Clinical Psychology Courses Spring 2004


PY 898
Advanced Practicum

An optional Practicum for Year IV students wishing to have extensive further clinical training for more than 12 hours per week with a minimum of 300 hours per semester.

Section A: Lorraine Mangione
Credits: 3


PY 856A
Advanced Seminar: Aftermath and Treatment of Trauma

Course Cancelled (02/03/04)
Competency Area: Clinical Techniques &
Methods/Interventions
Restricted to Year III & Year IV students.
Priority to Year IV students.
Up to two Special Student seats available, by written permission of the Director of Student Affairs, if the class is not filled by matriculated students.

This seminar addresses the psychological sequelae of traumatic events and their resolution. Recovery will be illustrated using a four-stage model: victimization, aftermath, integration, and full recovery. Both simple and complex post-traumatic stress disorder will be covered, as well as other trauma-induced emotional disorders. Trauma will be examined through a psychohistorical lens, which will include the politics of war and violence.

Section A: Margaret Goodwin
Time: Mondays, 4:30 – 7: 00 pm
Maximum: 12
Credits: 3


PYC 723
Advanced Seminar: Beyond Psychotherapy:
Positive Psychology & The Field of Coaching

Competency Area: Clinical Techniques &
Methods/Interventions
Restricted to Year IV students.

Psychology has a great deal to offer beyond the alleviation of symptoms. Using the research on change, emotional intelligence, and positive psychology, practitioners can help individuals and organizations improve functioning and achieve important goals. In this course students will learn the knowledge and skills necessary to establish a practice outside of the medical field and health insurance reimbursement. The course will consist of two components. Lectures, reading and class presentations will explore the topics of psychological health, emotional competencies, and psychological skills. Readings will look at the work of Daniel Goleman Ph. D., Martin Seligman Ph. D., and others. The other half of the course will focus on the application of this knowledge in the area of coaching through hands on practice. Students will learn how coaching differs from psychotherapy, the fundamental coaching skills, and how to develop and market a coaching practice.

Section A: David Junno
Time: Mondays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 8
Credits: 3


PYB 711
Advanced Seminar: Clinical Neuropsychology

Competency Area: Biological Bases of Behavior
Restricted to Year III & Year IV students.
Priority to Year IV students.
Prerequisite: Methods of Psychological Assessment I and II
Up to two Special Student seats available, by written permission of the Director of Student Affairs, if the class is not filled by matriculated students.

This seminar examines the structure and function of the central nervous system, brain-behavior relationships, and neuropathology. Seminar content focuses on evaluation techniques for diagnosis of brain dysfunction including visual, auditory, memory, and language processes. Application of these techniques to the development of remedial strategies for learning disabilities and adult dysfunctions is addressed.

Section A: Richard Toye
Time: Mondays, 4:30 – 7:00 pm
Maximum: 12
Credits: 3


PYC 706
Advanced Seminar: Cognitive-Behavior Therapy

Competency Area: Clinical Techniques &
Methods/Interventions
Restricted to Year III & Year IV students.
Priority to Year IV students.
Up to two Special Student seats available, by written permission of the Director of Student Affairs, if the class is not filled by matriculated students.

This course examines the conceptual basis and techniques of cognitive (e.g. cognitive restructuring, schema analysis) and behavioral (e.g. exposure therapy, contingency management, skills training) interventions and their applications in the treatment of specific disorders. Specifically, students learn how to deliver cognitive behavioral treatments for a number of the following Axis I disorders: Depression, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Panic Disorder, and PTSD. It also examines cognitive-behavioral treatments for personality disorders, including Dialectical Behavior Therapy and a schema-focused approach. The therapeutic relationship in cognitive-behavioral therapies, including an exploration of the therapeutic alliance, empathy and validation, “transference” and “countertransference”, and issues of “resistance” are also a major focus.

Section A: David Arbeitman
Time: Mondays, 4:30 – 7:00 pm
Maximum: 12
Credits: 3


PYI 705
Advanced Seminar: Forensic Psychology


Competency Area: Effective Interventions
Restricted to Year IV students.
(formerly Professional Practice Seminar)

This seminar focuses on the practice of forensic psychology with an emphasis on the context for a relationship between the law and behavioral sciences. Following a general overview of the legal and court systems, including the history and role of mental health experts in the judiciary, this seminar focuses on six primary ways that clinical psychologists provide services to legal professionals: competency in the clinical process, mental status at the time of the offense, sentencing and rehabilitation, civil commitment and civil competencies, compensation for mental or emotional injuries, children and families, and juvenile justice. With each of these venues, students learn how to appreciate the relevant legal issues and to better communicate important psychological findings to courts and legal professionals.

Section A: William Halikias
Time: Mondays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 8
Credits: 3


PY 719
Advanced Seminar: Health Psychology

Competency Area: Biological Bases of Behavior
Restricted to Year III & Year IV students.
Priority to Year IV students.
Up to two Special Student seats available, by written permission of the Director of Student Affairs, if the class is not filled by matriculated students.

This course provides an overview of the emerging field of clinical health psychology and behavioral medicine. There will be a focus on the delivery of clinical services in an interdisciplinary healthcare setting, with an emphasis on the role of the psychologist as consultant to a variety of medical subspecialties. Topics to be reviewed include the psychophysiology of stress, the stress-illness connection, psychoneuroimmunology, the psychology of pain, treatment adherence, and psychosocial variables in chronic health conditions. In addition, the factors mediating the health-illness continuum are examined, with particular emphasis on the psychology of wellness. Students are introduced to various tools of the trade, including biofeedback, relaxation training, meditation, clinical hypnosis, and psychophysiological psychotherapy.

Section A: Victor Pantesco
Time: Mondays, 4:30 – 7:00 pm
Maximum: 12
Credits: 3


PY 816F
Advanced Seminar:
Psychological Assessment:
Evaluations For Clinics, Schools and Courts

Competency Area: Clinical Techniques &
Methods/Interventions
Restricted to Year III & Year IV students who have completed Methods of Psychological Assessment I and II and have at least one year psychological assessment experience. Basic familiarity with the Wechsler scales and the Rorschach test (Comprehensive System) is MANDATORY.
Priority to Year IV students.
Up to two Special Student seats available, by written permission of the Director of Student Affairs, if the class is not filled by matriculated students.

This course explores the meaning of clinical inference as it relates to the assessment enterprise. Psychological assessment is the development of diagnostic meaning from a person’s history, clinical interviews, observations, records, and psychological tests. The ability to obtain, shape, integrate, and ultimately export meaningful information about an individual is the basis of psychological assessment. Test instruments used to model the idea of test-buttressed opinions combined with other data include the Wechsler scales, Rorschach test (Comprehensive System), and MMPI-2. Other tests are discussed in the context of specific assessment activities. This class explores the assessment enterprise with clinics and for mental health professionals, in schools for learning and emotional difficulties, and for courts around forensic evaluations. With each of these tests and assessment contexts, students learn to better analyze and integrate complex information, applying this data skillfully to various systems.

Section A: William Halikias
Time: Mondays, 4:30 – 7:00 pm
Maximum: 12
Credits: 3


PYI 702
Advanced Seminar: The Psychology of Performance

Competency Area: Effective Interventions
Restricted to Year IV students.
(formerly Professional Practice Seminar)

This seminar focuses on familiarizing the student with the more general field of sport psychology (with a particular emphasis on performance enhancement) and the application of performance enhancement principles to the consultative and therapeutic roles of the clinical psychologist. Students also become familiar with various national organizations offering memberships to those interested in furthering their interest in the field of sport psychology. The class will strive for a “hands-on” approach to the material with guest speakers, live demonstrations, and student-led discussions comprising the method of instruction.

Section A: Jim Graves
Time: Mondays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 8
Credits: 3


PY 885A
Case Conference II
PY 893
Practicum

Required of and Restricted to Year III students.

This is a continuation of Case Conference I. The clinical aspect of the Qualifying Examination takes place in the context of this course. During this semester there is also an opportunity to work on conceptual and personal issues stimulated by the Qualifying Exam.

Section A: Barbara Belcher-Timme
Section B: Kathi Borden
Section C: Mick Foot
Section D: Lorraine Mangione
Section E: Jim Fauth
Section F: Martha B. Straus
(Section assignments will be made by the department)
Time: Mondays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 8 per section
Credits: 3 and 3


PYC 724
Clinical Interpretation of The Rorschach Inkblot Method,
Comprehensive System

Competency Area:
Clinical Techniques & Methods/Interventions

This class explores clinical inference using the Rorschach and Comprehensive System. We will review assessment protocols containing issues of juvenile delinquency, sexual deviancy, psychological trauma, homicide and suicide, and dangerousness. In this pedagogy, the Rorschach gets incrementally combined with history, interviews, records, collateral interviews, and other psychological tests with the goal of contextualizing the Rorschach within the assessment enterprise.

Section A: William Halikias
Time: Saturday & Sunday, April 17 & 18,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 15
Credits: 1


PY 714
Clinical Psychopharmacology

Competency Area: Biological Bases of Behavior
Prerequisite: PY 710 Biological Foundations of Clinical Psychology
Priority to Year IV students.

This weekend course will focus on the clinical uses of psychotropic medications in the treatment of affective disorders, psychotic disorders and anxiety disorders. The mechanisms by which abused substances affect the body and drugs used in the treatment of substance abuse disorders will also be covered. The basic biology underlying these disorders will be presented as part of the discussion of the therapeutic mechanisms of drug action.

Section A: Douglas Hoffman
Time: Saturday & Sunday, February 21 &22
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 20
Credits: 1


PY 899
Doctoral Dissertation

Year V+ students who have already completed 2,000 hours of internship, need register for only PY 899, Doctoral Dissertation. Students must register for doctoral dissertation each semester until the dissertation has been deposited.
Section A: George Tremblay

Credits: uncredited


PYR 876
Doctoral Research Seminar II

Competency Area: Research and Inquiry
Required of and Restricted to Year III students.

This is a continuation of Doctoral Research Seminar I.

Section A: Kathi Borden
Section B: Ted Ellenhorn
Section C: James Fauth
Section D: Susan Hawes
Section E: Vic Pantesco
Section F: Roger Peterson
Section G: Gargi Roysircar
Section H: Colborn Smith
Section I: George Tremblay
Section J: Martha Straus
(Section assignments will be
made by the department)
Time: February 9 & 23, March 22
and April 5 & 26,
1:00 – 3:30 pm
Maximum: 5 per section
Credits: 1


PYR 878
Doctoral Research Seminar IV

Competency Area: Research and Inquiry
Required of and Restricted to Year IV students.

This is a continuation of Doctoral Research Seminar III.

Section A: Kathi Borden
Section B: Ted Ellenhorn
Section C: Susan Hawes
Section D: Vic Pantesco
Section E: Roger Peterson
Section F: Gargi Roysircar
Section G: Colborn Smith
Section H: George Tremblay
(Section assignments will be made by the department)
Time: Mondays, January 26, February 2 & 16,
March 1, 8 & 29, April 12 & 19, and May 3 & 10,
1:00 – 3:30 pm
Maximum: 5 per section
Credits: 2


PYC 725
Eating Disorders

Course Added (03/01/04)
Competency Area: Clinical Techniques & Methods/Interventions

Students will learn differential diagnosis of eating/weight disorders and their treatment. An integrative treatment model which includes psychoeducation along with cognitive-behavioral and psychodynamic treatment techniques will be presented. The influence of culture/media will be addressed, including the stigmatization of obesity. This workshop will cover adolescent and adult populations only.

Section A: Margaret Goodwin
Time: Saturday & Sunday, April 17 & 18, 9:00 – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 15
Credits: 1


PY 859C
Fundamental Clinical Skills II

Competency Area: Relationship
Required of and Restricted to Year I students.

This course focuses on the application of the basic relationship skills to specific clinical contexts. It is designed as a continuation of the Fundamental Clinical Skills I course and includes the initial interview (i.e., history taking, the mental status exam, and problem assessment) and crisis intervention. This course involves practice in interviewing and practicing in specific clinical contexts.

Section A: Chet Lesniak
Time: Saturday & Sunday,
February 14 & 15,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Section B: Chet Lesniak
Time: Saturday & Sunday,
March 13 & 14,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 15 per section
Credits: 1


PY 777B
Human Diversity and the Clinical Enterprise

Competency Area: Social Bases of Behavior
Required of and Restricted to Year I students.

This course utilizes principles and concepts of multicultural and cross-cultural psychology to attempt to acquire an increased understanding of diverse under-represented groups, with an emphasis on understanding racism, sexism, heterosexism, classism, and ageism. It utilizes the multicultural competencies perspective to facilitate learning how to perform effective clinical work with individuals who are of different cultures, ethnicities, genders, sexual orientations, socioeconomic status, ages, ability, religion, and spirituality.

Section A: Gargi Roysircar
Time: Mondays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Section B: Gargi Roysircar
Time: Mondays, 4:30 – 7:00 pm
(Section assignments will be
made by the department)
Maximum: 15 per section
Credits: 3


PY 718A
Human Sexuality and Sex Therapy

Competency Area: Clinical Techniques &
Methods/Interventions
Prerequisite: Reading assignments, available from the bookstore, are to be completed prior to the start of the workshop.

Nearly every client welcomes the chance to be more comfortable and satisfied with his or her sex life. Designed for those new to working with sex-related problems, the focus is on the pragmatic: understanding the theoretical underpinning of sexual disorders; clarifying ones own sexual attitudes, feelings, and preferences; using sexual language comfortably; offering permission; dispelling myths, and understanding how and when to offer specific suggestions. Theoretically, the course will primarily take a cognitive-behavioral perspective, but family systems, Ericksonian and object relations theories will also be applied as pertinent. Given the practical skills-building focus, participants spend a significant portion of their time interacting in class discussions and experiential exercises, and in self-examination through in-class journal writing. Please be advised that this workshop contains sexually explicit language and media presentations.

Section A: Kathy McMahon
Time: Saturday & Sunday, April 24 & 25
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 20
Credits: 1


PY 896
Internship (Year IV students)
PY 897
Internship (Year V+ students)

Prior to graduation, each student must successfully complete an approved internship of 2,000 hours within 24 calendar months which meets the guidelines published by the Council for the National Register of Health Service Providers in Psychology. Internship may be pursued in several formats: half-time during the fourth and fifth years; full-time during the fifth year, etc. Year IV students should register for PY 896, Internship, and Year V+ students should register for PY 897, Internship.

Section A: Colborn Smith
Credits: uncredited


PY 816
Methods of Psychological Assessment II

Competency Area: Clinical Techniques &
Methods/Interventions
Required of and Restricted to Year I students who took PY 815 Methods of Psychological Assessment I.

This course continues an introduction to psychological assessment of individuals, with a major focus in the fall on the role of psychological tests in personality assessment, and with attention also paid to psychoeducational and neuropsychological assessment. Students develop beginning competence in the administration, scoring, and interpretation of a standard battery of projective psychodiagnostic techniques in combination with the tests learning in the fall.

Section A: Chet Lesniak
Time: Mondays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Section B: Jim Graves
Time: Mondays, 4:30 – 7:00 pm
(Section assignments will be
made by the department)
Maximum: 15 per section
Credits: 3


PY 800
Organizational Issues

Competency Area: Management & Supervision
Required of Year IV students.

This course presents theory, practice, and research applicable to understanding organizational issues. This includes an advanced discussion of the professional psychologist as a change agent in organizational settings. An experiential approach will be utilized in order to create a context for these conversations and to achieve students’ learning objectives. Students will explore infrastructure areas including, but not limited to, management, human resources, training, finance, and quality improvement. Also included in this section are issues involving strategic planning, governing ideas, organizational relationships, nonprofit boards, and leadership. In addition, the course will apply a critique of normative assumptions about organizational behavior, and address issues of diversity in organizations.

Section A: David Hamolsky
Time: Mondays, February 9 & 23,
March 22, and April 5 & 26,
1:00 – 3:30 pm
Maximum: 20
Credits: 1


PY 730
Personality: Theory and Assessment

Competency Area: Individual Behavior and Individual Differences
Required of and Restricted to Year I students.

This course will provide an overview of critical concepts, theory and knowledge about personality structure, dynamics, change and development. Using case examples, the assessment and diagnosis of personality will be explored through the integration of test data, interview, history, and theoretical understanding. The course is designed to facilitate the student’s development of a viewpoint that can be related to treatment issues and concepts of health and maladaptive behavior. Specific theory topics include: drive theory, ego psychology, object relations theory, interpersonal theory, self-psychology, social constructivism, biological/evolutionary, and French post-structuralist and feminist perspectives on personality theory. The theories will be examined regarding issues of individual differences and group differences; including differences in culture, gender, sexual orientation, and social and economic class.

Section A: Ted Ellenhorn
Time: Tuesdays, 1:00 – 3:30 pm
Maximum: 23
Credits: 3


PY 881B
Professional Seminar II:
Roles of Psychologists and Ethical Issues

Required of and Restricted to Year I students.

This is a continuation of Professional Seminar I: Roles of Psychologists and Ethical Issues.

Section A: David Arbeitman
Section B: Mick Foot
Section C: William Halikias
Section D: Diana Sholtz
(Section assignments will be made by the department)
Time: Mondays, 1:00 – 3:30 pm
Maximum: 8 per section
Credits: 3


PY 883B
Professional Seminar IV:
Case Conceptualization and Demonstrations
PY 892
Practicumon and Demonstrations
PY 892
Practicum

This is a continuation of Professional Seminar III: Case Conceptualization and Demonstrations.

Section A: Margaret Goodwin
Section B: Barbara Belcher-Timme
Section C: Jim Graves
Section D: David Junno
(Section assignments will be made by the department)
Time: Mondays, 1:00 – 3:30 pm
Maximum: 8 per section
Credits: 3 and 3


PY 732
Psychological Development

Competency Area: Individual Behavior and Individual Differences
Required of and Restricted to Year II students.

This course approaches behavior in infancy, early childhood, adolescence and adulthood through the framework of a Life Span Developmental theoretical orientation. Classical developmental theories as well as issues in development such as emotional, social, cognitive, and moral growth are examined within this context. The student learns about clinical and theoretical problems in development through required readings and case material.

Section A: Martha B. Straus
Time: Mondays, 4:30 – 7:00 pm
Maximum: 28
Credits: 3


PYC 701
Psychotherapeutic Intervention II: Individual and Family

Competency Area: Clinical Techniques &
Methods/Interventions
Required of and Restricted to Year I students who took PYC 700 Psychotherapeutic Intervention I.

This is the second part of the yearlong course on psychotherapeutic intervention in both theory and practice with individual adults, families, and children. The goal is to develop a flexible, integrated style of conducting treatment, focusing on brief to mid-range durations. Emphasis is on psychodynamic, cognitive and systemic thinking, and selected clinical practice and process issues are considered across a variety of psychological disorders. Issues such as the therapist’s role, factors in change, gender effects, and treatment duration and flexibility are evaluated. Methods include readings, discussion, student and instructor presentations, sharing of relevant personal and professional experience, and skill practice.

Section A: Diana Sholtz
Section B: Martha B. Straus
(Section assignments will be made by the department)
Time: Tuesdays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 15 per section
Credits: 3


PYS 775
Public Policy, Advocacy, and Health Service Delivery

Competency Area: Social Bases of Behavior
Required of and Restricted to Year III students.

This course presents theory, practice, and research applicable to understanding public policy and health service delivery systems, and to recognizing the manner in which these two areas are interrelated. This includes an advanced discussion of the professional psychologist as a change agent in the larger social, political, and economic contexts, and the professional psychologist’s roles within private and public sectors. An experiential approach will be utilized in order to create a context for these conversations and to achieve students’ learning objectives. Subjects included in the service delivery section are psychologists as managers, team learning, the effects of managed care on systems of service delivery, program outputs, client outcomes, empirically validated procedures, and budgets. In the Public Policy section of this course, students will form learning teams to construct a public policy agenda and then conduct research in order to inform and support the defined agenda. Teams will also formulate a public policy action plan. Issues included in this course are psychology in the public interest, the role of the social scientist, specific public policy issues affecting psychology, parity laws, and rural health.

Section A: David Hamolsky
Time: Mondays, January 26, February 2 & 16,
March 8 & 29, April 12 & 19, and May 3 & 10,
1:00 – 3:30 pm
Maximum: 27
Credits: 2


PY 872
Research Methods and Statistics II

Competency Area: Research and Inquiry

Required of and Restricted to Year II students.

This course is a continuation of PY 871 Research Methods and Statistics I

Section A: George Tremblay
Time: Mondays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 27
Credits: 3


PY 703
A Social History of Popular Psychological Discourses

Competency Area: History & Systems of Psychology
Restricted to Year III & Year IV students.

This workshop examines psychology as one of many modern forms of discourse. Participants will be introduced to some of the ways in which psychology has entered into and contributed to transformations of social relations in modern western cultures. Various discursive media will be explored, including linguistic, artistic, and spatial forms. Particular attention will be paid to popular media, such as 18th century chapbooks, Victorian public lectures and instructional print, self-help publications, and technology.

Section A: Susan Hawes
Time: Saturday & Sunday, February 28 & 29,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 12
Credits: 1


PY 894C
Special Proficiency Practicum

Restricted to Year IV students.

This is a Practicum for Year IV students wishing to have further clinical training experience with a specific focus for less than 12 hours per week with a minimum of 100 hours per semester.

Section A: Lorraine Mangione
Credits: 1


PY 867
Supervised Experience in the Teaching of Clinical Psychology
For Teaching Assistants of Fundamental Clinical Skills II

Competency Area: Consultation and Education

This course involves supervised teaching within the program. Students conduct background research, prepare material to teach, present the material, supervise small group activities, and grade course assignments, all under the supervision of the primary faculty person.

Sections A & B: Chet Lesniak
Section A: Time: Saturday & Sunday,
February 14 & 15, 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Section B: Time: Saturday & Sunday,
March 13 & 14, 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 5
Credits: 1 and 1
(Students may sign up for one or both sections.)


PY 890 SIS:
Supervised Independent Study
PY 890C SIS:
Dissertation Research

The SIS is for students who wish to have a directed learning experience focused on a specific project or area of interest.

Applied Experience SIS Topics:
Often students in Year III & Year IV, who wish to have a directed learning experience of a practical nature focused on a specific project, elect an SIS in an Applied Experience in Clinical Psychology. These Applied Experiences SIS are organized according to the NCSPP competency areas and are designed to more clearly reflect applied experience for transcript, licensure, and internship application information. Please be certain to include the title and competency areas on SIS contract; course numbers will be assigned by the Registrar