Clinical Psychology Courses Fall 2005


PY 898

Advanced Practicum
Restricted to Year IV students.

An optional Practicum for Year IV students wishing to have extensive further clinical training for more than 12 hours per week, with a minimum of 300 hours per semester.

Section A: Lorraine Mangione
Credits: 3


PY 740B
Advanced Seminar: Clinical Child Psychology – Psychopathology and Assessment

Competency Area: Assessment
Restricted to Year III and Year IV students.
Priority to Year IV students.

This course examines psychopathology from infancy through early adolescence. The paradigm of developmental psychopathology, or articulating the role of time and change in childhood disturbances, is an important focus of the class. Using this frame, the following areas are examined: clinical assessment of psychosocial problems in childhood; diagnostic systems for conceptualizing childhood psychopathology; and understanding disturbances of childhood through the lenses of intrapsychic, interpersonal, and the historical context. While students doing child and family therapy are encouraged to consider this class, those without a child or adolescent in their caseload may participate.

Section A: William Halikias
Time: Mondays, 4:30 – 7:00 pm
Maximum: 12
Credits: 3


PYB 710
Advanced Seminar: Clinical Psychopharmacology

Competency Area: Biological Bases of Behavior
Restricted to Year III and Year IV students.
Priority to Year IV students.
Prerequisite: PY 710 Biological Foundations of Clinical Psychology

This course is designed to provide an in-depth survey of current theory and practice of clinical psychopharmacology. Pharmacotherapy has become increasingly important in the practice of clinical psychology, and all clinicians need to know and understand drug actions and reactions. The growing movement for prescribing privileges for appropriately trained clinical psychologists is a reflection of this trend. We begin in this course with the principles of pharmacology, which consist of pharmacokinetics (the absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination of drugs) and pharmacodynamics (drug-receptor interactions). After study of the principles of pharmacology, the class will review individual classes of drugs, including antidepressants, antipsychotics, anti-anxiety agents, drugs for the treatment of movement disorders, and drugs for the treatment of cognitive disorders in the elderly. For each drug class, the basic biology of the disorder and the mechanisms of drug action are discussed, followed by a review of current clinical practice and potential new drugs. Other topics in the drug literature are addressed, including the use of medication with different age groups, sources of drug information, the FDA drug review process, drug-drug interactions, and pharmacoepidemiology.

Section A: Douglas Hoffman
Time: Mondays, 4:30 – 7:00 pm

Maximum: 12
Credits: 3


PYC 706
Advanced Seminar: Cognitive-Behavior Therapy

Competency Area: Clinical Techniques and Methods/Intervention
Restricted to Year III and Year IV students.
Priority to Year IV students.

Up to two Special Student seats available, by written permission of the Director of Student Affairs, if space is available.

This course begins with an overview of conceptual foundations underlying behavioral and cognitive approaches to assessment and treatment. We will proceed to examine several techniques associated with the Cognitive-Behavioral spectrum, including schema analysis and other cognitive formulations, cognitive restructuring, and (toward the more behavioral end of the spectrum), functional analysis, exposure treatment, and contingency management. Students will be introduced to CBT protocols for treatment of depression, various anxiety disorders, and personality disorders. Throughout, we will attend to the conceptualization and role of the therapeutic relationship in CBT. Finally, we will explore some more recent developments that have begun to stretch the boundaries of CBT, to target relational and spiritual themes.

Section A: George Tremblay
Time: Mondays, 4:30 – 7:00 pm
Maximum: 12
Credits: 3


PYC 712
Advanced Seminar: Contemporary Psychoanalytic Practice

Competency Area: Intervention
Restricted to Year IV students.

This applied seminar explores the diversity of experiences and professional opportunities available for the psychoanalytic practitioner. Clinical, personal, social, and organizational events will be discussed from a comparative framework that reflects the ferment and vitality of current theories and practices within psychoanalysis. The emphasis will be on the conceptualization and communication of psychoanalytically informed knowledge and process in a wide variety of practice situations (e.g., evaluation, administration and management, leadership development, supervision, consultation, education, research, and treatment). The goal is to develop and enhance the necessary skills for becoming an effective local clinical psychoanalyst.

Section A: Ted Ellenhorn
Time: Mondays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 12
Credits: 3


PYI 704
Advanced Seminar: Integrative Psychotherapy

Competency Area: Intervention

Restricted to Year III and Year IV students.
Priority to Year IV students.

This is a skills-based seminar where students learn to combine different theoretical orientations and therapy techniques to provide maximally effective help. While based on theoretical and research literature, the focus is on the development of therapy integration skills. Integrative techniques will be drawn from the cognitive-behavioral, psychodynamic, psychophysiological, and spiritual conceptualizations of emotional recovery. Clinical areas to be covered include depression, anxiety, trauma, eating disorders, and borderline personality disorder.

Section A: Mark Lange
Time: Mondays, 4:30 – 7:00 pm
Maximum: 12
Credits: 3


PY 821
Advanced Seminar: Intervention with Children and Adolescents

Competency Area: Intervention
Restricted to Year IV students.

This course integrates theory and practice of interventions for child and adolescent problems. A variety of theoretical models, empirically supported treatments, and treatment modalities are presented. Students learn specific techniques to enhance communication with children and adolescents, so that they can successfully apply a variety of interventions in their work. The need to work cooperatively with parents, schools, and pediatricians is addressed. By the end of this course, students will be able to design and implement treatment programs for children and adolescents that are consistent with their assessment data and case conceptualization.

Section A: Kathi Borden
Time: Mondays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 12
Credits: 3


PY 737A

Advanced Seminar: Object Relations Theory
Competency Area: Intervention
Restricted to Years III and IV students.
Priority to Year IV students.

This seminar provides an overview of the theoretical foundation and critical concepts of object relations theory. It is designed to give the student a significant grasp of personality structure, dynamics and development within an object relational framework. The seminar is intended to provide students with a lens through which they can consider case conceptualization and treatment issues applicable to various clinical problems, settings, and populations. It offers students a personal opportunity to bring dimension and understanding to their clinical work as they explore, in depth, the application of Object Relations theory to clinical practice.

Section A: Colborn Smith

Time: Mondays, 4:30 – 7:00 pm
Maximum: 12
Credits: 3


PY 884A
Case Conference I
PY 893

Practicum
Required of and Restricted to Year III students.
Competency Area: Relationship & Intervention

During this year students will have an intensive small group supervisory experience with faculty. Emphasis is on case presentations, including video and audio tapes, with a goal of examining students’ clinical work.

Section A: Barbara Belcher-Timme
Section B: David Junno

Section C: James Fauth
Section D: Michael Foot
Section E: Martha B. Straus
(Section assignments will be made by the department)
Time: Mondays: 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 5 per section
Credits: 3 and 3


PY 886A
Case Conference III

Competency Area: Relationship & Intervention
Restricted to Year IV students.

This course offers students a further intensive small group clinical experience for fourth year students. Emphasis is on case presentations, including audio and/or videotapes, with a goal of examining students’ clinical work. This course may be taken in place of an Advanced Seminar.

Section A: Lorraine Mangione
Time: Mondays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 12
Credits: 3


PY 720
Cognitive Aspects of Behavior

Competency Area: Intervention
Required of and Restricted to Year II students.

This course examines current cognitive, social cognitive, and cognitive constructivist/constructionist theories both with regard to their particular implications and as metatheories. Topics in cognitive psychology include history of the cognitive position; social cognition; cognitive science and its application to the clinical enterprise; the mainstream cognitive positions; cognitivism and constructionism; development; memory; emotion; dynamic psychology and cognition; cognitive self processes, and constructionist views of diversity. (This course is not a course on cognitive therapy.)

Section A: Roger Peterson
Time: Mondays, 4:30 – 7:00 pm
Maximum: 27
Credits: 3


PY 812A
Consultation: Theory and Practice I

Competency Area: Consultation & Education
Required of and Restricted to Year III students.

This course examines the role of psychologists as consultants in mental health settings and in the community. A variety of consulting experience is explored including case consultation, participation in interdisciplinary teams, and the psychologist as expert in dealing with diverse individuals, groups, and organizations. The course examines issues of contacting, data gathering, diagnosis, intervention, evaluation, and follow-up. Implications of the consultant’s role in education, training, and organizational development are addressed. Participants have the opportunity to apply consultation skills in experiential exercises and also examine the possible consultancy aspect of their practicum role.

Section A: Ted Ellenhorn
Time: Saturday & Sunday, October 8 & 9
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 22
Credits: 1


PYR 875
Doctoral Research Seminar I

Competency Area: Research & Inquiry
Required of and Restricted to Year III students.

The aim of this two-year long sequence is to facilitate students’ development and completion of a doctoral dissertation. During this first semester the emphasis is on helping each student to select a topic which touches upon a theme or area of genuine interest or concern, and to design a realistic dissertation proposal using appropriate methodology. The instructor for each section will also serve as the Chair of the Dissertation Committee for members of the section.

Section A: Kathi Borden
Section B: Ted Ellenhorn
Section C: James Fauth
Section D: Susan Hawes
Section E: Vic Pantesco
Section F: Roger Peterson
Section G: Gargi Roysircar
Section H: Colborn Smith
Section I: Marti Straus

Section J: George Tremblay
(Section assignments will be made by the department)
Time: Mondays, 1:00 – 3:30 pm (5 weeks: October 3, 24 & 31; November 28; December 5)
Maximum: 5 per section
Credits: 1


PYR 877

Doctoral Research Seminar III
Competency Area: Research & Inquiry
Required of and Restricted to Year IV students.

This course represents a continuation and intensification of the dissertation process begun in the third year with Doctoral Research Seminars I and II.

Section A: Kathi Borden
Section B: Ted Ellenhorn

Section C: James Fauth
Section D: Susan Hawes
Section E: Vic Pantesco
Section F: Roger Peterson
Section G: Gargi Roysircar
Section H: Colborn Smith
Section I: Marti Straus
Section J: George Tremblay
(Section assignments will be made by the department)

Time: Mondays, 1:00 – 3:30 pm (10 weeks: September 12, 19 & 26; October 10 &17; November 7, 14 & 21; December 12 & 19)
Maximum: 5 per section
Credits: 2


PY 721A

Ericksonian Hypnotherapy
Competency Area: Intervention

Incorporation of Ericksonian-style hypnosis in the process of psychotherapy is featured throughout the weekend of instruction, demonstration, and practice. Special emphasis will be placed on utilization of ego-states resources in effecting trauma depotentiation and reframing.

Section A: Peter Baldwin
Time: Saturday & Sunday, November 19 & 20
9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Maximum: 20
Credits: 1


PY 859B
Fundamental Clinical Skills I

Competency Area: Relationship
Required of and Restricted to Year I students.

This course addresses the processes and skills required to establish and maintain a helping relationship. It emphasizes basic skills of listening and attending, focusing and probing, confrontation, and working with difficult clinical issues. It involves practice in interviewing and observing in various clinical issues.

Section A: David Arbeitman
Time: Saturday & Sunday, November 5 & 6
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Section B: David Arbeitman
Time: Saturday & Sunday, November 19 & 20
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Section B changed 10/18/05 to: Saturday & Sunday, October 22 & 23
9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Maximum: 15 per section
Credits: 1


PY 896 (Year IV students)
PY 897 (Year V+ students)
Internship

Restricted to Clinical Psychology students.

Prior to graduation, each student must successfully complete an approved internship of 2,000 hours within 24 calendar months which meets the guidelines published by the Association of Psychology and Postdoctoral Internship Centers (APPIC) as well as the Council for the National Register of Health Service Providers in Psychology. Internship may be pursued in several formats: half-time during the fourth and fifth years; full time during the fifth year, etc. Fourth Year students should register for PY 896, Internship and Fifth Year + students should register for PY 897, Internship.

Section A: Colborn Smith
Credits: uncredited


PY 799
Management

Competency Area: Management & Supervision
Required of and Restricted to Year IV students.

This course is a brief conceptual introduction to issues of work organizations and management. Students are exposed to various models of how organizations function, management, leadership, change, change agents, action research, work teams, and productivity. Part of the learning involves envisioning improved structures and relationships within the many workplace settings of psychologists.

Section A: Lorraine Mangione

Time: Mondays, 1:00 – 3:30 pm
(5 weeks: October 3, 24 & 31;
November 28; December 5)
Maximum: 26
Credits: 1


PY 815C

Methods of Psychological Assessment I
Competency Area: Assessment
Required of and Restricted to Year I students.

This year-long sequence provides an introduction to the psychological assessment of individuals with a major focus on the role of psychological tests in personality assessment, but with attention also paid to psychoeducational and neuropsychological assessment. Students develop beginning competence in the administration, scoring, and interpretation of a standard battery of psychodiagnostic techniques. WAIS-III/WISC-IV/WPPSI-III, Bender Gestalt test, MMPI-2).

Section A: Emily A. DeFrance
Section B: William R. Slammon
(Section assignments will be made by the department)

Time: Mondays, 4:30 – 7:00 pm
Maximum: 15 per section
Credits: 3


PYC 726
Positive Psychology: Research & Practice

Competency Area: Intervention
Priority to Year IV students.

In the emerging field of positive psychology the focus is shifting from what is wrong with people to what is right. Helping people identify and use their strengths can help relieve suffering and improve everyday functioning. Through a combination of lecture and hands on positive psychology exercises participants will learn: the role of positive feelings, assessment of positive experiences, the latest research on happiness and life satisfaction, how to identify and use psychological strengths, the three paths to happiness, the powerful effects of optimism and how to develop it, and the role of positive psychology in health, families and work. In addition we will look at some of the exciting opportunities for research in positive psychology.

Section A: David Junno
Time: Saturday & Sunday, September 24 & 25
9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Maximum: 20
Credits: 1


PY 880B
Professional Seminar I: Roles of Psychologists and Ethical Issues

Competency Area: Relationship & Intervention
Required of and Restricted to Year I students.

This first year of a two year sequence has as an important function helping students in joining the profession and becoming psychology graduate students at Antioch University New England. The focus of the first semester is on the many roles of psychologists; for the second semester it is on ethical and legal issues in the practice of psychology.

Section A: David Arbeitman
Section B: Mick Foot
Section C: Bill Halikias
Section D: Emily A. DeFrance
(Section assignments will be made by the department)

Time: Mondays, 1:00 – 3:30 pm
Maximum: 8 per section
Credits: 3


PY 882B
Professional Seminar III:
Case Conceptualization and Demonstrations

PY 892
Practicum
Competency Area: Relationship & Intervention
Required of and Restricted to Year II students.

The year-long Professional Seminar continues to provide the setting for pursuing a number of related objectives, serving as a forum for examination of the students’ professional work and training. During this second year there is an emphasis on case conceptualization and on writing up case formulations. Students read about several different theoretical models and applications. There is a focus on student presentations and discussions.

Section A: Barbara Belcher-Timme

Section B: Elaine Campbell
Section C: William R. Slammon
Section D: David Junno
(Section assignments will be made by the department)
Time: Mondays, 1:00 – 3:30 pm
Maximum: 8 per section
Credits: 3 and 3


PY 731
Psychopathology and Behavioral Disorders

Competency Area: Intervention
Required of and Restricted to Year I students.

This course emphasizes an integrated biopsychosociocultural model in understanding the etiology of psychopathology. After critiquing the assumptions and biases inherent in DSM-IV, it focuses on the diagnostic criteria for the most prevalent psychiatric disorders of adulthood and childhood, including: thought, mood, anxiety, substance abuse, memory, dissociative, eating, adjustment, personality, and sexual disorders. Through the use of clinical vignettes, students will further develop their capacity for making reliable differential diagnoses. In order to encompass a diversity of viewpoints, psychopathology is presented from biological, cognitive-behavioral, feminist, and psychodynamic perspectives.

Section A: David Arbeitman

Time: Mondays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 28
Credits: 3


PYC 700
Psychotherapeutic Intervention I: Individual and Family

Competency Area: Intervention

Required of and Restricted to Year I students.

This is the first part of a year-long course in psychotherapeutic intervention in both theory and practice with individual adults, families, and children. The goal is to develop a flexible, integrated style of conducting treatment, focusing on brief to mid-range treatments. Emphasis is on psychodynamic, cognitive, and systemic thinking. Selected clinical practice and process issues are considered across a variety of psychological disorders, including the therapist’s role, factors in change, diversity, gender effects, empirically supported therapies, and intervention duration and flexibility. Methods comprise readings, discussions, student and instructor presentations, sharing of relevant personal and professional experience, and skill practice.

Section A: Elaine Campbell
Section B: Martha B. Straus
(Section assignments will be made by the department)
Time: Tuesdays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 15 per section

Credits: 3


PY 871
Research Methods and Statistics I

Competency Area: Research & Evaluation
Required of and Restricted to Year II students.

The Research Methods sequence surveys both qualitative and quantitative research strategies in psychology. Topics include philosophy of science, critical thinking, ethical and diversity considerations in research, basic descriptive and inferential (primarily univariate) statistics, evaluating psychosocial interventions, and the use of computers for data management and analysis. The goal of the course is to help students develop the interest and skills to undertake systematic inquiry in applied or theoretical domains. Completion of an introductory research course at the undergraduate level is assumed, though not required.

Section A: Susan Hawes
Time: Mondays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 27
Credits: 3


PY 894C
Special Proficiency Practicum

Restricted to Year IV students.

This is a specialized Practicum for students wishing to have further clinical training experience with a specific focus for a minimum of 80 hours per semester (Summer) and 100 hours per semester (Fall and Spring).

Section A: Lorraine Mangione
Credits: 1


PY 867
Supervised Experience in the Teaching of Clinical Psychology

Competency Area: Consultation and Education
Restricted to Year II, III and IV students.
Priority to Year III and IV students.

This course is restricted to Second, Third, and Fourth Year students and involves supervised teaching within the program. Students conduct background research, prepare material to teach, present the material, supervise small group activities, and grade course assignments, all under the supervision of the primary faculty person.

Section A & B: David Arbeitman
Time: Section A: Saturday & Sunday, November 5 & 6
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Time: Section B: Saturday & Sunday, November 19 & 20
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Section B changed 10/18/05 to: Saturday & Sunday, October 22 & 23
9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Maximum: 5 per section
Credits: 1


PY 890
SIS: Supervised Independent Study
PY 890C

SIS: Dissertation Research

The SIS is for students who wish to have a directed learning experience focused on a specific project or area of interest.

Applied Experience SIS Topics:

Often students in Year III & Year IV, who wish to have a directed learning experience of a practical nature focused on a specific project, elect an SIS in an Applied Experience in Clinical Psychology. These Applied Experiences SIS are organized according to the NCSPP competency areas and are designed to more clearly reflect applied experience for transcript, licensure, and internship application information. Please be certain to include the title and competency areas on SIS contract; course numbers will be assigned by the Registrar’s Office.

PYE 890A
SIS: Applied Experience in Relationship Skills
PYE 890B
SIS: Applied Experience in Assessment
PYE 890C
SIS: Applied Experience in Intervention
PYE 890D
SIS: Applied Experience in Research & Evaluation

PYE 890E
SIS: Applied Experience in Consultation & Education
PYE 890F
SIS: Applied Experience in Management & Supervision

Advanced Supervised Study:

The SIS list of Advanced Supervised Study is for Year III and Year IV students who wish to have a directed learning experience in the core knowledge bases of psychology. These Advanced Supervised Study SIS are organized according to the NCSPP educational model requirements and are designed to more clearly reflect advanced study for transcript, licensure, and internship application information.

PYB 890
Adv SIS: Biological Bases of Behavior
PY 890A
Adv SIS: Cognitive-Affective Bases of Behavior
PY 890R
Adv SIS: Dysfunctional Behavior and Psychopathology

PY 890M
Adv SIS: Historical & Philosophical Context of Psychology
PYS 890
Adv SIS: Social Bases of Behavior
PY 890
Adv SIS: Cultural Bases of Behavior
PY 890
Adv SIS: Life-span Development

PY 890
Adv SIS: Professional Ethics & Standards
PY 890
Adv SIS: Psychological Measurement
PY 890
Adv SIS: Theories of Individual & Systems Functioning/Change

If you are planning an independent study, please register for a SIS on your registration form. However, an SIS contract must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office by December 1, 2005 in order for it to appear on your schedule or transcript. Please be sure to specify on the contract if the SIS will be used to fulfill a competency area or serve as a required course substitute, or as an elective. Contracts received after the December 1st deadline will be returned to you for registration in a subsequent semester (additional costs may apply). Credits will not appear on your schedule until the SIS contract(s) has been submitted to the Registrar’s Office, thus affecting your enrollment status and perhaps your financial aid eligibility.

Credits: Variable


PYS 723
Supervision

Competency Area: Management and Supervision

Required of and Restricted to Year III students.

This course is designed to give students an introduction to supervision that is both didactic and experiential. The course begins with an overview of supervision, including such topics as the purpose and goals of supervision, theoretical models of supervision, roles in supervision, the development of the supervisor and the supervisee, the context of supervision, the evaluative process, the supervisory relationship, issues of diversity in supervision, ethics and supervisory practice, and research on supervision. After exploration and discussion of these areas, students have an opportunity to observe faculty and field supervisors demonstrate supervision in the classroom, as well as practice the role of supervisor in small groups with their peers.

Section A: Lorraine Mangione
Time: Mondays, 1:00 – 3:30 pm
(10 weeks: September 12, 19 & 26; October 10 &17; November 7, 14 & 21; December 12 & 19)

Maximum: 22
Credits: 2


PY 870
Tests and Measurements in Psychology

Competency Area: Assessment
Required of and Restricted to Year I students.

This course is an introductory survey of tests and measurements whose purpose is twofold. First, it provides the academic background for clinically oriented coursework in psychological testing. The psychometrics of tests and controversies around testing are discussed. Students learn to evaluate tests critically, and to select and implement an assessment battery. These topics make up approximately two-thirds of the course. Second, measurement knowledge provides a basis for students to apply themselves to a beginning level of understanding and application of the MMPI-2. Work on the MMPI-2 comprises the remaining one-third of the course.

Section A: Gargi Roysircar
Time: Tuesdays, 1:00 – 3:30 pm
Maximum: 32
Credits: 3


PY 863
Writing Workshop

Competency Area: Elective
Prerequisite: Students must submit a writing sample.

This course helps students develop technical writing skills appropriate for doctoral level psychologists. We begin with an overview of basic writing skills, and then focus on more advanced skills such as integrating professional literature; writing logical, well-organized papers; and developing successful writing habits. The course also covers APA writing standards for professional reports, papers, dissertations, and general publications. Hands-on exercises help students immediately apply new skills. This course can be repeated for credit.

Section A: Greg Blair
Time: Saturday & Sunday, November 5 & 6
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Added 10/18/05: Section B: Greg Blair
Time: Saturday & Sunday, November 12 & 13
9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Maximum: 8
Credits: 1


PY 868
Writing Workshop II

CLASS CANCELLED 10/18/05
Competency Area: Elective
Prerequisite: Completion of Writing Workshop

This course will start where the first Writing Workshop left off. The student shall have the opportunity to learn more detailed information in each of the areas covered by the first Workshop, as well as be introduced to basic concepts of critical analysis. Course content will include a quick review of basic writing components (grammar, punctuation, structure, outlining, and APA style) covered in the first course. The instructor will then provide new information and concepts about each component, as well as an introduction to critical analysis (inductive and deductive reasoning, ambiguity and vagueness, testing the validity of an argument, etc.). In addition, the student will learn how to conceptualize, organize, and write his or her dissertation.

Section A: Greg Blair

Time: Saturday & Sunday, October 1 & 2
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 6
Credits: 1