Environmental Studies Courses Fall 2005

Master’s Programs
Doctoral Program (Ph.D)


Master’s Programs


ES 520
Advanced Statistics

Competency Area: EAO, CB, EE, Cert, IND, RMA – Elective

Priority to Conservation Biology students.
Prerequisite: Ecological Research Design or, by instructor’s written consent, strong background in basic statistics.

Some branches of conservation biology and ecology have become increasingly quantitative in their focus. This class builds on the basic statistical procedures covered in Ecological Research Design. Topics will include logistic regression, cluster analysis, principal components analysis, stepwise and multiple regression, MANOVA, analysis of covariance, nested ANOVA, discriminate function analysis, concordance analysis, and other selected procedures to be determined by student interest. Each type of analysis will be examined and discussed with examples from the primary literature, and assignments will give students hands-on practice in performing these procedures. Class will emphasize when particular approaches are appropriate, and how they are implemented via JMP or PC-ORD software packages.

Section A: Jon Atwood
Time: Thursdays, 8:00 – 11:00 am
Maximum: 16
Credits 3


ES 518
Advocacy Clinic I

Competency Area: EAO – Required
Required of and restricted to EAO students.

Do you want to take sustained, effective action on an issue you care about with other Antioch students? Are you looking for an opportunity to develop and hone your advocacy skills? How about working on an actual campaign? This course offers participants the opportunity to engage in supervised practical advocacy work on behalf of clinic “clients” — organizations at the local, state, national or international level working for environmental protection, corporate accountability, and social justice. Working in small group teams, students will design, conduct and evaluate advocacy projects for actual organizations under the supervision of the instructor. The goal of the course is to provide students with a strong supervised experiential learning opportunity in the field with more group support, attention to theory, and supervision than an individual practicum placement usually allows. Course elements include campaign and project planning & management, research & lobbying skills, effective communication (e.g., media releases, briefing papers), and project evaluation. The course will combine theory with practical supervised experience and direct interaction with on-the-ground advocates.

Section A: Abigail Abrash-Walton
Times: Thursdays, 1:00 – 4:00 pm
Maximum 10
Credits: 3


ESF 558

Bird Migration
Competency Area: Natural Communities elective
Priority to Fall 04 ES entrants.

This course introduces the phenomenon of bird migration – one of the great annual spectacles of the natural world. Two 2-day field trips will provide opportunities to observe migrating waterfowl, shorebirds, hawks and songbirds en route between their northern breeding grounds and wintering areas in the southeastern US, the Caribbean, and Central and South America. During class meetings on September 15 and October 6 we will discuss theories about the evolution of migratory behavior, navigation and orientation, and physiology, as well as look at specific examples of how these international travelers serve as focal points for many conservation initiatives. Food and camping fees are not included.

Section A: Jon Atwood
Time: Pre-trip meeting dates Thursdays, 7:00 _ 9:00 pm September 15 and October 6;
field classes, Saturdays and Sundays,

6:00 am – 4:00pm
September 17 & 18 and October 8 & 9
Maximum: 16
Credits: 2


ESAM 516

Building Sustainable Organizations

Competency Areas: RMA – Required alternate to 4 Perspectives of Management; IND – Strongly Recommended; CB, EAO, EE & Cert – Elective
Priority to RMA & IND students.

BSO surveys the landscape of sustainability theory and literature by considering organizational purpose, design and behavior through the lenses of ecology, management, economics and social justice. This course prepares students to analyze organizations from the perspective of sustainable practices, and to develop an understanding of the importance of self-knowledge and personal sustainability. BSO is designed to serve as a gateway for further study. The course relies on heavily active participation by all class members, drawing from each participant’s previous organizational and managerial experiences.

Section A: Pete Throop
Time: Thursdays, 1:00 – 4:00 pm
Maximum: 16

Credits: 3


ESF 539A
Coastal Geoecology

Competency Area: Natural Communities elective
Priority to Fall 04 ES entrants.

Please Note: Attendance at ALL pre-trip meetings is mandatory. Enrolled students who fail to drop the course 1 week before the first pre-trip meeting or who fail to attend the first pre-trip meeting will be held financially responsible for the cost of the trip and will forfeit their seat in the class. Students on the waitlist are strongly encouraged to attend the first class.

On this 5-day trip, we will examine the geoecology of glaciated coasts in New England using Cape Cod as a model system. Course topics will include landscape to local-scale depositional and erosional processes as influenced by coastal climate and disturbance; barrier island dynamics and the ecological role of estuaries; geological and climatic controls on coastal evolution; vascular plant succession and soil ecological processes on active dune systems; impacts of coastal development and other human impacts on physical and ecological processes; and management issues in New England coastal systems. Cost: approximately $300.00.

Section A: Rachel Thiet and Jim Jordan
Times: Pre-trip meeting: Thursday September 8,
5:00 – 8:00 pm and
Saturday – Wednesday, September 24 – 28, Study Trip.
Location: Antioch and Cape Cod, Massachusetts

Maximum: 12
Credits: 2


ESF 550
Community Ecology of the New England Landscape

Competency Area: Natural Communities – Required
Required of and Priority to ES students entering in Fall 05.
Prerequisite: Being able to identify by bark the two dozen most common species of central New England trees (study guide available through Antioch’s web site).

This course examines the diversity of plant communities found in central New England with special attention to the impact of topography, substrate, and disturbance regimes on community composition and structure. As a largely field-based course, both qualitative and quantitative means will be used to describe community composition and structure, as well as the reasons for community placement. Ecocindicator species will be used to delineate specific topographic and edaphic sites, while evidence of various disturbances will be used to interpret successional patterns as a means for “reading the landscape.” The course will have a strong grounding in concepts related to community ecology including dominance, diversity, niche structuring, and succession. Skills in plant community sampling, soil interpretation. and plant identification will also be developed. A number of outstanding representatives of community types in the central Connecticut River watershed will be visited.

Sections A, B & D: Tom Wessels
Sections C & E: Marc Lapin
Time: Section A: Wednesdays,
9:00 am – 12:00 pm

(Priority to Env Ed students who take ESE 502,
Foundations of Env Ed Section A)
Section B: Wednesdays, 1:00 – 4:00 pm
Section B changed 10/18/05 to: Wednesdays, 1:00 – 4:30 pm
Section C: Fridays, 8:00 – 11:00 am
Sections D & E: Fridays, 1:00 – 4:00 pm
(Priority to RMA)
Maximum: 17 per section
Credits: 3


ESE 535
Conceptual and Human Development

Competency Areas: Cert – Required: EE – Required alternate; EAO, CB, IND & RMA – Elective
Required of and Priority to Fall 04 ES Certification entrants.

An understanding of human development is the foundation for good teaching. Developmental processes, the intersection of biology and cultural context, are the blueprint upon which the educational objectives and curricula of schools should be built. We will explore the entire life span, focusing on cognitive development throughout, with primary emphasis on middle childhood and adolescence. In an attempt to better understand thinking and learning, we will explore a variety of questions including: What is thinking? How does it develop? What is intelligence? and, Are learning and intelligence related? This course will provide an overview of the potential conceptual abilities of children and adults and a framework for creating effective curricula.

Section A: Sue Gentile
Time: Fridays, 1:00 – 4:00 pm
Maximum: 16
(1 seat reserved for Education student)
Credits: 3


ESS 563
Conservation Biology
Competency Area: CB – Required; EAO, EE, Cert, IND & RMA – Elective

Required of and Priority to Conservation Biology students.

This course examines the biology underlying our attempts to conserve diversity at the level of genes, species, communities, and ecosystems. We will learn about the major issues and problems in conservation biology, and the tools biologists use to accomplish their conservation goals. We will apply qualitative and quantitative tools from population biology, and community and landscape ecology to learn how we can predict the vulnerability of populations and species to extinction. Example case studies and current events will allow us to explore issues such as reserve design and management, policy issues, reintroduction projects, and restoration efforts. Students will delve into the most recent conservation biology literature to become familiar with predominant debates and contentious issues in the field. The course is designed to help students develop a critical perspective, pertinent quantitative tools, and a vision of where the field of conservation biology came from and where it is headed.

Sections A & B: Beth Kaplin

Time: Section A: Thursdays, 1:00 – 4:00 pm
Section B: Thursdays, 4:30 – 7:30 pm
Maximum: 12 per section
Credits: 3


ESF 546
Conservation Challenges: Impending Changes in the Northern Forest

Competency Area: Natural Communities elective

Priority to Fall 04 ES entrants.

Please Note: Attendance at ALL pre-trip meetings is mandatory. Enrolled students who fail to drop the course at least 1 week before the first pre-trip meeting or who fail to attend the first pre-trip meeting will be held financially responsible for the cost of the trip and will forfeit their seat in the class. Students on the waitlist are strongly encouraged to attend the first class.

Changing economies and the desire for increasing access represent major conservation challenges throughout the forest lands in northern New England. Natural habitats are being significantly disturbed through changes in ownership patterns, intensive liquidation harvesting practices and growing development pressures, leading to fragmentation of forest communities, and issues associated with edge effects and loss of connectivity. Elevated human population density in southern New England regions increases recreational demands on natural areas in northern regions, potentially threatening their long-term biological viability. The mixture of habitat protection and species conservation options has become more complex as the owners of vast forest holdings seek to divest. This 5-day field study trip to northern Vermont will address elements of ecology, land-use planning, socioeconomic pressures, governmental regulatory processes, and land protection initiatives. Field activities will focus on the ecology of Northern Forest communities, and meetings with regional experts as a means of exploring the “nuts-and-bolts” of ongoing conservation and planning efforts. Topic areas to be explored will draw from individual student interests and will include the role of umbrella species in conservation planning, planning processes for updating the Green Mountain National Forest Plan, the impacts of changing ownership patterns on forest use, and the complex negotiations resulting on the protection of the Champion International Lands. Cost approximately $250.

Section A: Pete Throop
Time: Thursdays, 6:30 – 9:00 pm,
August 25 – pre-trip meeting and

September 29 – post-trip meeting
and Saturday – Wednesday,
September 10 – 14 (Study trip)
Maximum: 12
Credits: 2


ESE 514

Curriculum Design: Non-Formal
Competency Areas: EE – Required; Cert, EAO, CB, IND & RMA – Elective
Required of and Priority to Fall 04 ES Environmental Education entrants.

Designing curriculum is an extremely creative process, filled with controversies and dilemmas. It is a political, philosophical, and theoretical process. In this class, we will analyze, critique, and redesign both the explicit and hidden curriculum of a variety of materials as we attempt to resolve our conflicting conceptions of curriculum and develop our own philosophy of curriculum design. Consider this course as a way to help you move further along with your own questions and concerns about curriculum design and as an opportunity to twist, stretch, and flip your current understanding of what it means to design curriculum.

Sections A: Sue Gentile
Section B: Cindy Thomashow

Time: Section A: Fridays, 8:00 – 11:00 am
Section B: Fridays, 1:00 – 4:00 pm
Maximum: 14 per section
Credits: 3


ESXO 503
Dispute Resolution

Competency Areas: RMA – Required alternate; IND – Strongly Recommended; EAO, EE, CB & Cert – Elective

Priority to Fall 04 RMA entrants.

Each of us has negotiated for something. Some of us thrive on it; others shrink from the mere prospect. This course is designed to give participants the skills to be able to approach dispute resolution with confidence. We will examine some of the underlying theory regarding alternative dispute resolution. Most of our in-class time, however, will be spent actually negotiating. Through the use of case studies (the majority of which are environmental in nature) we will inhabit particular roles and endeavor to find a mutually agreeable resolution of the dispute.

Note: All students are required to read Getting to Yes by Fisher, Ury and Patton and Difficult Conversations by Stone, Patton & Heen prior to the first class meeting. There is also a $32 materials fee that will be collected by the instructor.

Section A: Rebecca Todd
Time: Thursdays, September 1 – October 20,

1:00 – 4:00 pm
and Saturday, TBA,
9:00 am – 4:30 pm
Changed 08/10/05 to: Saturday, October 8, 8:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 12
Credits: 2c


ES 517
Diversity and Coalition-Building for Environmentalists

Competency Areas: EAO – Required; CB, EE, Cert, IND & RMA – Elective
Required of and Priority to Environmental Advocacy and Organizing students.

Historically, social movements have been strongest when they involve large numbers of people who unite across social barriers such as race, class, and gender for a common purpose. Social movements are weakest, however, when the prejudices and power relationships of the larger society remain unchallenged within their own organizations. This situation often leaves environmental movements vulnerable to “divide and conquer” strategies by power-holders and reduces the creativity and effectiveness of environmental organizations by marginalizing the voices, insights, and potential contributions of women, people of color, working-class activists, or ethnic and religious minorities. Now, more than ever, building an environmental movement based on solid working relationships, a spirit of trust, shared interest, and solidarity across the social boundaries of race, gender, class, geography, and culture is a prerequisite for lasting, democratic transformation. This class will focus on both theory and practice with a particular emphasis on: 1) understanding the dynamics of social oppression; 2) building effective relationships across difference; and 3) addressing power dynamics as well as the other challenges in creating diverse organizations and effective coalitions.

Section A: Dan Nicolai

Time: Thursdays, September 1 – 29; October 6, 13 & 27, November 3; and December 1 – 15
4:30 – 7:30 pm and
Saturday & Sunday, October 22 & 23,
9:00 am – 4:30 pm
Maximum: 14
Credits: 3


ESS 572
Earth Systems Science: Planetary Dynamics

Competency Areas: Biosphere Science – Required
Required of and Priority to ES students entering in Fall 05 (see specifics below).

This course employs a systems approach to understanding earth’s physical and biological environment, by examining the critical components and processes of the earth system. Understanding the interaction of these elements and their natural variability in space and time is critical for assessing the rates, modes, and consequences of environmental change. Emphasis will be placed on the role of humans as agents of change at local, regional, and planetary scales.

Sections A & B (Kaste) will emphasize the intimate linkages between our atmosphere, biosphere, lithosphere and hydrosphere. We will study the processes by which earth’s materials are constantly transferred between these living and nonliving reservoirs, and how these natural cycles have been profoundly influenced by human activities.

Sections C & E (Thiet) will emphasize earth systems processes on a global scale and their synthesis in light of contemporary global change issues, particularly as changes in global biogeochemistry and land use patterns impact biological systems.

Sections D & F (Jordan) will emphasize the manifestation of global-scale earth system processes in New England. Climate change dynamics will form a central theme, with particular emphasis on the Holocene and historic time periods.

Sections A & B: Jim Kaste

Sections C & E: Rachel Thiet
Sections D & F: Jim Jordan
Time: Section A: Thursdays 1:00 – 4:00 pm
(Priority to Env Ed students who take

ESE 502 Foundations of Env Ed Section A and CB students who take ESS 563 Con Bio section B)
Section B: Thursdays 5:00 – 8:00 pm
(Priority to RMA and CB students who take ESS 563 Con Bio section A)

Sections C & D: Fridays, 8:00 – 11:00 am
Sections E & F Fridays, 1:00 – 4:00 pm
Maximum: 14 per section
Credits: 3


ESP 601

Ecological Economics and Public Policy
Competency Areas: Civic Ecology
(formerly Environmental Issues)
Priority to ES students entering in Fall 05.

The premise of this course is that human actions are embedded within the natural environment. The political and economic systems that have been developed to meet the needs of a society are framed by the limitations of that environment. This course will allow students to explore how these societal institutions function to deal with questions as freedom of choice, scarcity, ownership, equity, sustainability and change.

The course will investigate the development of environmental policies as informed by science, economics, public opinion and legal precedent. Students will be introduced to the policy tools utilized to translate policy into implementation and how effective such approaches have been in meeting overall environmental policy objectives. The primary focus will be within the United States, but innovative approaches that have been developed and utilized in other countries will also be presented to the students.

Section A: Jim Gruber
Section B: Michael Simpson
Time: Section A: Thursdays, 8:30 – 11:00 am
Time: Section B: Fridays, September 2 – December 2, 8:30 – 11:00 am and
Sunday, November 13,
9:00 am – 4:30 pm.
(Priority to RMA)
Maximum: 16 per section

Credits: 3


ESE 510
Environmental Education Methods: Applying Educating for Sustainability

COURSE CANCELLED (08/10/05)
Competency Areas: EE – Required alternate; Cert, EAO, CB, IND & RMA – Elective
Priority to ES Env Ed students who are entering their second year.

We will explore the concept of sustainability and the meaning of educating for sustainability as we identify and clarify how these may be incorporated into our work as environmental educators. Pamela Mang writes that sustainability is “the ability of the human species to stay around for the long haul.” What does this mean? How do you define sustainability? What does it require? How can it be? What is the role of education in that process? In probing these questions we will consider the many facets of educating for sustainability through reading, discussion, review and critique of curricula and institutional practice, and developing our own methods of educating for sustainability with focus on application in our work with schools. From habits of mind to regenerative resource management, we will study the emerging field of educating for sustainability to broaden our expertise as environmental educators.

Section A: Sue Gentile
Times: Thursdays, 2:00-4:00 pm
Maximum: 16
(1 seat reserved for Science Education student)
Credits: 2


ESCE 628
Environmental Education Methods: Interpretation

Competency Areas: EE – Required alternate; EAO, CB, Cert, IND & RMA – Elective
Priority to ES Env Ed students who are entering their second year.

Interpreters are a blend of teacher and artists, exciting hearts and souls while making the natural and cultural world relevant to all. Stimulated by our readings, discussions, exercises and visits to existing interpretive programs, we will each craft something we want to interpret, in the medium and the setting that inspire us. Anything goes, at least conceptually: an underground interpretation of subterranean life in New England forests; a turkey vulture observatory at the Harris Center; a guided interpretation of a shopping mall; an underwater brochure for a submarine park, etc. If we’re both educational and artistic in our efforts, both informative and provocative, we just might influence behaviors and beliefs.

Section A: Judy Silverberg
Time: Thursdays, 5:00 – 7:00 pm
September 29 – December 15 & TBA Saturday,
TBA Saturday changed 07/20/05 to: Saturday, November 5
9:00 am – 4:30 pm
Maximum: 16
(1 seat reserved for Science Education student)
Credits: 2


ESE 513
Environmental Education Methods:
The Principles & Paradigms of Educating for Sustainability

Competency Areas: EE – Required Alternate; Cert, EAO, CB, IND & RMA – Elective
Priority to ES Env Ed students who are entering their second year.

What would people know, be like, and be able to do if they were educated for a sustainable future? What are we, as educators and professionals already doing to cultivate the necessary knowledge, skills, and habits of mind in our children? What do we need to do differently?

In this intensive, in-depth professional development course we will increase participants’ awareness, knowledge and understanding of the core, content, competencies and habits of mind that characterize Sustainability Education by:

  • Creating and modeling a learning community, the purpose of which is to teach and learn for sustainability.
  • Engaging participants in activities that integrate the core content of education for sustainability, including systems thinking, sustainable economics, the role of civil society in sustainable communities, place as curriculum and the science of sustainability, creativity and visioning, and multiple perspectives.

Section A: Jaime Cloud
Times: Saturdays & Sundays,
October 15 & 16 and 29 & 30,
Changed 08/30/05 to: Saturday & Sunday, November 5 & 6 and November 12 & 13

9:00 am – 4:30 pm
Maximum: 16
(1 seat reserved for Science Education student)

Credits 2


ESE 533
Environmental Education Methods: Using Writing to Learn

COURSE CANCELLED (08/10/05)
Competency Areas: EE – Required alternate; Cert, EAO, CB, IND & RMA – Elective
Priority to ES Env Ed students who are entering their second year.

Whether used to explore an unfamiliar topic or to demonstrate understanding of a concept, writing complements other learning activities. Using writing as a learning tool improves thinking and communication skills. In this course we will consider the many uses of writing as it works to enhance learning in any subject area. From free writing and note taking to writing poetry, lab reports, essays and journals to proofreading and peer editing, we will practice using writing techniques as educators. This class will investigate ways in which educators can facilitate learning through the writing process in both informal and formal educational programs. Beginning with consideration of “writing to learn” and “writing across the curriculum” as teaching/learning strategies, students will develop a “tool-kit” of writing activities which can be integrated into existing curriculum and informal programming and be utilized with middle elementary school through adult learners.

Section A: Sue Gentile
Time: Thursdays, 5:00-7:00 pm
Maximum: 16
Credits: 2


ESP 551A
Environmental Law

Competency Area: Civic Ecology
(formerly Environmental Issues)
Priority to ES students entering in Fall 05.

This course will survey some critical federal environmental statutes in the United States and highlight important case law decided under those statutes. While an in-depth treatment of environmental law is not possible in a course of this length, we will examine the historical context of the major environmental statutes and regulations as well as their impact on land, air, water, and natural resources. We will explore how law and regulations are passed, and how the judicial, legislative, and executive branches of government and the regulatory agencies function. The course objectives include becoming familiar with a new vocabulary and learning how to read a legal opinion. We will begin to understand what a lawyer does and how to think like a lawyer. This course will test our abilities to spot legal issues and deliver reasoned and reasonable arguments on opposing sides of an issue.

Section A: Rebecca Todd
Time: Thursdays, 8:30 – 11:00 am
Added 08/10/05 to: Saturday, November 5, 8:30 am – 4:30 pm
Maximum: 18
Credits: 3


ESCO 527
Environmental Writing

Competency Area: Elective
Priority to Fall 04 ES entrants.

This course provides an introduction to a variety of styles of environmental writing. Primary focus will be on nature writing as a process of exploring and communicating one’s experience of the natural world. Our emphasis on the relationship between nature writing and storytelling, between inner and outer landscapes, and on how to teach the writing process should also be of interest to those in Education or Psychology. Assignments will enable students of all levels of writing experience to overcome blocks and develop skill, style and voice. Activities will include reading and responding to each other’s work, discussing contemporary nature essays, and meeting with professional writers to explore different writing styles.

Section A: Fred Taylor
Time: Thursdays, 1:00 – 4:00 pm
(Optional field trip to Cape Cod – TBA)
Maximum: 14

Credits: 2


ESE 537
Exploring Possibilities in Education

Competency Areas: Cert; EE, EAO, CB, IND & RMA – Elective
Priority to ES Biology and General Science Certification students.

What makes a great school? And what makes a great teacher? These are the two primary questions we are trying to address. We will visit 4 progressive schools, each for a full day, to explore these guiding questions. We will alternate our school visits with seminars at Antioch. Along the way we’ll struggle with an assortment of related questions like: What kinds of school reform are worthwhile? How defensible is progressive education? What kinds of homework and grading policies and practices do good schools use? How are progressive educators and schools responding to new federal educational policies? In what kinds of public school systems and with what kinds of teachers do students like and thrive?

Description revised 08/10/05:
Exploring Possibilities in Education will consist of 4 full-day field trips (either on a Monday or Wednesday or some combination – this depends on what can be arranged with the schools). We will not meet as a seminar between the visits, except for one 2-hour pre-trip meeting focused primarily on logistics, scheduling, transportation, verifications, etc., and one 3-hour meeting after we’ve visited all of the schools. The pre-trip meeting will be on Wednesday, September 7, from 6:00 – 8:00 pm. We will determine the post-trip meeting at a later date. The school visit dates will be posted as soon as they are confirmed with the schools.

Section A: Jimmy Karlan
Time: Fridays, 8:00 -11:00 am and
4 TBA full-day field trips
Added 08/30/05: Times, Pre-trip meeting: Wednesday, September 7, 5:30 – 8:00 pm

and one post-trip meeting TBA in December

Maximum: 8
Credits: 2


ESE 502
Foundations of Environmental Education

Competency Areas: EE & Cert – Required; EAO, CB, IND, & RMA – Elective
Required of and Priority to ES Environmental Education students who enter Fall 05.

This course will provide a broad overview of the Environmental Education movement by constructing a working definition of its goals and the various manifestations of those goals within local, regional, state, national and international organizations. We will explore the personal values that drive people to choose environmental education as a profession and look at the implications of that choice on lifestyle, civic participation, relationships and work-life. Students will predict possible future scenarios for environmental educators and their role in the organizations that support their efforts.

Sections A & B: Cindy Thomashow
Section A: Wednesdays, 1:00 – 4:00 pm
Section B: Thursdays, 1:00 – 4:00 pm
Maximum: 15 per section
(1 seat per section reserved for Science Education student)

Credits: 3


ES 510
Geographic Information System (GIS): An Integrating Technology

COURSE CANCELLED (08/10/05)
Competency Areas: RMA – Required alternate to Proposal Writing; EAO, EE , IND & Cert – Elective
Priority to RMA students.

This is an introductory course in the use of GIS software to create, manage and work with spatially explicit data. This class will explore how to access GIS information available on the WWW, extract and analyze quantitative data using ArcView 3.2 software, understand limitations associated with various data sources and use software for preparation of maps.

Section A: Fash Farashahi
Time: Fridays, 5:00 – 8:00 pm
Maximum: 12
Credits: 3


ESP 561
Geographic Information System (GIS) for Conservation Biologists

Competency Area Fall 05: CB – Required Civic Ecology, (formerly Environmental Issues)
Required of and Restricted to Conservation Biology students.
Added 08/10/05: Priority to Fall 04 CB Enterers

This is an introductory course in the use of GIS to effectively communicate spatially explicit environmental information. The class will explore how to access GIS information available on the WWW, extract and analyze data using ArcView software, create data files relevant to natural resource inventory work, and effectively transmit results to both lay and technical audiences. This class will emphasize use of GIS in a research context, especially including its role in habitat conservation planning and policy development.

Section A: Jon Atwood
Time: Thursdays, 1:00 – 4:00 pm
Maximum: 12
Credits: 3


ESP 532
Human Dimensions of Conservation Biology

Competency Areas: Civic Ecology

(formerly Environmental Issues)
Priority to ES students entering Fall 05.

This class starts from the premise that conservation biology is the study of inter-connected natural and human systems and that progress in public policy issues associated with conservation biology requires scientific understandings of both ecological systems and human social systems. In this class we will take a scientific approach to understanding peoples’ cognitive and behavioral processes associated with policy problems in conservation biology. This course introduces students not familiar with social sciences to the research and theoretical literature in fields of sociology, anthropology, and political science as applied to problems of conservation biology. Topics include: measuring environmental values and attitudes, pro-environmental behavior, social conflict, public participation, local knowledge, the integration of science and democracy, and institutions for co-management. Practical case studies are used to illustrate theoretical points. The overall purpose of this course is to survey the social sciences literature associated with practice and research in conservation biology to expose students to the importance of treating the human dimensions of conservation biology problems with the same scientific rigor customarily given to the ecological dimensions.

Section A: Thomas Webler
Time: Thursdays, 8:30 – 11:00 am
Maximum: 15
Credits: 3


ESP 530
The Language of Nature

Competency Area Fall 05: Civic Ecology
(formerly Environmental Issues)
Priority to ES students entering Fall 05.

What we know about the environment, how we know it, and who can speak with authority about it, are questions of language as well as science. This course will focus on the power of language in environmental communication. Critical reading of a variety of texts in the history of science, environmental thought, and nature writing will provide a basis for discussion and analysis. Weekly assignments will focus on the development of writing styles and skills.

Section A: Joy Ackerman
Times: Thursdays, 8:30 – 11:00 am
Maximum: 16
(3 seats reserved for Fall 04 ES entrants:
by written permission of instructor only)
Credits: 3


ESF 532
Lichens and Bryophytes

Competency Areas: Natural Communities elective
Priority to Fall 04 ES entrants.

While Lichens and Mosses are not closely related groups of organisms, they are frequently studied together because of their similar habitat, growth form, and ecology. In this course, we will learn identification skills for common lichens and mosses of the Northeast, and we will explore the ecology of these diverse groups.

Naturalists have understood for centuries that lichens can be important indicators of air quality, and many journal articles are written each year exploring the ecological roles of lichens. This course will provide you with the skills to identify lichens, to understand their use as pollution monitors, and to understand the unique qualities that allow them to occupy their important role in ecological succession.

Lacking diverse morphology, bryophytes can be difficult to identify, but we will learn to identify the major groups of mosses and liverworts visually, and will learn the microscopy skills needed to identify most bryophytes to species. We will discuss the ecology of bryophytes with particular attention to ways that mosses are involved with greenhouse gasses and global warming.

Section A: Ralph Pope
Time: Wednesdays, 1:00 – 4:00 pm
Maximum 16
(1 seat reserved for Science Education student)
Credits: 3


ES 699C
Master’s Thesis

Required for all CB students; optional for EAO, EE, Cert, IND, & RMA students.
Prerequisite: Master’s Thesis Seminar

It is recommended that students register for this in their 5th semester.

Note: Students must have written permission from their thesis advisor prior to registration

As a culmination of a student’s work at Antioch, the Master’s Thesis should reflect the student’s particular focus of study and future professional interest. This effort will include a central research component associated with it. The research can be quantitative, qualitative or literary in nature. All Environmental Studies students are required to have approval from their advisor prior to entering the Master’s Thesis process.

Section A: Jon Atwood
Section B: Peter Palmiotto
Section C: Rachel Thiet

Section D: Jim Jordan
Section E: Beth Kaplin
Section F: Meade Cadot
Added 08/10/05:
Section G: Tom Wessels
Section H: Michael Simpson

Maximum: 5 per section
Credits: 3


ES 699D
Master’s Thesis Continuation

Required for all students continuing a Master’s Thesis for which they have previously registered.

Students must register for Master’s Thesis Continuation every semester until the thesis has been completed and signed off by the Master’s Thesis reader. Submit the Thesis Continuation Progress Report (see Thesis Guidebook) to your Thesis Advisor at the time of registration. Enrollment in Master’s Thesis continuation confers half-time status for loan deferment purposes through December 20.

Section A: Jon Atwood

Section B: Peter Palmiotto
Section C: Rachel Thiet
Section D: Jim Jordan
Section E: Beth Kaplin
Section F: Meade Cadot
Maximum: 5 per section
Credits: uncredited


ESP 541
Music and Nature

Competency Area: Civic Ecology
(formerly Environmental Issues)
Priority to ES students entering Fall 05.

This course will cover the following themes:

- The Ecological and Evolutionary Origins of Music reflects an emerging interdisciplinary inquiry incorporating evolutionary biology, behavioral biology, field natural history, anthropology, linguistics, and cognitive psychology. When you ask a question such as “why do birds sing?” you arrive at the mysterious confluence of science, philosophy, and music.

- Ethnomusicology compares the way various cultures derive music from nature. Historically, ethnomusicology considers various music-making systems and has a clear anthropological approach. In this class, we will be particularly interested in music as the interface between humans and nature, exploring how different cultures interpret that interface through their music and hence through their ecological worldview.

- Acoustic Ecology is another fast growing interdiscplinary field which seeks to evaluate habitat, quality of life, and ecological integrity by virtue of the sounds of nature, juxtaposed with the sounds of built environments. Research in this realm ranges from the effects of sonar on whales to phenology and climate change, to town and regional planning.

- Composition, Interpretation and Performance will reflect the wide variety of types of students who might take this class. For example, conservation biology students will have opportunities to perform habitat or species level research, environmental education and certification students might learn how to apply such studies to interpretive settings, environmental advocacy and RMA students might consider the fascinating relationship between ecological sustainability and noise. Musicians will be able to use the material from this class as a way to explore their music. All students, regardless of interest or program, will be required to develop their musical awareness, as a means to cultivate biospheric perception. This class will have a strong experiential orientation…we will do a lot of listening…always a good thing!!!!!

Section A: Mitchell Thomashow
Time: Thursdays, 8:30 – 11:00 am
Maximum: 15
Credits: 3


ESF 514
New England Flora

Competency Area: Natural Communities

Priority to Fall 04 ES entrants.

This course will be an introduction to the vascular flora of New England with special attention given to fall herbaceous plants and woody plants in winter and summer conditions. The course will cover both plant structure and taxonomy, and will include laboratory and fieldwork.

Section A: Ralph Pope
Changed 10/18/05 to: Ralph Pope & Melissa Harty
Time: Thursdays, 8:00 – 11:00 am
Maximum: 16
(1 seat reserved for
Science Education student)

Credits: 3


ES 515
Organizing Social Movements & Campaigns

Competency Areas EAO – Required; CB, EE, Cert, IND, & RMA – Elective
Required of and Priority to Environmental Advocacy students.

Want to learn how to be an effective citizen activist, organizer, reformer, or rebel? This class will look at the best strategies and tactics of progressive social movements and campaigns in the United States as well as consider case studies of movements from around the world. Attention will be given to exploring theories of social power, stages of movement mobilization, action strategies, advocacy roles, power-holder responses, and the mechanisms and levels of social movement success. The goal of the course will be to help students see themselves as part of a long activist tradition and reflect on how best to build powerful social movements, win the active support of key sectors of the populace, and achieve campaign objectives even in the face of power-holder opposition. The course will include 20 hours fieldwork and a group strategy-planning project.

Section A: Steve Chase
Time: Thursdays, 1:00 – 4:00 pm
Maximum: 16
Credits: 3


ESF 515
Ornithology

Competency Area: Natural Communities
Priority to Fall 04 ES entrants.

This course provides an overview of avian evolution, taxonomy, anatomy, behavior and conservation. In addition to occasional local field trips during the regular class time, there will be 1-2 all-day weekend trips to be scheduled during the first class meeting. Selections from the PBS series, “The Life of Birds” will supplement in-class lecture material.

Section A: Jon Atwood
Time: Fridays, 8:00 – 11:00 am

Maximum: 16
Credits: 3


ESP 524
Patterns of Environmental Activism

Competency Area: Fall 05: Civic Ecology
(formerly Environmental Issues)
Priority to ES students who are entering Fall 05.

Environmentalism is a very broad and diverse social movement, with many different streams and tributaries–some mainstream, some radical, some progressive, and some reactionary. In this course, we will not only explore the diversity of the last four decades of environmental thought and activism in the United States, but also the thoughts and actions of earlier advocates of preserving wildlands, protecting public health, and promoting more sustainable approaches to living on the earth. The goals of the course are to 1) explore the diversity of response thoughtful people have had to the negative environmental consequences of our urban, industrial capitalist society; 2) develop a more critical understanding of the forces arrayed against moving our societies in the direction of greater justice, democracy, environmental protection, public health, and long term sustainability; and 3) identify what each of us can contribute to the future of a renewed environmental movement as professionals, consumers, and citizens.

Section A: Steve Chase
Time: Thursdays, 8:30 – 11:00 am
Maximum: 15
Credits: 3


ES 693
Practicum, General
Practicum Seminar

Competency Areas: EAO, CB, EE, Cert, IND & RMA – Required

A total of 8 General Practicum credits are required for Environmental Advocacy & Organizing, Conservation Biology, Environmental Education, Resource Management and Administration and those pursuing Individualized Programs. A total of 2 General Practicum credits are required for certification majors in addition to 6 credits of Student Teaching. It is strongly recommended that students not register for Practicum until after completing their second semester in the program.

The Practicum provides students with an opportunity to apply, in an organizational setting, what they are learning and to develop professional contacts within their fields of interest. While students are responsible for locating practica, faculty is available to provide support and information as needed. All students are required to attend a scheduled Practicum Orientation during their first semester.

The Practicum Seminar provides a setting in which students can discuss specific issues and concerns, and a format for presenting their accomplished projects. Students will meet privately with the instructor one time during the semester.

Section A: Kay Delanoy
Section B: Bo Hoppin
Changed 07/20/05 to: Paul Bocko
Section C: Christa Koehler
Changed 07/20/05 to: Melissa Diven
Section D: Duncan Watson

Time: Sections A & B: Thursdays,
September 8, December 1 & 8,
11:15 am – 12:45 pm
Sections C & D: Fridays,
September 9, December 2 & 9,
11:15 am – 12:45 pm
Maximum: 15 per section

Credits: variable
(Practicum Seminar credited as part of Practicum)


ESE 521
Problem-Solving & Inquiry-Based Science Teaching

Competency Areas: Gen Sci Cert – Required; EE – Methods Required alternate; EAO, CB, IND & RMA – Elective
First Priority to Fall 05 ES Certification students.

Second Priority to Fall 04 ES Environmental Education entrants.

Teaching science concepts through problem-solving and inquiry-based approaches in middle schools or at environmental learning centers challenges educators to remove themselves from the podium of answers and to become partners in discovery. In this new position, success is proportional to the frequency a teacher or environmental educator says, “I don’t know, how do you think we can find out?” Teaching and learning through these approaches is both cognitively and emotionally stimulating.

We will engage with a variety of physical, life, and environmental problems and inquiries. We will reflect on these experiences from the perspectives of learners and teachers and consider the multiple dimensions of these approaches to teaching science concepts in our respective educational environments.

Section A: Jimmy Karlan
Time: Thursdays, 1:00 – 4:00 pm
Maximum: 16

(1 seat reserved for Science Education student)
Credits: 3


ESACO 503
Proposal Writing and the Grants Process

Competency Areas: RMA – Required alternate to GIS; CB, EE, Cert, EAO, & IND – Elective
Priority to Fall 04 RMA entrants.

This course will focus on gaining competency in the three phases of the grants process: planning, research, and writing. Students will research and explore public and private funding sources appropriate to the human services and environmental fields. The criteria for selecting potential funding sources, the basic elements of a proposal, and developing successful collaborative efforts will be emphasized. Students will interactively engage in each phase of the process and will demonstrate their learning through submission of a proposal abstract and evidence of research in the public and private sectors.

Section A: Jim Gruber
Time: Fridays, September 2 – October 21,
8:00 – 11:00 am,
Maximum: 16
Credits: 2


ESF 551
Reptile Field Biology

Competency Areas: EAO, CB, EE, Cert, IND & RMA – Natural Communities
Priority to Fall 04 ES entrants.

Students are introduced to the varied and complex life history strategies of New England reptiles by finding them in the field, observing them in class and on their own, and with lecture notes. By supplementing field work with a literature survey, students will better understand the varied survival requirements for vertebrates with complex life histories, conservation issues, and difficulties for managing reptile populations. Classroom lectures, discussions, demonstrations (live animals, video, slides), field sessions to New England locales, and library work are scheduled. Students are expected to complete an extensive literature survey on a topic of their own choosing.

Section A: Tom Tyning
Times Fridays, September 2 & 9,
7:00 – 9:30 pm, and
Saturdays, September 3,
8:30 am – 4:30 pm and
September 10,
8:30 am – 8:30 pm
Maximum: 16

Credits: 2


ESE 520
Science Teaching Methods

Competency Areas: Cert – Required; EE – EE Methods Required alternate; EAO, CB, IND & RMA – Elective
Required of and Priority to Fall 04 ES Certification students.

Science Teaching Methods is designed to help prepare students to be able to effectively teach science at the high school or middle school level. The course takes place at Compass School, an independent middle and high school in Westminster, VT (25 minutes from Antioch). Participants will have the opportunity to observe experienced teachers in action and to interact with middle and high school students, using these interactions as a forum for discovery, growth, and practice of teaching methods. We will practice classroom management strategies, communication techniques, curriculum design and lesson planning, assessment, and lab methods and safety.

Section A: Eric Rhomberg
Added 08/10/05: Steve Holmes & Louise Van Order
Time: Thursdays, 1:00 – 4:00 pm
Location: Compass School, Bellows Falls, VT
Maximum: 16
Credits: 3


ES 690

SIS: Supervised Independent Study

If you are planning an independent study, please register for an SIS on your registration form; however, an SIS contract must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office by December 1, 2005 in order for it to appear on your schedule or transcript. Please be sure to specify on the contract if the SIS will be used to fulfill a competency area or serve as a required course submtitute, or as an elective. Contracts received after the December 1st deadline will be returned to you for registration in a subsequent semester (additional costs may apply). Credits will not appear on your schedule until the SIS contract(s) has been submitted to the Registrar’s Office, thus affecting your enrollment status and perhaps your financial aid eligibility.

Credits: Variable


ES 690U
SIS: Special Project

Competency Areas: RMA – Required for students not doing a Masters Thesis; EE & Cert – Optional, Elective

The Special Project will be conducted as a supervised independent study. As a culmination of a student’s work at Antioch, the Special Project is comparable to a master’s thesis in scope, but differs in that it is not focused on research design. The Special Project follows standardized approaches used in a student’s chosen field such as a solid waste plan, a curriculum development plan, or a marketing plan. The Special Project’s content and format must be approved by both the student’s advisor and program chair, but may be supervised by a qualified person external to the department.

Note: RMA Students are required to complete either a Special Project or a Master’s Thesis.

Please register for an SIS on your registration form; however, an SIS contract must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office by December 1, 2005 in order for it to appear on your schedule or transcript. Please be sure to specify on the contract if the SIS will be used to fulfill a competency area or serve as a required course substitute, or as an elective. Contracts received after the December 1st deadline will be returned to you for registration in a subsequent semester (additional costs may apply). Credits will not appear on your schedule until the SIS contract(s) has been submitted to the Registrar’s Office, thus affecting your enrollment status and perhaps your financial aid eligibility.

Credits: 3


ESE 522
Teaching Exceptional Children: Focus on Adolescence

Competency Areas: Cert – Required; EE – EE Methods Required alternate; EAO, CB, IND & RMA – Elective
Required of and Priority to ES Certification students.

Adolescent children and those with special needs present the classroom teacher with a wide variety of challenges in terms of management, motivation, and relationships. This course is designed to familiarize the student with special educational needs of adolescents who have a range of cognitive, physical or emotionally handicapping conditions. Related topics that will be covered include: Special Education (legal) requirements within school systems; developmental issues; the Individual Education Plan (IEP); curriculum adaptations; and issues in mainstreaming and normalization.

Section A: Maureen Greene
Time: Thursdays, 5:00 – 8:00 pm
Changed 08/30/05 to: Thursdays, September 15 & 29; October 13 & 27; November 10 & 17; December 8 & 15
5:00 – 8:15

Maximum: 16
(1 seat reserved for Science Education student)
Credits: 2


ESS 520

Wetland Delineation and Evaluation
Competency Areas: EAO, CB, EE, Cert, IND & RMA – Elective
Pre-requisites: Wetlands Ecology, NRI – Veg, Soils Mapping and Interpretation, or Wetlands Flora

Priority to students who are entering their second year.

Whether you are planning to be a regional/local wetlands administrator, serve on your local conservation commission or more formally perform or evaluate work in or adjacent to wetlands, this course will provide you with the field skills and experience from which to build your reputation in the wetlands arena. The course will utilize the 1987 US Army Corp of Engineers wetlands delineation methodology. This is the currently preferred methodology for those seeking to become a ‘certified’ wetlands scientist. The course will also review methodologies for wetlands assessment including the NH Method for Evaluating Non-Tidal Wetlands and the Army Corps’s Highway Methodology. Students will work in teams to field test such methodologies at the scale of a micro-watershed.

Pre-requisites for this course are: wetlands ecology and watershed science or hydrology. In addition, students need to have successfully completed one of the following courses: vegetation/soils module of the natural resource inventory courses (NRI), soils: mapping and interpretation, wetlands flora or New England. Flora.

Section A: Michael Simpson
Time: Fridays, September 2 – October 21
1:00 – 4:00 pm and
Saturdays, September 3 & 10,
9:00 am – 4:30 pm
Maximum: 14
Credits: 2


ESS 568
Wildlife and Forest Management

Competency Areas: CB & RMA – Required alternate; EAO, EE, Cert & IND – Elective
Priority CB* & RMA students.
*CB Priority goes to students who didn’t take either Wetlands Ecology or Forest Ecosystem Analysis in the summer

For environmental professionals, the best and most frequent opportunities to positively affect wildlife are through habitat management and protection. The objective of this course is to equip students to plan habitat management for birds and mammals of the northeastern states. This course will also address guidelines for integrating timber and wildlife management. The major course project is the development of a detailed wildlife management plan for a specific large parcel of land using the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture S.C.S. approach and including a budget showing potential for timber and cordwood sales to cover costs.

Section A: Meade Cadot
Time: Fridays, 1:00 – 4:00 pm
Location: Harris Center, Hancock and Antioch
Maximum: 16
Credits: 2


Doctoral Program (Ph.D)


ES 775
Candidacy Continuation

Competency Area: Dissertation Process
Restricted to students who have completed three years of the program, but have not completed their Service Project, Integrated Essay, or Dissertation Proposal.

The Candidacy Continuation semester is designed for students who need additional time to complete their doctoral candidacy projects. Students retain full access to faculty and all student resources at Antioch. During this semester they continue to work independently with their advisor and the rest of the faculty as needed to complete their service project, integrated essay, doctoral dissertation proposal. Students may schedule their Dissertation Proposal Review meeting during this candidacy continuation semester.

Registration in Candidacy Continuation will carry half-time status for loan deferment and Financial Aid purposes.

Section A: Beth Kaplin
Maximum: 15
Credits: uncredited


ES 702
Comparative Ecological Analysis

Competency Area: Foundation
Required of and Restricted to PhD I students.

This course is designed to provide participants with the methods and strategies needed to apply ecological principles in research. Interpretive tools, research methods, and theoretical approaches include basic statistical analysis and design, field ecology techniques, and computer models or simulations. Using ecological principles as a foundation, other approaches such as natural resource inventory, ecological impact assessment, and ecological restoration are covered. The course has a case study orientation, emphasizing contemporary ecological problems in diverse habitats, exploring the common problems and solutions that emerge.

Section A: Beth Kaplin
Times: Saturdays, 2:00 – 7:00 pm and
Sundays, 8:00 am – 12:00 pm
September 10 & 11, October 8 & 9,
November 5 & 6, December 3 & 4

(Additional contact hours will be met
by specific coursework designed
to be completed on-line.)
Maximum: 15
Credits: 4


ES 776
Dissertation Seminar

Competency Area: Dissertation Process
Restricted to PhD IV students.
Prerequistites: Completion of the Integrated Essay, Service Project, and approved Dissertation Proposal. Students should be actively engaged in researching and writing the dissertation.

This seminar is designed to provide support, consultation, and limited instruction for students carrying out their doctoral dissertation research, and is composed of three different workshops: a writing workshop, a qualitative methods workshop, and a quantitative methods workshop (see descriptions below), each led by a different instructor. All students will participate in the writing workshop (Friday afternoon and Saturday morning) and will select either the quantitative or qualitative workshop to participate in. These latter two workshops are offered concurrently Saturday afternoon and Sunday morning. Students, along with the instructors, are intended to serve as a peer community, providing support, advice, and critique. See workshops below:

Section A: Thomas Webler
Times: Fridays, 1:00 – 7:00 pm and
Saturdays, 8:00 am – 12:00 pm and

2:00 – 6:00 pm and
Sundays, 8:00 am – 12:00 pm
September 9, 10 & 11
November 4, 5 & 6
Maximum: 12
Credits: 4


Writing Workshop (10 contact hours)

This workshop will offer students the opportunity to focus on their writing skills and specifically parts of their dissertation they may be struggling to write. Writing and editing during the semester in a seminar setting will give students the support they need to move through writing issues and blockages.
September 9 & 10 and November 4 & 5

These next two run concurrently, both are 10 contact hours:

Quantitative/Statistical

Analyses Workshop

This is a hands on consulting session; students should bring in questions and problems with their data sets, research design and analyses questions, and an instructor is available to work with the students. By participating in this workshop the student not only obtains assistance with research design and data analysis, they also learn as they listen to questions and responses between classmates and the instructor.
September 10 & 11 and November 5 & 6

Qualitative Analyses/Ethnographic Approaches Workshop

This is a hands on consulting session; students bring in questions and problems with their data sets, research design and analyses questions, and an instructor is available to work with the students. By participating in this workshop the student not only obtains assistance with their research design and data analysis, they also learn as they listen to questions and responses between classmates and the instructor.
September 10 & 11 and November 5 & 6


ES 899
Doctoral Dissertation

Competency Area: Dissertation Process
Restricted to PhD IV students.

Students who are actively engaged in writing the doctoral dissertation are required to register for these credits. You cannot register for this class unless your dissertation proposal has been approved by your committee.

Section A: Doctoral Faculty
Maximum: 15
Credits: 4


ES 899C
Doctoral Dissertation Continuation

Competency Area: Dissertation Process
Restricted to PhD V+ students who have registered for two semesters of ES 899 Doctoral Dissertation, and have not completed the dissertation.

Section A: Doctoral Faculty
Maximum: 15

Credits: uncredited


ES 704
Environmental History

Competency Area: Foundation
Required of and Restricted to PhD I students.

This course examines the historical, cultural, and philosophical origins of our concepts of the environment. This course provides an overview of the environmental history of the US, world environmental history, and indigenous views of environmental history. Students participate in many approaches to history, from histographical, social, political, and literary history to artistic and mythic approaches. In this course, students develop a framework for understanding how our conception of the environment has changed through time, and strengthen their understanding of how historical and philosophical issues engage and inform current debates.

Section A: Alesia Maltz
Times: Fridays 1:00 – 7:00 pm and
Saturdays, 8:00 am – 12:00 pm
September 9 & 10, October 7 & 8,
November 4 & 5, December 2 & 3

(Additional contact hours will be met by specific
coursework designed to be completed on-line.)
Maximum: 15
Credits: 4


ES 771
Integrated Essay

Competency Area: Integrated Projects
Restricted to PhD III students.

The Integrated Essay is the culmination of the learning domain. It is an opportunity for students to organize, interpret, and amplify their core scholarly interests. The essay represents the ability to synthesize and conceptualize knowledge, to contribute new ideas to an emerging field of study, to express the theoretical and practical significance of these ideas, and to consider their consequences for scholarship, research, and/or professional practice. Throughout the learning domain, students explore widely, noting convergences, connections, and interstices – nodes and networks of intellectual resonance that contain deep insights. The purpose of the Integrated Essay is to cultivate those insights, by exploring them in depth, tracing their formulation, development, and application.

Note: The Integrated Essay does not meet as a course. The project is discussed in the Theory and Practice Seminar. The student receives credit upon satisfactory completion of the integrated essay.

Section A: Joy Ackerman
Maximum: 12

Credits: 4


ES 720
Reading Seminar I

Competency Area: Foundation
Required of and Restricted to PhD II students.
Open to ES Masters students by written permission of instructor attached to or on registration form.

The purpose of the reading seminars is to allow students and faculty to engage in reading and writing on topics of mutual interest. During the Spring of Year One, faculty (in consultation with students) develop a list of proposed seminars, reflecting their own interests and the emerging areas of interest in the learning community. During the Summer of Year Two, students and faculty select the reading topics that are of most interest. In effect, the learning community constructs these specialized seminars. Reading seminars are particularly useful as a way to study bodies of knowledge and substantive themes that are of community wide interest.

Section A: Alesia Maltz
Times: TBA
(Additional contact hours will be met by specific
course work designed to be completed on-line.)
Maximum: 15
Credits: 3


ES 721
Reading Seminar II

Competency Area: Foundation
Required of and Restricted to PhD II students.
Open to ES Masters students by written permission of instructor attached to or on registration form.

The purpose of the reading seminars is to allow students and faculty to engage in reading and writing on topics of mutual interest. During the Spring of Year One, faculty (in consultation with students) develop a list of proposed seminars, reflecting their own interests and the emerging areas of interest in the learning community. During the Summer of Year Two, students and faculty select the reading topics that are of most interest. In effect, the learning community constructs these specialized seminars. Reading seminars are particularly useful as a way to study bodies of knowledge and substantive themes that are of community wide interest.

Section A: Mitch Thomashow
Times: TBA
(Additional contact hours will be met by specific
course work designed to be completed on-line.)
Maximum: 15
Credits: 3


ES 722
Reading Seminar III

Competency Area: Foundation
Required of and Restricted to PhD II students.
Open to ES Masters students by written permission of instructor attached to or on registration form.

The purpose of the reading seminars is to allow students and faculty to engage in reading and writing on topics of mutual interest. During the Spring of Year One, faculty (in consultation with students) develop a list of proposed seminars, reflecting their own interests and the emerging areas of interest in the learning community. During the Summer of Year Two, students and faculty select the reading topics that are of most interest. In effect, the learning community constructs these specialized seminars. Reading seminars are particularly useful as a way to study bodies of knowledge and substantive themes that are of community wide interest.

Section A: Beth Kaplin
Times: TBA
(Additional contact hours will be met by specific
course work designed to be completed on-line.)
Maximum: 15
Credits: 3


ES 723
Reading Seminar IV

Competency Area: Foundation
Required of and Restricted to PhD II students.
Open to ES Masters students by written permission of instructor attached to or on registration form.

The purpose of the reading seminars is to allow students and faculty to engage in reading and writing on topics of mutual interest. During the Spring of Year One, faculty (in consultation with students) develop a list of proposed seminars, reflecting their own interests and the emerging areas of interest in the learning community. During the Summer of Year Two, students and faculty select the reading topics that are of most interest. In effect, the learning community constructs these specialized seminars. Reading seminars are particularly useful as a way to study bodies of knowledge and substantive themes that are of community wide interest.

Section A: Thomas Webler
Times: TBA
(Additional contact hours will be met by specific
course work designed to be completed on-line.)
Maximum: 15
Credits: 3


ES 728
Research Strategy: Theory, Method and Design II

Competency Area: Research Strategies and Learning Domains
Required of and Restricted to PhD II students.

The meaning and nature of scholarly research in the field of environmental studies is changing tremendously. While positivist approaches still dominate, interdisciplinary, post-positivistic, creative, reflexive, and innovative research methods presently enjoy a previously unachieved level of scholarly acceptance. Why? Because our present social-environmental condition cries out for more comprehensive understandings. Positivist research is powerful and effective, but innovative research lies at the core of revitalizing prevalent beliefs and perspectives on social-environmental dynamics.

In the second semester of this two-semester research seminar, we learn the strategy of four major qualitative methods: the case study, grounded theory, ethnography, and action research. As a counterbalance to this strategic thinking, we emphasize developing research skills. Students will do field work in the following techniques: observation, research interviewing, coding and analysis, and participatory research. Major emphasis will be placed on completing a grounded theory project, building off interviews done by the entire class.

Section A: Thomas Webler
Times: Fridays, 1:00 – 7:00 pm and
Saturdays, 8:00 am – 12:00 pm
September 9 & 10
November 4 & 5 and December 2 & 3
(Additional contact hours will be met by specific

course work designed to be completed on-line.)
Maximum: 15
Credits: 3


ES 752
Service Project

Competency Area: Integrated Projects

Required of and Restricted to PhD III students.

The Service Project is an opportunity to cooperate with a specific institutional, organizational, or community group addressing concerns of relevance to the student’s academic work. This provides a public context for one’s scholarly interests, both providing expertise to a project, and allowing the student to learn from the experience of the community, building broad coalitions for environmental work, and using the doctoral learning process as a service for diverse constituencies.

Note: The Service Project does not meet as a course. The project is discussed in the Theory and Practice Seminar. The student receives credit upon satisfactory completion of the Service Project essay.

Section A: Heidi Watts
Maximum: 12
Time: To be arranged with instructor

Credits: 4


ES 890

SIS: Supervised Independent Study

If you are planning an independent study, please register for an SIS on your registration form; however, an SIS contract must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office by December 1, 2005 in order for it to appear on your schedule or transcript. Please be sure to specify on the contract if the SIS will be used to fulfill a competency area or serve as a required course substitute, or as an elective. Contracts received after the December 1st deadline will be returned to you for registration in a subsequent semester (additional costs may apply). Credits will not appear on your schedule until the SIS contract(s) has been submitted to the Registrar’s Office, thus affecting your enrollment status and perhaps your financial aid eligibility.

Credits: Variable


ES 761
Theory and Practice Seminar II

Competency Area: Integrated Projects
Restricted to PhD III students.

This seminar is designed to provide a forum for consultation and critique as students work on their Service Projects and Integrated Essay. It provides participants with an opportunity to discuss the meaning of scholarship and service as they are engaged in their projects. This seminar will explore questions such as claims to knowledge, the role of the expert, the relationship between scholarship and political action, the political context of environmental research, and issues of uncertainty and ambiguity. What are the special problems encountered by the environmental researcher who is actively involved in community projects? What is the role of scholarship for the activist? How might research contribute to social change and environmental action?

Section A: Joy Ackerman & Heidi Watts
Times: Fridays, 1:00 – 7:00 pm and
Sundays, 8:00 am – 12:00 pm
September 9 & 11 and November 4 & 6
(Additional contact hours will be met by specific
coursework designed to be completed on-line.)
Maximum: 15
Credits: 3