission of the Program Director attached to or on registration form.
Prerequisites: PY 590A, Fundamentals of Therapeutic Interaction and PYB 505, Human Development & Diversity

The course provides an understanding of the major counseling theories and their application with clients, and their family/cultural/systems contexts. An overview of the evolution and development of the core tenets of counseling and psychotherapy will provide a context for a more extensive examination of the current approaches utilized by mental health counselors in practice settings. These approaches include psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral, interpersonal, and solution-focused models. The course will focus on the theories and practices through didactic presentations, demonstrations and experiential work with the goal of giving class members the tools to function effectively in practica and internships.

Section A: Betsy Taylor
Section B: Barbara Andrews
Section C: Ken Bacon
Time: Tuesdays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 18 per section
Credits: 3


PYC 675
Crisis Intervention: Cognitive Behavioral Approaches

Restricted to CP II students; others by written permission of Program Director attached to or on registration form.
Prerequisite: Completion of all CP I courses and internships

This course will provide an overview to the theory and practice of crisis intervention from a cognitive-behavioral perspective. The variety of crisis situations and the phenomenon of suicide will be examined as well as the roles and responsibilities of counselors in making the interventions. Students will be exposed to a variety of models of counseling under the heading of cognitive-behavioral with the objective of helping the student develop an integrated approach to the range of problems clients present. Members will have the opportunity to present case material to the class.

Section A: Ken Bacon
Time: Tuesdays, 4:00 – 6:30 pm
Maximum: 15
Credits: 3


PY 618A
Dance/Movement Therapy with Adults

Competency Area: Individual Assessment & Intervention Strategies
Required of and Priority to DMT II students. Open to CP II & SA/AC II students as a PYC equivalent; others by written permission of Program Director attached to or on registration form.

This course will present a theoretical and practical framework for in-depth work and brief treatment models in dance/movement therapy with a variety of adult populations. Trauma and addictions recovery models, along with mind-body and object relations frameworks are examined and integrated with KMP, Laban and Body-Mind CenteringTM concepts. Techniques such as somatic countertransference, gestalt work, integrated transformational healing, dramatic improvisational experiments, rechoreography of object relations and authentic movement are explored and experienced.

Section A: Kim Burden
Time: Tuesdays, 4:00 – 6:30 pm
Maximum: 20
Credits: 3


PYC 666
Family Therapy Approaches To Addictions Treatment

Required of and Restricted to SA/AC II students; others by written permission of Program Director attached to or on registration form.
Prerequisite: PYC 626, completion of all CP/SA/AC I courses and internships

This course will provide an understanding of the structure and dynamics of marriage and other committed relationships, and families, and look at a variety of systemic interventions including structural, strategic, and Bowenian approaches. Special attention will be given to understanding of and intervention with shame-based family systems including families with addictions, domestic violence and other family problems which require broad-based as well as dynamic interventions.

Section A: Diane Kurinsky
Time: Tuesdays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 15
Credits: 3


PYC 668
Family Therapy Approaches to Counseling Adolescents

(formerly Adolescent & Family Counseling)
Restricted to CP II students: others by written permission of Program Director attached to or on registration form.
Prerequisite: Completion of all CP I courses and internships

This course is designed to introduce the student to the theory and practice of marriage/relationship/family counseling with an emphasis on families in which the adolescent is the identified client. Marriage/relationship/family therapy approaches and effective models of adolescent treatment within this context will be addressed, integrating models of working with larger systems, such as schools and social services. Topics include systemic assessment and family interventions strategies for adolescent eating disorders, substance abuse, depression, PTSD, and risk-taking behaviors.

Section A: Larry Ruhf
Time: Tuesdays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 15
Credits: 3


PY 590A
Fundamentals of Therapeutic Interaction

Competency Area: Individual Assessment & Intervention Strategies
Required of and Priority to Spring 2005 entering CP, SA/AC students.

This course is designed to help the beginning mental health professional acquire fundamental counseling skills. Theoretical approaches, including cognitive, behavioral, systemic, humanistic, relational, and psychodynamic, will be introduced. Topics include counselor roles and ethics, the dimensions of contemporary mental health practice, and the multicultural counseling perspective. Students will also explore the particular interpersonal dynamics of helping relationships and develop self-in-role awareness. The course balances theory and practical learning through in-class counseling practice.

Section A: Laura Copland
Section B: Ann McCloskey
Changed 01/31/05 to: Meg Connor
Time: Wednesdays, 4:00 – 6:30 pm
Maximum: 15 per section
Credits: 3


PYG 604
Group Dance/Movement Therapy

Competency Area: Group Assessment & Intervention Strategies
Required of and Restricted to DMT I students; others by written permission of Program Director attached to or on registration form.

This course will explore methods in group Dance/Movement Therapy (DMT) useful in the treatment of clients in a variety of clinical settings. Special attention will be given to providing a theoretical and experiential understanding of group purpose, development and dynamics. The Chace approach will be utilized to teach basic DMT group skills; other leadership styles and techniques will be examined to prepare the student for DMT internship experiences with a wide variety of populations. The instructor will present theoretical material and facilitate experiential learning through lecture, discussion, video, group processing, and reflection papers. Students will have the opportunity to develop their own style and expertise by designing and implementing role-played DMT groups appropriate to the population of their choice.

Section A: Phyllis Jeswald
Time: Wednesdays, 1:00 – 3:30 pm
Maximum: 20
Credits: 3


PYB 505
Human Development and Diversity

Competency Area: Behavioral Science Foundation
Required of and Priority to Spring 2005 entering CP, SA/AC students.

This course will provide an overview of human development throughout the lifetime in the family, social and cultural context. The individual and family life cycles will be viewed as mutually interactive processes which are also affected by such factors as biology/genetics, gender, race, ethnicity, acculturation, religion, etc. The development of the individual will be traced chronologically through a survey of a select number of major theoretical approaches. The family and other factors influencing and generated by the individual