Applied Psychology Courses Spring 2004


PYC 668
Adolescent and Family Counseling

Course Cancelled (01/15/04)
Restricted to CP II students; others by written permission of Program Director attached to or on registration form.
Prerequisite: Completion of all CP I courses and internships.

This course is designed to introduce the student to the theory and practice of marriage/relationship/family counseling with an emphasis on families in which the adolescent is the identified client. Marriage/relationship/family therapy approaches and effective models of adolescent treatment within this context will be addressed, integrating models of working with larger systems, such as schools and social services. Topics include assessment and interventions strategies for eating disorders, substance abuse, depression, PTSD, and risk-taking behaviors.

Section A: Larry Ruhf
Time: Tuesdays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 15
Credits: 3


PYI 523
Art Therapy

Competency Area: Individual Assessment and Intervention Strategies

Art Therapy is a distinct health profession that incorporates creative expression of feelings within a therapeutic relationship to address physical, psychological, cognitive, emotional and social needs of adults and children of all ages. This course will introduce the benefits of incorporating art into therapy, education, and medicine to enrich communication, understanding and self-expression. A variety of materials and interventions will be explored on both a didactic level and through experiential exercises. Slides and case examples will highlight the use of art as an assessment tool and treatment modality.

Section A: Erika Leeuwenburgh,
Time: Saturday & Sunday, April 17 & 18,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 24
Credits: 1


PYC 652
Career/Lifestyle Development

Restricted to Applied Psychology students; others by written permission of Program Director attached to or on registration form.
Section A: Priority to CP II students.
Section B: Priority to SA/AC II students.
Sections C & D: Priority to Fall 2003 CP/SA/AC entrants.
Prerequisites: PY 590A, Fundamentals of Therapeutic Interaction and PYB 505, Human Development and Diversity, or equivalent.

This course will provide both the theoretical foundation and practical experience necessary to understand and foster career/life development in individual and group counseling settings. Topics include career and developmental theories; the elements and evaluation of life careers; administration and interpretation of career-related assessment instruments; and definition of the role, ethics and professional identity within the field of career development.

Section A – C: Carlotta Willis
Section D: Meg Connor
Time: Section A: Tuesdays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Section B: Tuesdays, 4:00 – 6:30 pm
Sections C & D: Wednesdays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 20 per section
Credits: 3


PYI 521
Clinical Work With Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual,
and Transgender (LGBT) Clients

Course Cancelled (03/01/04)
Competency Areas: Individual Assessment & Intervention Strategies

This course will provide an introductory understanding of theories, principles, and practices relevant to conducting competent clinical work with gay, bisexual, transgender, and lesbian clients in counseling or psychotherapy. Among the topics to be discussed are: the sociocultural context of LGBT clients; the role of homophobia and heterosexism in the lives of LGBT people; internalized homophobia; common clinical issues with (some) LGBT clients; scripts for LGBT people; sources of resilience for LGBT people; dynamics between LGBT clients and their (LGBT or heterosexual) therapists/counselors. The workshop will include didactic presentations, discussion, and other media resources.

Section A: Glenda Russell
Time: Saturday & Sunday, April 3 & 4,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 24
Credits: 1


PYI 522
Counseling Skills Lab

Competency Areas: Individual Assessment & Intervention Strategies
Prerequisite: PY 590A, Fundamentals of Therapeutic Interaction

This course will focus on further enhancement of the technical and conceptual skills of counseling. The course will consist of reflection on the development of the self-in-role and continued application of theory to practice through in-class skills exercises and supervision.

Section A: Meg Connor
Section B: Thomas Barker
Section C: TBA
Maximum: 12 per section
Time: Wednesdays, 4:00 – 5:30 pm
Credits: 1


PYC 675
Crisis Intervention: Cognitive Behavioral Approaches

Restricted to CP II students: others by written permission of Program Director attached to or on registration form.
Prerequisite: Completion of all CP I courses and internships.

This course will provide an overview to the theory and practice of crisis intervention from a cognitive-behavioral perspective. The variety of crisis situations and the phenomenon of suicide will be examined as well as the roles and responsibilities of counselors in making the interventions. Students will be exposed to a variety of models of counseling under the heading of cognitive-behavioral with the objective of helping the student develop an integrated approach to the range of problems that clients present. Members will have the opportunity to present case material to the class.

Section A: Ken Bacon
Time: Tuesdays, 4:00 – 6:30 pm
Maximum: 15
Credits: 3


PY 618A
Dance/Movement Therapy with Adults

Competency Area: Individual Assessment & Intervention Strategies
Required of and Priority to DMT II students. Open to CP II & SA/AC II students as a PYC equivalent; others by written permission of Program Director attached to or on registration form.

This course will present a theoretical and practical framework for in-depth work and brief treatment models in dance/movement therapy with a variety of adult populations. Trauma and addictions recovery models, along with mind-body and object relations frameworks are examined and integrated with KMP, Laban and Body-Mind CenteringTM concepts. Techniques such as somatic countertransference, gestalt work, integrated transformational healing, dramatic improvisational experiments, rechoreography of object relations and authentic movement are explored and experienced.

Section A: Kim Burden
Time: Tuesdays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 20
Credits: 3


PYC 666
Family Therapy Approaches To Addictions Treatment

Required of and Restricted to SA/AC II students; others by written permission of Program Director attached to or on registration form.
Prerequisite: PYC 626, completion of all CP/SA/AC I courses and internships.

This course will provide an understanding of the structure and dynamics of marriage and other committed relationships, and families, and look at a variety of systemic interventions including structural, strategic, and Bowenian approaches. Special attention will be given to understanding of and intervention with shame based family systems including families with addictions, domestic violence and other family problems that require broad-based as well as dynamic interventions.

Section A: Diane Kurinsky
Time: Tuesdays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 13
Credits: 3


PY 590A
Fundamentals of Therapeutic Interaction

Competency Area: Individual Assessment & Intervention Strategies
Required of and Priority to Spring 2004 entering CP, SA/AC students.

This course is designed to help the beginning mental health professional acquire fundamental counseling skills. Theoretical approaches, including cognitive behavioral, systemic, humanistic, relational, and psychodynamic, will be introduced. Topics include counselor roles and ethics, the dimensions of contemporary mental health practice, and the multicultural counseling perspective. Students will also explore the particular interpersonal dynamics of helping relationships and develop self-in-role awareness. The course balances theory and practical learning through in-class counseling practice.

Section A: Laura Copland
Section B: Ann McCloskey
Time: Wednesdays, 4:00 – 6:30 pm
Maximum: 15 per section
Credits: 3


PYG 604
Group Dance/Movement Therapy

Competency Area: Group Assessment & Intervention Strategies
Required of and Restricted to DMT I students; others by written permission of Program Director attached to or on registration form.

This course will provide methods in group Dance/Movement Therapy (DMT) useful in the treatment of clients in a variety of clinical settings, with special attention to group dynamics and development. The Chace approach will be utilized to teach basic DMT group skills; other leadership styles and techniques will be examined to prepare the student for DMT internship experiences with a wide variety of populations. The instructor will present theoretical material and facilitate experiential learning through lecture, discussion, video, group processing, and reflection papers. Students will have the opportunity to develop their own style and expertise by designing and implementing role-played DMT groups appropriate to the population of their choice.

Section A: Phyllis Jeswald
Time: Wednesdays, 1:00 – 3:30 pm
Maximum: 20
Credits: 3


PYB 505
Human Development and Diversity

Competency Area: Behavioral Science Foundation
Required of and Priority to Spring 2004 entering CP, SA/AC students.

This course will provide an overview of human development throughout the lifetime in the family, social and cultural context. The individual and family life cycles will be viewed as mutually interactive processes that are also affected by such factors as biology/genetics, gender, race, ethnicity, acculturation, religion, etc. The development of the individual will be traced chronologically through a survey of a select number of major theoretical approaches. The family and other factors influencing and generated by the individual’s developmental tasks will be explored concurrently.

Section A: Ann McCloskey
Section B: William Griffith
Time: Wednesdays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 15 per section
Credits: 3


PY 693
Internship in Dance/Movement Therapy

Required of and Restricted to DMT students who have completed their coursework.

A supervised six- to nine-month DMT internship (minimum 700 hours) in a clinical setting in keeping with standards approved by the American Dance Therapy Association.

Section A: Phyllis Jeswald
Credits: 4


PY 693B
Internship Continuation

For Dance/Movement students continuing an internship begun in the Fall 2003 semester, through the Spring 2004 semester.

Section A: Phyllis Jeswald
Credits: uncredited


PYI 514
Methods of Testing and Assessment

Competency Area: Individual Assessment & Intervention Strategies
Required of and Restricted to CP I and SA/AC I students; others by written permission of the Program Director attached to or on registration form.
Prerequisite: PYB 506 Psychopathology: An Ecological Approach

This course will provide students with an overview of the theoretical, historical and cultural bases for assessment. Ethical standards, issues related to age, gender, ethnicity, culture, language and disabilities as they pertain to psychological testing and assessment, assessment methods and instruments, and the concepts of reliability, validity and the psychometrics of assessment will be covered. Students will have opportunities to examine a wide range of standardized tests, psychological inventories, projective materials, self-report measures, and technical and interpretive manuals and instructions throughout the semester. Students successfully completing this course will be better able to understand and interpret psychological test and assessment information in their roles as mental health counselors.

Section A: TBA
Section B: Richard Toye
Time: Tuesdays, 12:45 – 3:15 pm
Maximum: 20 per section
Credits: 3


PYP 692
Practicum II in Dance/Movement Therapy

Required of and Restricted to DMT I students.

Practicum in Dance/Movement Therapy provides students with an opportunity to observe various clinical and educational settings and populations and to participate in DMT sessions led and supervised by practitioners in the field. Learning to identify group and individual interventions and applying theoretical learning from other courses are prime goals of the course.

Section A: Susan Loman,
Claire LeMessurier & Kim Burden
Time: Wednesdays, 9:00 – 1:00 pm
(individual times may vary)
Maximum: 16
Credits: 2


PY 687
Professional Seminar in Counseling Psychology II -
Emphasis: Social and Cultural Foundations (DMT II)
PY 695A
Internship, Counseling Psychology (DMT)

Restricted to DMT II students.

Please Note: Students will continue with the same instructor from Fall 2003 semester. Please specify section letter clearly on registration form to ensure being registered for the correct section.

This is a continuation of Professional Seminar in Counseling Psychology I for DMT II students and offers students a strong theoretical foundation in the social and cultural factors influencing human behavior, as well as an applied clinical component of case consultation and internship support. Case consultation and support in this semester will provide an opportunity to utilize the theories in students’ current practice.

Section A: Alice Scudder
Section B: Nathan Schappin
Section C: Kim Burden
Time: Tuesdays, 12:45 – 3:15 pm
Maximum: 10 per section
Credits: ProSem: 3; Internship: 3


PY 687
Professional Seminar in Counseling Psychology II -
Emphasis: Professional Ethics
(CP and SA/AC I Students)
PY 695D
Internship

Restricted to continuing students.
Prerequisite: Completion of PY 695 Practicum in Counseling Psychology I and PY 686 Professional Seminar in Counseling Psychology I.

Please Note: Students will continue with the same instructor from Fall semester. Please specify section letter clearly on registration form to ensure being registered for the correct section.

The Professional Seminar will focus on the ethical standards and legal issues related to clinical practice. Students will become familiar with the American Counseling Association Code of Ethical Standards and the various statutory requirements that impact on the work with clients. The student will be able to recognize the ethical principles and legal issues related to the counselor role and to utilize this knowledge in their work with clients and colleagues.

Concurrent with the Professional Seminar, CP and SA/AC I students must participate in an internship, totaling at least 600 hours over the course of the Fall 2003 and Spring 2004 semesters at an approved site. It is expected that the remainder of the 600 hours will be completed this semester.

Sections A – C – for DMT II students only.
Sections D – K: Restricted to CP and SA/AC I students.
Section D: Molly Scott
Section E: Dana Mann
Section F: Larry Ruhf
Section H: Ann McCloskey
Section I: Betsy Taylor
Section J: Ramona Anderson
Section K: Robert Chalif
Time: Tuesdays, 4:00 – 6:30 pm
Maximum: 8 per section
Credits: ProSem: 3; Internship: 4


PY 689
Professional Seminar in Counseling Psychology IV -
Emphasis: Professional Identity
(CP II and SA/AC II)
PY 696
Internship, Counseling Psychology

Restricted to continuing CP and SA/AC II students.
Prerequisite: Completion of PY 688 Professional Seminar in Counseling Psychology III and PY 696C Internship in Counseling Psychology III.

This final semester of the professional seminar is the capstone course in the student’s development as a mental health counselor. An understanding of the professional history, standards and practices is key to this course. Students will be supported in their transition to mental health professionals through in-depth exploration of self-in-role, readings and discussions on selected topics in mental health practice, continued discussions of ethical practice, and final competency demonstrations of integration of theory and practice.

Concurrent with the Professional Seminar, CP II students must participate in an Internship, totaling at least 600 hours over the course of the Fall 2003 and Spring 2004 semesters at an approved site. It is expected that the remainder of the 600 hours will be completed this semester.

Section A: Ken Bacon
Section B: Diane Kurinsky
Section C: Dana Mann
Section D: Ann McCloskey
Section E: Betsy Taylor
Section F: Heri Tryba
Time: Tuesdays, 12:45 – 3:15 pm
Maximum: 8 per section
Credits: ProSem: 3; Internship: 4


PY 681B
Professional Seminar in Dance/Movement Therapy II -
Emphasis: Professional Orientation

Required of and Restricted to DMT I students.

The Professional Seminar in Dance/Movement Therapy provides students with a vehicle for the integration of practica experiences, conceptual material and one’s personal style and development. It will offer an overview of the profession and a forum to discuss ethics and personal and professional issues. This semester will focus on issues relating to becoming a professional in the field of dance/movement therapy.

Section A: Alice Scudder
Time: Tuesdays, 4:00 – 6:30 pm
Maximum: 16
Credits: 3


PY 687A
Professional Seminar in Marriage & Family Therapy II
PY 697
Practicum in Marriage & Family Therapy

Restricted to continuing MFT I students.

Please Note: Students will continue with the same instructor from Fall semester. Please specify section letter clearly on registration form to ensure being registered for the correct section.

This course is a continuation of Professional Seminar in Marriage & Family Therapy I. During this semester students’ practica will continue to be monitored and supervised, casework will be introduced, and issues of becoming a systems professional will be covered. Students will begin to discuss their affinities toward their own styles of thinking and working. During this semester of the professional seminar, students will continue to work on professional issues and focus their learning on the study of ethics in the field.

Section A: Paki Wieland
Section B: Judy Davis
Section C: Tim Lowry
Section D: Steve Gaddis
Time: Tuesdays, 12:45 – 3:15
Maximum: 6 per section
Credits: ProSem: 3; Practicum: 4


PY 689A
Professional Seminar in Marriage & Family Therapy V
PY 698
Internship in Marriage & Family Therapy

Restricted to continuing MFT II students.

Please Note: Students will continue with the same instructor from Fall 2003 semester. Please specify section letter clearly on registration form to ensure being registered for the correct section.

This is a continuation of Professional Seminar in Marriage & Family Therapy IV (PY 688B)

Section A: David Watts
Section B: Julia Halevy
Time: Tuesdays, 12:45 – 3:15 pm
Maximum: 6 per section
Credits: ProSem: 3; Internship: 4


PYB 514
Psychomotor Assessment of Adults

Competency Area: Behavioral Science Foundation
Required of and Restricted to DMT I students; others by written permission of the Program Director attached to or on registration form.

This course is a continuation of the exploration of movement observations and assessment begun in the previous semester. Emphasis will be placed on developing skills in notating, diagramming and interpreting five categories of movement patterns within the Kestenberg Movement Profile and in Labananalysis representing dynamics and shaping in space applicable to adult populations. Students will learn the applications of these movement patterns in clinical diagnosis and treatment of adults.

Section A: Susan Loman
Time: Tuesdays, 12:45 – 3:15 pm
Maximum: 20
Credits: 3


PY 656
Psychopathology & the Assessment of Social Systems

Competency Area: Social Systems Assessment & Intervention Strategies
Required of and Restricted to MFT I students; others by written permission of the Program Director attached to or on registration form.
Prerequisites: Fundamentals of Systems Therapy, Introduction to Systems Theory, and Survey of Family Theory.

This course is designed to instruct students in the theory and methods of clinical assessment of psychopathology and multiaxial diagnosis. In addition, students will learn the theory and research of family systems assessments and are taught how to perform an integrated assessment of individual, family, extended family, and extra-familial context, including a mental status exam and DSM-IV diagnosis.

Section A: Richard Toye
Time: Tuesdays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 24
Credits: 3


PYB 513
Psychopathology: Eating Disorders

Competency Area: Behavioral Science Foundation
Priority to second-year Applied Psychology students.

In this workshop, students will learn differential diagnosis and treatment of eating/weight disorders within an individual psychotherapy model. Learning will occur through didactic presentations, case presentations, experiential exercises, and class discussion. The influence of culture and media on eating disorders will be addressed as well as issues concerning the stigmatization of obesity. Family, dance/movement, and 12-step techniques will not be formally addressed but are welcome in discussion.

Section A: Margaret Goodwin
Time: Saturday & Sunday, March 27 & 28,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 24
Credits: 1


PY 563
Psychopathology: Psychopharmacology of Substance Abuse

Competency Area: Behavioral Science Foundation
Required of and Priority to SA/AC II students.

This course will present current concepts of addiction, drugs of abuse and pharmacological treatments for those in recovery from addiction. Special attention will be given to mechanisms of tolerance and the concepts of tolerance, addiction, and drug-seeking behavior. Related basic concepts such as neurotransmitters, receptor sites, drug interaction and other pharmacological dynamics will be presented in support of the basic discussion.

Section A: Douglas Hoffman
Time: Saturday & Sunday, January 24 & 25,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 24
Credits: 1


PYB 515
Research and Evaluation in Dance/Movement Therapy

Competency Area: Behavioral Science Foundations
Required of and Restricted to DMT II students, others by written permission of Program Director attached to or on registration form. Equivalent to PYC 654.

This course will provide students with an overview of how to effectively use library resources and understand quantitative and qualitative research methods including program evaluation, research evaluation, ethical issues in research, and APA publication guidelines. In addition, this course will provide students the opportunity to critically examine research in dance/movement therapy and related topics.

Section A: Nathan Schappin
Time: Tuesdays, 4:00 – 6:30 pm
Maximum: 20
Credits 3


PYB 523
Psychopharmacology for Counselors

Course Added (01/06/04)
Competency Area: Behavioral Science Foundation
Priority to students who were registered for the Fall 2003 class (cancelled due to weather conditions).

This weekend course will focus on the clinical uses of psychotropic medications in the treatment of affective disorders, psychotic disorders and anxiety disorders. The mechanisms by which abused substances affect the body and drugs used in the treatment of substance abuse disorders will also be covered. The basic biology underlying these disorders will be presented as part of the discussion of the therapeutic mechanisms of drug action.

Section A: Douglas Hoffman
Time: Saturday & Sunday, February 28 & 29, 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 24
Credits: 1


PYC 674A
Research and Evaluation in Family Studies

Required of and Priority to MFT students. Open to CP II as equivalent to PYC 654; others by written permission of Program Director attached to or on registration form.
Prerequisite: Completion of MFT I courses.

In addition to providing the student with a background in the basics of research methodology, this course will focus on the major themes and controversies in the field of marriage and family therapy. It will also teach students how to use journals and current literature in the field in order to enhance their knowledge and to aid them in viewing their work and the work of others more critically.

Section A: Tim Lowry
Time: Tuesdays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 24
Credits: 3


PYS 604
Social and Cultural Diversity

Competency Area: CP: Social Systems Assessment & Intervention Strategies; MFT: Group Assessment and Intervention Strategies
Required of and Priority to CP Spring 2004 enterers, Summer 2003 CP entrants and MFT I; others by written permission of the Program Director attached to or on registration form.
Section A: Required of and Restricted to MFT I students, others by written permission of Program Director attached to or on registration form.
Sections:B – D: Required of and restricted to Spring 2004, Fall 2003 CP and SA/AC entrants.

This course will expose students to issues of ethnicity, race, gender, socioeconomic status, culture, sexual orientation, physical/psychological ability, religion, age, etc. as these relate to their development as therapists/counselors. Students will explore their own attitudes and beliefs through experiential exercises, small- and large-group discussions. Through discussions of texts, novels, films and lectures, students will learn about historical contexts and contemporary concerns of diverse groups. In order to provide a foundation for competent and ethical practice, students will examine strategies for working professionally as individual, group and family therapists/counselors with diverse populations.

Section A: Dottie Morris
Section B: Dottie Morris
Section C: Paki Wieland
Section D: TBA
Time: Section A: Tuesdays, 4:00 – 6:30 pm
Sections B, C & D: Wednesdays, 1:00 – 3:30 pm
Maximum: 18 per section
Credits: 3


PY 678
Special Issues In Family Therapy:
Addictions & Intrafamilial Violence

Restricted to MFT II students; PYC equivalent for CP/SA/AC II with written permission; others by written permission of Program Director attached to or on registration form.

This course is designed to expand the conceptual constructs and treatment strategies of the students in their work with families in which there is violence and/or addictions. The issues of clinical interventions in dealing with intrafamilial violence and addictions will be extensively addressed. Time will be allotted for students to research and to present on their interests in these topics and the clinical issues they raise. We will consider the cultural contexts of the occurrences and treatment of family violence and addictions. The course objectives will be met by increasing the students’ understanding of both the client and ourselves in our cultural contexts. In doing this the student will be better equipped to explore his/her use of self in the relationship with the family in treatment.

Section A: Steve Gaddis
Time: Tuesdays, 4:00 – 6:30 pm
Maximum: 24
Credits: 3


PY 690
SIS: Supervised Independent Study

If you are planning an independent study, please register for an SIS on your registration form. However, an SIS contract must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office by April 20, 2004, in order for it to appear on your schedule or transcript. Please be sure to specify on the contract if the SIS will be used to fulfill a competency area or serve as a required course substitute, or as an elective. Contracts received after the April 20 deadline will be returned to you for registration in a subsequent semester (additional costs may apply). Credits will not appear on your schedule until the SIS contract(s) has been submitted to the Registrar’s Office, thus affecting your enrollment status and perhaps financial aid eligibility.

Credits: variable


PYC 663
Spirituality and Counseling

Restricted to CP II and SA/AC II students; others by written permission of Program Director attached to or on registration form.
Prerequisite: Completion of all CP/SA/AC I courses and internships.

This course will combine a survey of transpersonal theory with an approach to counseling which emanates from that theory. The developmental approach of Wilber and Washburn, the consciousness studies of Tart and Grof and the psychology of spiritual traditions will form a theoretical foundation. Issues include assessing the spiritual condition of client and counselor, the role of religious training in personality development, distinguishing religious and spiritual issues from pathology, and assessing spiritual discipline in counseling. Regular participation in spiritual practice and half an hour daily practice is required.

Section A: John Van Ness
Time: Tuesdays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 15
Credits: 3


PY 572
Theories of Addiction

Competency Area: Behavioral Science Foundation
Required of ALL CP students.
Priority to CP II students.

This course will serve as a basic introduction to the psychopathology of substance abuse and addiction. The class will examine various theories that seek to define addiction, discuss diagnosis and assessment of chemical dependency, and explore stages of treatment and different treatment modalities. The program of Alcoholics Anonymous will be analyzed as a generic model of 12-step programs. Other self-help formats will be identified and described.

Section A: Sara DeGennaro
Time: Saturday & Sunday, March 6 & 7,
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maximum: 24
Credits: 1


PYI 512
Theories of Personality and Individual Counseling

Competency Area: Individual Assessment & Intervention Strategies
Required of and Restricted to CP I, SA/AC I and DMT I students; others by written permission of the Program Director attached to or on registration form.
Prerequisites: PY 590A, Fundamentals of Therapeutic Interaction and PYB 505, Human Development & Diversity.

The course provides a foundation in the historical and current theories of personality and individual counseling. A variety of perspectives will be presented, e.g., psychodynamic, cognitive, behavioral, interpersonal, humanistic, transpersonal and existential. Students will apply these theories to clinical work, through an understanding of behavior, psychodynamics, social and cultural contexts. The application of the theories will allow students to conceptualize their psychotherapeutic formulations and interventions.

Section A: Betsy Taylor
Section B: Dana Mann
Section C: Ken Bacon
Time: Tuesdays, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Maximum: 18 per section
Credits: 3