Education Courses Fall 2005

Experienced Educators Program
Integrated Learning & Waldorf Program


Experienced Educators Program


EDT 611
Learning Theory

Competency Area: Theoretical & Philosophical Foundations of Education

Restricted to Fall 05 entering Experienced Educator students; others by written permission of the Program Director attached to or on registration form.

How do children think and learn? What is intelligence? What is the role of emotion in education? How do biology and the environment interact to create a unique human mind? Developmental theories abound – Piaget, Vygotsky, Erikson, Kohlberg, Kegan, Gilligan. Some models describe broad stages of development that clump a range of human characteristics. Recent work has been focused more narrowly on the unfolding of a single skill or trait. Learning has been variably ascribed to information processing, cognitive processes, constructivism, and social constructivism. Are there theories and models that can effectively guide us in our approach to teaching? How do we best support our students as they develop, mature, and gain knowledge, skills, and understanding?

Section H: Springfield VT 2005: Susan Dreyer Leon
Section I: Pembroke NH 2005: Thomas Julius
Time: Fridays, September 23, October 21,

November 11, and December 9,
4:30 – 8:30 pm, and
Saturdays, September 24, October 22,
November 12, and December 10,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 20 per section
Credits: 3


ED 699C
Master’s Project Continuation

Required of all students continuing a Master’s Project for which they have previously registered.

Students must register for Master’s Project Continuation every semester until the project has been completed and signed off by your Master’s Project reader. Enrollment in Master’s Project Continuation confers half-time status for loan deferment purposes through December 20.

Section A: Education Faculty
Credits: uncredited


EDT 533
Philosophy of Education

Competency Area: Theoretical & Philosophical Foundations of Education
Restricted to Continuing Experienced Educator students; others by written permission of the Program Director attached to or on registration form.

A basic assumption of this course is that every school person either has a conscious philosophy of education or behaves as if he or she has one. That is, not having a philosophy, the teacher follows set patterns of classroom organization, expectations of children’s behavior, curriculum, etc. which enforce purposes arrived at by someone else, or which were never intellectually formulated in the first place. Such a person lacks direction: when to support the system, when and how to challenge it, where to set personal limits on compromise?

Through readings, discussion, introspection, and the comparison between ideals and experience, students will be expected to define personal systems of beliefs and operation compatible with their values and the state of their wisdom. American education will be examined from a social, political, and economic perspective, considering the impact of concurrent events in these realms on the structure and character of education from 1900 to the present.

Section F: Keene 2004 Cluster: Arthur Auer
Section G: School Choice Cluster: Peter Eppig
Time: Fridays, September 23, October 21,
November 11, and December 9,
4:30 – 8:30 pm, and
Saturdays, September 24, October 22,
November 12, and December 10,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 18 per section

Credits: 3


ED 693A
Practicum – Practicum Seminar

Restricted to Continuing Experienced Educator students.

The purpose of the Practicum is to assist students in integrating theoretical knowledge gained through reading and seminars with their experience as teachers. The emphasis in the Practicum is upon self-evaluation, reflection, and articulation of experience. Students may call on faculty consultants for particular assistance with classroom practices. A reflective journal is required of all students. Some time during each class meeting will be devoted to practicum-related issues, such as discussion of classroom practice, reflective journal writing, and theoretical applications to teaching.

Section F: Keene 2004 Cluster: Staff
Section G: School Choice Cluster: Staff
Credits: 3


ED 693C
Practicum – Practicum Seminar

Restricted to Experienced Educator students entering in Fall 05.

The purpose of the Practicum is to assist students in integrating theoretical knowledge gained through reading and seminars with their experience as teachers. The emphasis in the Practicum is upon self-evaluation, reflection, and articulation of experience. Students may call on faculty consultants for particular assistance with classroom practices. A reflective journal is required of all students. Some time during each cluster meeting will be devoted to Practicum related issues, such as discussion of classroom practice, reflective journal writing, and theoretical applications to teaching.

Section H: Springfield VT: Staff

Section I: Pembroke NH: Staff
Credits: 2


ED 690
Supervised Independent Study

If you are planning an independent study, please register for an SIS on your registration form; however, an SIS contract must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office by December 1, 2005 in order for it to appear on your schedule or transcript. Please be sure to specify on the contract if the SIS will be used to fulfill a competency area or serve as a required course substitute, or as an elective. Contracts received after the December 1st deadline will be returned for registration in a subsequent semester (additional costs may apply). Credits will not appear on your schedule until the SIS contract(s) has been submitted to the Registrar’s Office, thus affecting your enrollment status and perhaps your financial aid eligibility.


Integrated Learning & Waldorf Program


EDC 622
Assessment: A Focus on Learning

Competency Area: Curriculum & Instruction
(Critical Skills designated/based course)

Assessment should focus more on improving learning than merely auditing it. To support the learning process, assessment needs to be seen as a rich process of feedback, based on evidence related to clearly identified standards and criteria. This course will focus on assessment, embedded in the learning process, that is intended to promote student learning and growth towards a wide range of outcomes. Together, we will look at principles of authentic assessment, explore best assessment practices and develop assessment tools and strategies to best support student learning.

Section A: Thomas Julius
Time: Saturdays, September 17 & October 8,
9:00 am – 4:30 pm

Maximum: 18
(1 seat reserved for ES student)
Credits: 1


EDC 629
Building Learning Communities

Competency Area: Curriculum & Instruction

(Critical Skills designated/based course)

What can we do to ensure that students learn self-direction, ethical character, curiosity and wonder, while also attending to high quality work and becoming valued members of the community? Experience shows us that the most authentic learning communities grow from the work that teachers, students, administrators and school staff do together. This course will provide practical strategies for creating safe, productive, and collaborative classrooms. Topics will include the stages of developing learning communities and building community through meaningful work. We will examine the role of classroom rituals, traditions, democratic rules, and positive consequences.

Section A: Maura Hart
Time: Saturdays, October 15 & December 3,
9:00 am – 4:30 pm
Maximum: 18

(1 seat reserved for ES student)
Credits: 1


EDC 571A
Classroom Drawing

Competency Area: Curriculum & Instruction
Restricted to Waldorf students; others by written permission of Program Director attached to or on registration form.

In this course students practice drawing as it relates to the Waldorf curriculum in grades one through six. Particular emphasis is placed on how this artistic activity connects with the development of the child and enhances the learning of particular subjects. Students will experience a variety of methods and materials including beeswax crayons, colored pencils, and chalk for blackboard drawing. The techniques learned in this course are adaptable to non-Waldorf settings and students from other programs are welcome.

Section A: Elizabeth Auer
Time: Saturdays, September 17 & October 15,
9:00 am – 4:30 pm
Maximum: 18
Credits: 1


EDP 627
Education for Social Renewal

Competency Area: Education & Social Policy
Restricted to Distant summer sequence Waldorf Students.

This course will give students an opportunity to examine the social and pedagogical basis for Waldorf education. How do children interact in a Waldorf classroom? How can a teacher prepare to meet the emotional as well as academic needs of students? What is the philosophic framework for teacher preparation? How can a teacher remain inspired, enthusiastic? Students will share their research on topics chosen the previous summer, reflect on readings assigned, and submit journal entries to an online partner. Final documentation will include a 20-page paper, quotations selected from the readings, and a review submitted by the journal partner. All work will need to be completed by December 16. FirstClass access is required.

Section A: Torin Finser
Time: Online via FirstClass
Maximum: 12
Credits: 4


EDT 586
Evolving Consciousness II

Competency Area: Theoretical & Philosophical Foundations of Education
Required of Waldorf students; others by written permission of Program Director attached to or on registration form.

This course is the sequel to the introduction of anthroposophical concepts presented in the summer. During this term, world evolution and esoteric history will be considered from the standpoint of the evolving consciousness of humanity as characterized by Rudolf Steiner. Steiner’s relationship to other educational philosophers and the history of educational thought will also be considered. We will start each session by playing the recorder.

Section A: Torin Finser

Time: Fridays, 8:30 – 11: 00 am
Maximum: 24
Credits: 3


EDT 572
Human Development: Focus on Childhood

Competency Area: Theoretical & Philosophical Foundations of Education

Required of and Priority to Elementary and Early Childhood certification students.

Good teaching stems from a grasp of the principles and purposes of human development. A vision of development provides the biological and philosophical underpinnings of informed education. By examining the