Environmental Studies Courses Summer 2004

Master’s Programs
Doctoral Program (Ph.D)


Master’s Programs


ESF 525
Alpine Flora

Course Cancelled (05/17/04)
Competency Areas FL03: Natural Communities
Competency Areas SP03 and earlier: EAO, CB, EE, Cert & IND – Field Biology and Ecology Elective; RMA – Elective
First priority to ES students; second priority to Science Education students.

Please Note: Attendance at ALL pre-trip meetings is mandatory. Enrolled students who fail to drop the course at least 1 week before the first pre-trip meeting or who fail to attend the first pre-trip meeting will be held financially responsible for the cost of the trip and will forfeit their seat in the class. Students on the waitlist are strongly encouraged to attend the first class.

This course focuses on the flora of the alpine zone, specifically that of the Presidential Range of New Hampshire. Students will explore plant adaptations along two environmental gradients above timberline, and learn to recognize eight different alpine plant communities. Species distribution and dominance will be assessed through plot work; the effect of anthropogenic disturbance will be reviewed as well. Two pre-trip classes will introduce us to the concepts studied on the slopes of Mt. Adams and Mt. Madison. Total cost to participants is $90.00 (includes camping, food & transportation). Note: This trip involves a fairly strenuous backpack up to our cabin at tree line. Students should be in good physical shape.

Sections A & B: Dick Fortin
Time: Section A: Pre-trip meetings,
Thursdays, June 17, 6:30 – 9:00 pm and
July 8, 3:00 – 5:30 pm, and
Sunday – Friday, July 18 – 23 (Study Trip)
Section B: Pre-trip meetings,
Thursdays, June 17 and July 8,
6:30 – 9:00 pm, and
Sunday – Wednesday, August 1 – 6 (Study Trip)
Maximum: 9 per section
Credits: 2


ESS 564
Biological Concepts

Competency Areas: Cert – Required; CB, EE, EAO, RMA & IND – Elective
Required of and Priority to ES Teacher Certification students.
Prerequisite: Introductory Biology

This course is designed for students who have already taken introductory biology as undergraduates. It is meant to review in greater depth basic concepts of molecular and cellular biology and will be particularly useful for students seeking certification in biology. Topics to be covered include: biochemistry, cellular structure, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, mitosis and meiosis, classical genetics, molecular genetics, protein synthesis and genic control.

Section A: Eric Rhomberg
Time: Thursdays, June 10 – July 15,
1:30 – 5:45 pm
Maximum: 14
Credits: 2


ESP 557
Community Planning Techniques

Competency Areas FL03: Elective
Competency Areas SP03 and earlier:

CB, EE, EAO, Cert, IND – Elective; RMA – Policy Elective

This course explores the practice of planning from a community perspective. With an emphasis on building sustainable communities, techniques for community visioning, goal setting, master planning, and using regulations to guide development will be examined in detail. Students will explore characteristics of community sustainability and approaches for creating more livable community environments. A variety of readings, case studies and class exercises will be assigned as well as project presentations.

Section A: Pete Throop
Time: Thursdays, June 10 – July 22, and
TBA class,6:00 – 9:30 pm
Maximum: 16
(1 seat reserved for Science Ed student)
Credits: 2


ESF 553
Conservation Biology for Non-majors:
Practical Conservation Biology for the Educator and Administrator

Competency Areas FL03: Natural Communities
Competency Areas SP03 and earlier: EAO, CB, EE, Cert & IND – Field Biology and Ecology Elective; RMA – Elective
Priority to non-majors.
Please Note: Attendance at ALL pre-trip meetings is mandatory. Enrolled students who fail to drop the course at least 2 weeks before the first pre-trip meeting or who fail to attend the first pre-trip meeting will be held financially responsible for the cost of the trip and will forfeit their seat in the class. Students on the waitlist are strongly encouraged to attend the first class.

Environmental administrators and educators must understand the biological aspects of pressing issues in conservation in order to address them and communicate their importance to the general public. This 5-day field study trip to the island of Martha’s Vineyard will focus on the practical side of conservation biology, and will be taught by a Vineyard resident and conservation biologist. We will use a balanced mix of lectures, discussions, and field activities to explore key concepts in conservation biology such as: Biodiversity, Habitat Fragmentation and Corridors, Endangered Species protection and recovery, Population Dynamics, and Restoration ecology. Field activities will focus on issues facing beach-nesting birds, fresh and saltwater ponds, and protection and restoration of sandplain grassland and heathland habitats.
Cost for trip approximately $250 (includes ferry, transportation, accommodations & food).

Section A: Luanne Johnson
Times: Pre-trip meeting Wednesday, May 5,
6:30 – 9:00 pm, and
Saturday – Wednesday, study trip, June 5 – 9.
Location: Martha’s Vineyard
Maximum: 14
Credits: 2


ESS 555
Ecology and Adaptation of Small Mammals

Competency Areas FL03: Elective
Competency Areas SP03 and earlier:

CB – Required Alternate; EE, EAO, Cert, IND & RMA – Elective
Priority to Conservation Biology majors.

This course will discuss identification, natural history, behavior, physiology, and ecology of small mammals. Adaptations enhancing survivorship of non-hibernating small mammals in northern environments will be emphasized. Students will employ live-trapping-mark-recapture methods, fluorescent pigment tracing and radiotelemetry to monitor activity and habitat selection of small mammals residing in southern New Hampshire. A field research project will be conducted by each student. Course Fee – $35.00.

Section A: Joseph Merritt
Time: Saturday – Wednesday, June 5 – 9,
9:00 am – 4:30 pm
Location: Harris Center
Maximum: 16
(1 seat reserved for Science Ed student)
Credits: 2


ESE 541
Environmental Education Methods: Developing Sense of Place

Competency Areas: EE – Methods Required Alternate; CB, EAO, Cert, IND & RMA- Elective
Priority to Environmental Education students.

Place-based education and sense of place are catch phrases in, and the foundation for, much current environmental education. What do these phrases mean? Is sense of place nurtured and learned or is it intrinsic, somehow derived from innate potential, a fundamental part of what it means to be human? How can we, as environmental educators, help our students develop sense of place, and what relationships may there be between placed-based education, sense of place, and community? Given that the average person in the U.S. will move at least twelve times in his/her life (U.S. Census Bureau), how can we help children (and adults) develop sense of place which may be sustained and revitalized throughout their lives? How do we do this in the face of 21st century globalization and homogenization of cultures? We will consider these questions as we explore the value and challenges of place-based education, using Keene and it environs as our place of study. You will be asked to reflect on your own sense of place in coming to terms with what is possible in formal and informal educational settings with regard to helping students develop sense of place. The culmination of your work will be the creation of curriculum that integrates course concepts with your personal goals as an environmental educator. Four classes in this course will be at places other than Antioch, all within walking or half-hour driving distance of AUNE.

Section A: Sue Gentile
Time: Thursdays, June 10 – July 15,
1:30 – 5:45 pm
Maximum: 16
(1 seat reserved for Science Ed student)
Credits: 2


ESE 523A
Environmental Education Methods: Teaching in the Outdoors

Competency Areas: EE – Methods Required Alternate; CB, EAO, Cert, IND & RMA- Elective
Priority to Environmental Education students.

A large majority of environmental education takes place outside the school arena. A traditional setting for environmental education includes outdoor, adventure, and wilderness education. This course will provide opportunities to learn and practice techniques for teaching in a variety of outdoor contexts. Special emphasis will be placed on combining adventure education and environmental education in the design of integrated experiences.

Section A: Brad Daniel
Time : Saturday – Wednesday, July 10 – 14 ,
9:00 am-2:00 pm.
** Monday, July 12 only, the class will meet from
5:00 -10:30 pm for an organized night hike.
Maximum: 16
(1 seat reserved for Science Ed student)
Credits: 2


ESF 552
Entomology for Educators

Competency Areas FL03: Natural Communities
Competency Areas SP03 and earlier: EAO, CB, EE, Cert & IND – Field Biology and Ecology Elective; RMA – Elective

Insects and their close allies in the phylum Arthropoda comprise more than 75 percent of the Earth’s biological diversity. Despite their global predominance, insects remain an underutilized, yet ideal, interdisciplinary teaching strategy for educators. In this course, students will learn to use insects as a paradigm for teaching biological and ecological concepts in the classroom, laboratory, and field. Topics include insect taxonomy and identification, evolutionary adaptations and behaviors, and ecology and conservation. Students will develop techniques for keeping and rearing insects and create plans for using insects as a hands-on living laboratory. A significant portion of class time will be devoted to inquiry-based learning in the field and laboratory.

Section A: Brian Hagenbuch
Time: Thursdays, June 10, 6:30 – 10:30 pm, and
June 17 – July 15, 8:00 am – 12:15 pm
Maximum: 16
(1 seat reserved for Science Ed student)
Credits: 2


ESS 558
Forest Ecosystem Analysis

Competency Areas: CB – Required Alternate; EAO, EE, Cert, IND & RMA – Elective
Priority to Conservation Biology majors.
Prerequisites: Natural Resource Inventory and New England Flora or written permission of instructor attached to or on registration form.
Please Note: Attendance at ALL pre-trip meetings is mandatory. Enrolled students who fail to drop the course at least 1 week before the first pre-trip meeting or who fail to attend the first pre-trip meeting will be held financially responsible for the cost of the trip and will forfeit their seat in the class. Students on the waitlist are strongly encouraged to attend the first class.

The objectives of this course are for students to become familiar with the methodology, benefits, and challenges of conducting ecosystem-level studies. On Mt. Moosilauke and at Hubbard Brook in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, students will become familiar with the ecology of spruce-fir and northern hardwood forests through experiential learning comprised of field observations, field research and data analysis. Students will focus on field and analytical methods used to quantify species composition, structure, history, and the nutrient status of forested ecosystems. Techniques will include plot sampling, dendrochronology, and the development of nutrient budgets. Course fee: $150 for food and lodging.

Section A: Peter Palmiotto
Time: (pre-trip meeting) Friday, June 18,
6:30 – 9:00 pm and
Saturday – Wednesday, June 26 – 30,
8:00 am – 10:00 pm (study trip)
Maximum: 15
Credits: 2


ESS 538
Freshwater Invertebrate Ecology

Competency Areas FL03: RMA – Required Alternate; EAO, CB, EE, Cert, IND – Elective
Priority to RMA & CB.students who have written permission from their Program Directors attached to or on registration form.

This course will examine the ecological roles and relationships of freshwater invertebrates of streams, rivers, ponds and wetlands (including vernal pools). Emphasis will be placed on studying the sampling, identification, behavior and diversity of freshwater macroinvertebrates in the variety of aquatic ecosystems of New England. This course introduces students to invertebrate taxonomy and identification with practical experience – skills will be highly applicable to biomonitoring and natural history education, as well as fly-fishing! Both field and lab work will be part of each class session.

Section A: Maria Aliberti
Time: Fridays, June 11 – July 16,
1:30 – 5:45 pm
Maximum: 14
(1 seat reserved for Science Ed student)
Credits: 2


ESF 536
Galapagos to the Andes

Competency Areas SP03 and earlier: EAO, CB, EE, IND & Cert-Field Biology & Ecology Elective. RMA – Elective.
Competency Areas FL03: Natural Communities:
Registration Instructions: Students who registered for this course for 0 credits in the Spring, MUST register for it again in the summer for 3 credits.
Please Note: Attendance at ALL pre-trip meetings is mandatory. Enrolled students who fail to drop the course at least 1 week before the first pre-trip meeting or who fail to attend the first pre-trip meeting will be held financially responsible for the cost of the trip and will forfeit their seat in the class. Students on the waitlist are strongly encouraged to attend the first class.
*Also Note: The pre-trip meetings for this course occurred in the spring; the field study trip occurs during the summer term. Spring enrollment is uncredited; the field study trip will earn 3 credits in the summer term. Students must register for both spring and summer terms and go on the trip to earn credits. By registering for and being admitted to the non-credited Spring class, students agreed to register for summer and assume responsibility for field trip costs.

This course will focus on the relationship between evolutionary ecology and island biogeography in the most biologically intact ocean archipelago in the world. The abundant, unique fauna on these islands was inspirational to the development of Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection and today remains an important testing ground for evolutionary research and a mecca for students of biology. We will visit many of the major islands, and snorkel with sea lions and penguins. Participants will also spend several days in the Amazon rain forest after visiting the islands. Total cost including *air fare, meals, and lodging will be approximately $5800 (*price may vary depending on airfare; $2250 charged to Spring 2004; $3550 charged to Summer 2004)

Section A: Jon Atwood
Times: (Pre-trip meeting dates)
Wednesdays, March 10, 31, April 21 and May 5,
7:00 – 9:00 pm and
(Study Trip) Wednesday – Monday, July 14 – August 2
Location: Keene (Pre-trip meetings) and
Galapagos Archipelago and Amazon basin (Study Trip)
Maximum: 14
Credits: 3


ESP 586
Groundwater Protection Policy

Competency Areas: RMA – Required Alternate; EAO, CB, EE, Cert, IND – Elective
Prerequisite: Hydrology
Priority to RMA students.
Note: Deadline for adding this class is June 10.

Ground water is a vital economic resource throughout the United States. It is particularly important for drinking water supply in many homes and communities in New England. There are many different national, state, and local land use policies to protect groundwater integrity. Correct water well design and construction codes are also important for ground water protection.

This course includes an overview of groundwater occurrence, groundwater quality issues and contamination threats to aquifers and water wells. Comparisons will be made of the development of groundwater protection policies and awareness programs in various New England towns and communities.

The course will involve field trips in Massachusetts and New Hampshire to demonstrate protection strategies, and will include class sessions in Concord (NH) from consultants and state agency experts.

Section A: Steve Lamb
Time: Fridays, June 11, 18, 25,
8:30 – 11:30 am, and
Saturdays, June 19 & July 10, 8:00 am – 4:00 pm
Location: Antioch and field trips in NH and Mass
Maximum: 16
Credits: 2


ESX 601
Group Dynamics & Leadership I

Competency Areas FL03: RMA – Required Alternate; EE, EAO, CB, Cert & IND – Elective
Competency Areas SP03 and earlier:

EE & RMA – Required Alternate; EAO, CB, Cert & IND – Elective
Note: Deadline for adding this class is June 10

This course will focus on group development, group dynamics, and leadership. The course introduces students to elements of group dynamics and to a model that matches leadership styles to stages of group development. Students work in teams during the course and use course concepts to analyze their experience. Skills emphasized are group leadership and membership skills, group observation and feedback, conflict management, and managing diversity in groups. Students are expected to read The One Minute Manager Builds High Performing Teams by Blanchard, Carew and Parisi-Carew before the first class meeting. Special emphasis will be placed on case studies in the environmental field.

Section A: Steve Guerriero
Time: Saturday, Sunday & Monday, June 19 – 21,
8:30 am – 5:45 pm
Maximum: 18
(4 seats reserved for O&M students,
1 seat reserved for Science Ed student)
Credits: 2


ESP 525
Industrial Ecology

Competency Areas FL03: Elective
Competency Areas SP03 and earlier: RMA- Policy Elective; CB, EAO, EE, Cert & IND -
Priority to SP03 and earlier RMA.
Note: Deadline for adding this class is June 4.

Understanding the flow of material and energy throughout a life cycle can be considered the first step toward gaining an appreciation for ways of intervening that lead one toward identifying opportunities for curtailing waste and pollution at each point throughout the system. In this experiential weekend course we will begin to explore how Industrial Ecology defined as a tool for better understanding the flow of material and energy from raw material extraction, manufacturing, consumer, and post consumer places along a particular life cycle can lead toward greater responsibility with respect to overall resource management and pollution prevention. This course will go into some depth regarding the application of pollution prevention tools within the manufacturing environment and also work at the macro scale utilizing the city of Keene as a class study project toward identifying potential strategies leading toward greater resource utilization following the principals of Industrial Ecology. At the end of the course students will have gained a working vocabulary and appreciation of the practice of pollution prevention nestled within the broader framework of Industrial Ecology.

Section A: Tony Sarkis and Peter Cooke
Times: Saturday & Sunday, June 5 & 6,
9:00 – 4:30 pm
Maximum: 14
Credits: 1


ESP 599
Land Protection and Stewardship

Competency Areas FL03: Elective
Competency Areas SP03 and earlier: CB, EC, EE, Cert & RMA- Policy Elective
Priority to SP03 and earlier RMA.

This course is designed to provide students with an exposure to all aspects of land protection transactions. Emphasis will be placed on providing a context for land protection, developing an understanding of the tools of the trade, tax benefits to the landowner, site assessment, developing and completing the real estate transaction, and stewardship of protected lands

Section A: Pete Throop
Time: Saturday & Sunday, July 10 & 11,
9:00 am – 4:30 pm
Maximum: 16
Credits: 1


ES 699C
Master’s Thesis

Required for all CB students; optional for EAO, EE, Cert, IND, & RMA students.
Prerequisite: Master’s Thesis Seminar and written permission from the thesis advisor attached to or on registration form.
It is recommended that students register for Master’s Thesis in their 5th semester.

As a culmination of a student’s work at Antioch, the Master’s Thesis should reflect the student’s particular focus of study and future professional interest. This effort will include a central research component associated with it. The research can be quantitative, qualitative or literary in nature. All Environmental Studies students are required to have approval from their advisor prior to entering the Master’s Thesis process.

Section A: Jon Atwood
Section B: Peter Palmiotto
Section C: Rachel Thiet
Section D: Jim Jordan
Section E: Beth Kaplin
Section F: Meade Cadot
Maximum: 5 per section
Credits: 3


ES 699D
Master’s Thesis Continuation

Required for all students continuing a Master’s Thesis for which they have previously registered.

Students must register for Master’s Thesis Continuation every semester until the thesis has been completed and signed off by your Master’s Thesis reader. Enrollment in Master’s Thesis continuation confers half-time status for Financial Aid and loan deferment purposes through July 25.

Section A: ES Faculty
Maximum: 20
Credits: uncredited


ESS 562
Natural Resource Inventory: Wildlife

Competency Areas: CB – Required Alternate to NRI Vegetation & Soils; EAO, EE, Cert, IND & RMA – Elective
Priority to Conservation Biology students.

What are the techniques we use to assess wildlife distribution and abundance? What are the components of a well-rounded natural resource inventory? This newly designed NRI course will focus on describing and mapping habitat types, as well as provide an overview of major techniques used in conducting surveys for birds, amphibians, reptiles, mammals and arthropods. The course will review the basics of developing investigation plans, discuss use of GPS and compass, and provide examples of aerial photo interpretation. The course format will combine afternoon lectures followed by morning field work, as well as individual student work outside of formal class meetings.

Section A: Jon Atwood
Time: Thursdays, June 10 – July 8,
1:30 – 4:30 pm and
Fridays, June 11 – July 9, 6:30 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 16
Credits: 3


ESF 527
Non-Flowering Plants

Course Cancelled (05/17/04)
Competency Areas FL03: Natural Communities

Competency Areas SP03 and earlier: CB, EAO, EE, Cert & IND – Field Biology and Ecology Elective; RMA – Elective

Turn back the evolutionary clock and mingle with some of the oldest plant groups on the planet. From lichens and mosses to ferns, clubmosses, and horsetails, we will introduce non-flowering herbaceous natives that survive in our diverse New England habitats. We will focus on an ecological and evolutionary overview of the groups and will develop identification skills through an increased understanding of morphology, in-the-field explorations, and the use of plant identification keys. Course verification will include a student collection of assorted representative species.

Sections A & B: Wink Lees
Time: Section A: Fridays, June 11 – July 16,
8:00 am – 12:15 pm
Section B: Fridays, June 11 – July 16,
1:30 – 5:45 pm
Maximum: 14 per section
(1 seat per section reserved for Science Ed student)
Credits: 2


ES 693

Practicum, General
Competency Area: EAO, CB, EE, Cert, IND & RMA – Required
A total of 8 Practicum credits are REQUIRED for all Environmental Biology/Conservation Biology, Environmental Education and RMA majors. A total of 2 General Practicum credits are REQUIRED for Certification majors. It is strongly RECOMMENDED that students not register for Practicum until after completing their second semester in the program.

The Practicum provides students with an opportunity to apply, in an organizational setting, what they are learning and to develop professional contacts within their fields of interest. While students are responsible for locating practica, faculty is available to provide support and information as needed. All students are required to attend a scheduled PRACTICUM ORIENTATION during their first semester.

Note: Seminars are not required for the summer session; however, one seminar is highly recommended for students for whom this is the first practicum, either on Thursday, June 10 or Friday, June 11. The seminars will be held 11:30 to 12:30, and will take the place of one of the interim reports required in the summer.

Section A: Katherine Delanoy
Section B: Bo Hoppin
Section C: Duncan Watson
Section D: Joy Ackerman
Maximum: 15 per section
Credits: variable


ES 690U
SIS: Special Project

Competency areas: RMA & IND – Required for students not doing a Masters Thesis; EAO, EE & Cert – Optional, Elective

The Special Project will be conducted as a supervised independent study. As a culmination of a student’s work at Antioch, the Special Project is comparable to a master’s thesis in scope, but differs in that it is not focused on research design. The Special Project follows standardized approaches used in a student’s chosen field such as a solid waste plan, a curriculum development plan, or a marketing plan. The Special Project’s content and format must be approved by both the student’s advisor and program chair, but may be supervised by a qualified person external to the department.

Note: RMA Students are required to complete either a Special Project or a Master’s Thesis.

Please register for this SIS on your registration form. However, an SIS contract must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office by July 10, 2004 in order for it to appear on your schedule or transcript. Please be sure to specify on the contract if the SIS will be used to fulfill a competency area or serve as a required course substitute, or as an elective. Contracts received after the July 10 deadline will be returned and registration required in the subsequent semester (additional costs may apply). Credits will not appear on your schedule until the SIS contract(s) has been submitted to the Registrar’s Office, thus affecting your enrollment status and perhaps your financial aid eligibility.

Section A: Michael Simpson
Maximum: 15
Credits: 3


ES 690

SIS: Supervised Individual Study

If you are planning an independent study, please register for an SIS on your registration form. However, an SIS contract must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office by July 10, 2004 in order for it to appear on your schedule or transcript. Please be sure to specify on the contract if the SIS will be used to fulfill a competency area or serve as a required course substitute, or as an elective. Contracts received after the July 10 deadline will be returned and registration required in the subsequent semester (additional costs may apply). Credits will not appear on your schedule until the SIS contract(s) has been submitted to the Registrar’s Office, thus affecting your enrollment status and perhaps your financial aid eligibility.

Credits: variable


ESS 546
Soils: Mapping and Interpretation

(formerly Soils)
Competency Areas: RMA – Required Alternate; CB, EAO, EE, Cert & IND – Elective
Priority to RMA students.

This course focuses on soil-landscape relationships and the applications of soil science to land use and management issues. We will cover soil formation processes, soil taxonomy, and soil classifications of the U.S.D.A., emphasizing mapping conventions and the evolution of soils at parcel to landscape scales. State and federal standards developed for assessing soils will be reviewed in the context of different land uses.

Section A: Francesca Latawiec
Times: Saturdays & Sundays,
June 5 & 6 and June 26 & 27,
9:00 am – 4:30 pm
Maximum: 12
Credits: 2


ESF 541A
Wetlands Ecology

Competency Area FL03 – Natural Communities
Competency areas: CB & RMA – Required Alternate; EAO, EE , IND & Cert – Elective,
Priority to CB & RMA.students who have written permission from their Program Director attached to or on registration form.

Human impacts on wetlands continue to reduce the global area of these precious aquatic ecosystems at an alarming rate. What makes a wetland valuable? What ecological functions do wetlands perform for human and non-human communities? How do we assess wetland functioning from an ecological standpoint? In this course, we will explore the ecological relationships among various components of wetland systems, including vascular plants, the physical and biological properties of hydric soils, and wildlife. Particular emphasis will be on plant and soil relationships, and we will ground our exploration in the relationship between wetland ecosystem structure, biogeochemical cycling, and ecosystem function. Course time will combine lectures, discussions, and field trips. Hip waders are a must!

Section A: Rachel K. Thiet
Time: Thursdays, June 10 – July 15,
8:00 am – 12:15 pm
Maximum: 16 (1 seat reserved for Science Ed student)
Credits: 2


ESF 521
Wetlands Flora

Competency Areas FL03: Natural Communities
Competency Areas SP03 and earlier: EAO, CB, EE, Cert & IND – Field Biology & Ecology Elective; RMA – Elective

This course instructs the student in the identification of plants that serve as wetland indicators – the hydrophytes. Lab and field sessions will utilize local wetlands to learn the classification of wetland types in our area. Dominant indicators of common wetland plant types will be discussed among the approximate 200 species of common woody and non-woody plants that will be covered. Wetlands delineation methodologies will be discussed and practiced in the field utilizing these plants as one of the three standard indicators of a wetland. Students will be required to prepare a plant collection and demonstrate proficiency in field identification of wetlands flora. Boots are essential.

Section A: Lenny Lord
Time: Fridays, June 11 – July 16,
1:30 – 5:45 pm
Maximum: 16
(1 seat reserved for Science Ed student)
Credits: 2


Doctoral Program (Ph.D)


ES 775
Candidacy Continuation

Competency Area: Dissertation Process
Restricted to students who have completed three years of the program, but have not completed their Service Project, Integrated Essay, AND Dissertation Proposal.

The Candidacy Continuation semester is designed for students who need additional time to complete their doctoral candidacy projects. Students retain full access to faculty and all student resources at Antioch. During this semester they continue to work independently with their advisor and the rest of the faculty as needed to complete their service project, integrated essay, doctoral dissertation proposal. Students may schedule their Dissertation Proposal Review meeting during this candidacy continuation semester.

Registration in Candidacy Continuation will carry half-time status for loan deferment and Financial Aid purposes.

Section A: Thomas Webler
Maximum: 5
Credits: uncredited


ES 776
Dissertation Seminar

Competency Area: Dissertation Process
Restricted to PhD IV students.
Prerequisites: Completion of The Integrated Essay, Service Project and Dissertation Proposal

This year-long seminar is designed to provide support and consultation for students in the process of formulating and carrying out their doctoral dissertation research. Topics to be addressed during the year include: ongoing evaluation and assessment of research methods, research ethics, dilemmas of working in the field, analysis, writing the dissertation, making formal presentations, dissemination of research results, and transformations you experience in your growth as a scholar. Students along with the instructors are intended to serve as a peer community, providing support, advice and critique. Each semester, students will make a formal presentation to the class documenting the current state of their research and bringing to the class the expertise they have developed. Additional faculty may be brought in as needed to provide input in special topic areas.

Section A: Beth Kaplin
Times: Wednesday – Saturday,
June 16 – 19, 8:00 am – 12:00 pm and
Friday, June 18, 2:00 – 6:00 pm
Note: Wednesday, June 16 class will begin at 9:00 am.
Additional contact hours will be
met by specific coursework designed
to be completed on-line.
Maximum: 15
Credits: 4


ES 899
Doctoral Dissertation

Competency Area: Dissertation Process
Restricted to PhD IV students.

Students who are actively engaged in writing the doctoral dissertation are required to register for these credits. You cannot register for this class unless your dissertation proposal has been approved by your committee.

Section A: Thomas Webler
Maximum: 15
Credits: 4


ES 899C
Doctoral Dissertation Continuation

Competency Area: Dissertation Process
Restricted to PhD V+ who have registered for three semesters of (ES 776) Dissertation Seminar and two semesters of (ES 899) Doctoral Dissertation, and have not completed the dissertation.

Section A: Doctoral Faculty
Maximum: 15
Credits: uncredited


ES 700
Ecological Thought

Competency Area: Foundation
Restricted to PhD I students.

The course is organized on the premise that there is an emerging ecological worldview that is the foundation of academic environmental studies, professional environmental practice, and the contemporary environmental movement. This worldview transcends the domain of environmentalism per se, and is influential in a range of disciplines, professions and dimensions of public life. This course explores the dynamics of its emergence, by attending to three interconnected conceptual sets: ecology, nature and life (systems thinking, ecological thinking, evolutionary thought), power, place and space (power relations, natural resource transformation, globalization, the commons, paradigms of activism, environmental movements), and meaning, purpose, and identity (ecopsychology and ecospirituality, literary expression, perception and language, story and myth, and ecological identity). Students will have the opportunity to explore the intellectual roots of their own ecological worldview and to assess a specific intellectual direction of interest.

Section A: Mitchell Thomashow
Time: Thursday – Friday, June 17 – 25,
8:00 am – 12:00 pm.
No class Sunday, June 20.
Additional contact hours will be
met by specific coursework designed
to be completed on-line.
Maximum: 15
Credits: 3


ES 707
Introduction to Research Design

Competency Area: Foundation
Restricted to PhD I students.

The purpose of this course is to become familiar with a variety of research paradigms and to study the different lenses that they provide for viewing and understanding the world, and in particular, the physical environment. Within paradigms, you will try out different methodological approaches, such as surveys, in-depth interviews, case studies, and quasi experiments. Through the development of a research proposal, you will ground discussions of theory in the practical concerns of research: framing research questions; designing a study; collecting and analyzing data; dealing with validity, reliability, and ethical issues; and writing a research report.

Section A: Louise Chawla
Time: Wednesday – Saturday, June 16 – 19,
8:00 am – 12:00 pm and
Monday – Thursday, June 21 – 24,
2:00 – 6:00 pm
Note: Wednesday, June 16 class will begin at 9:00 am.
Additional contact hours will be
met by specific coursework designed to
be completed on-line.
Maximum: 15
Credits: 3


ES 726
Learning Domain and Environmental Leadership I

Competency Area: Research Strategies and Learning Domains
Restricted to PhD II students.

A series of lectures and workshops in this course are designed to provide students with the intellectual depth and research tools to define their learning domain. The students will engage in library research to fill out their individual knowledge maps, and the attendant literature on theoretical and applied dimensions of the thought collectives, theories, research applications and controversies associated with the learning domain. Students will discuss their work with leading scholars and writers and learn how others set the framework for and carry out their research. By the end of the course, students will have produced a blueprint to guide their learning through the coming year.

Section A: Alesia Maltz
Time: Wednesday – Saturday, June 16 – 19,
8:00 am – 12:00 pm and
Monday – Thursday, June 21 – 24,
2:00 – 6:00 pm
Note: Wednesday, June 16 class will begin at 9:00 am.
Additional contact hours will be
met by specific course work designed to
be completed on-line.
Maximum: 15
Credits: 3


ES 727
Research Strategy: Theory, Method and Design I

Competency Area: Research Strategies and Learning Domains
Restricted to PhD II students.

The emphasis during this semester of this two-part course is on how to interpret and evaluate positivist research studies. Positive research is by far the dominant paradigm of research in science today. By drawing upon published empirical research, students will learn firsthand how to dissect research studies to identify their shortcomings and strengths. Applications will come from social and natural sciences. Attention will be given to defining variables, designing experiments, and interpreting statistical analyses. Research ethics will be discussed. Students will be expected to write a literature review comparing and evaluating several similar research studies.

Section A: Thomas Webler
Time: Wednesday – Saturday, June 16 – 19,
2:00 – 6:00 pm, and
Monday – Friday, June 21 – 25,
8:00 am – 12:00 pm
Additional contact hours will be
met by specific coursework designed to
be completed on-line.
Maximum: 15
Credits: 3


ES 752
Service Project

Competency Area: Integrated Projects
Restricted to PhD III students.

The Service Project is an intensive practicum project that involves a form of environmental or social service in a community context. The project may occur at any time during the third year of the program. Students should register for Service Project during the semester in which the bulk of the work will be done. For more specific information about the service project, please see the Doctoral Program Guide.

Section A: Heidi Watts
Maximum: 12
Time: To be arranged with instructor
Credits: 4


ES 890

SIS: Supervised Individual Study

If you are planning an independent study, please register for a SIS on your registration form. However, a SIS contract must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office by July 10, 2004 in order for it to appear on your schedule or transcript. Please be sure to specify on the contract if the SIS will be used to fulfill a competency area or serve as a required course substitute, or as an elective. Contracts received after the July 10 deadline will be returned to you for registration in a subsequent semester (additional costs may apply). Credits will not appear on your schedule until the SIS contract(s) has been submitted to the Registrar’s Office, thus affecting your enrollment status and perhaps your financial aid eligibility.

Credits: variable


ES 751
Theory and Practice Seminar I

Competency Area: Integrated Projects
Restricted to PhD III students.

The seminar emphasizes the preparatory work necessary for both the Integrated Essay and the Service Project. For the Integrated Essay, students lay the groundwork for the essay. As preparation for the seminar, students compile a topographic map. This serves two functions. First, it allows for a synthesis of the seminal themes of the learning domain, specifically addressing the key theoretical approaches and directions. Second, it delineates the convergence among those approaches, posing questions for further inquiry. By the end of the session, students will compile an outline, describing the dimensions of the essay.

For the Service Project, students propose and develop their goals and objectives, considering the moral and ethical dimensions of their work. In what ways does the project provide a necessary service? Who serves to benefit from the project? Where does the scholar/practitioner fit? By the end of the session, students will complete a brief proposal, outlining the dimensions of the project. In addition, the seminar poses questions regarding the political and spiritual dimensions of service learning, with selected readings about the philosophy of service.

Section A: Heidi Watts and Mitchell Thomashow
Times: Thursday and Saturday, June 17 & 19,
8:00 am – 12:00 and 2:00 – 6:00 pm and
Monday, Wednesday, Friday, June 21, 23, 25,
8:00 am – 12:00.
Additional contact hours will be
met by specific coursework designed to be
completed on-line.
Maximum: 12
Credits: 3