Organizational Management Courses Fall 2003

First Year Program
Second Year Program
Department Workshops – Keene
Department Workshops – Portsmouth


First Year Program


OMG 535
Group Dynamics & Leadership I

Competency Area: Collaboration & Group Dynamics (Required)
Required of first semester O&M students.

This course is designed specifically for first semester O&M students. It will focus on group development, group dynamics, and leadership. The course introduces students to elements of group dynamics and to a model that matches leadership styles to stages of group development. Students work in teams during the course and use course concepts to analyze their experience. Skills emphasized are group leadership and membership skills, group observation and feedback, conflict management, and managing diversity in groups. Students are expected to read The One Minute Manager Builds High Performing Teams by Blanchard, Carew and Parisi-Carew before the first class meeting. Students will do additional readings and discussions, field or research projects, or case study analysis on-line. Students should check the course conference on FirstClass, for on-line assignments that begin prior to the first class meeting.

Keene Site
Section K: Donna Mellen and Ed Tomey
Portsmouth Site
Section P: Peter Smith
Time: Saturdays & Sundays, September 13 & 14 and October 4 & 5*, 9:00 am – 4:30 pm
Maximum: 35 per section
(1st priority to O&M students, 2nd priority to ES students, 3rd priority to ED students)
Credits: 2


OMR 610
Information Technology: Concepts & Applications

Competency Area: Research & Information Design (Required)

This course will provide students with historical, current technical, and managerial perspectives on basic information systems and technology (IS/IT) concepts, as well as techniques and approaches for employing IS/IT in a management/knowledge worker role and in managing the IT resource. Specific topics covered include: a brief history of IS/IT, as well as contemporary issues and developments, spreadsheets, configuring systems, the use of Intranets for online team projects, and the use of the Internet as a management information resource. Students will be expected to use Excel spreadsheet software (or the equivalent) and PowerPoint. A significant portion of this course will be conducted on-line. Note: Students will be expected to participate in on-line exercises beginning in the first week of October. No student may add this course after September 26, 2003.

Keene Site
Section K: Thomas Smith
Time: Sunday, November 23 and Saturday, December 13 8:30 am – 5:30 pm
Portsmouth Site
Section P: William Griffith
Time: Sundays, November 23 and December 14,
8:30 am – 5:30 pm
Maximum: 18 per section
Credits: 2


OMG 531
Managing Diversity

Competency Area: Collaboration & Group Dynamics
(Required)

Successfully managing diversity and understanding the dynamics of difference in organizations requires skills in diagnosing and leading individuals and groups to acknowledge and capitalize on the richness of difference in all aspects of business, employee relations, and daily life. This course is intended to develop competencies and improve skills in managing and working effectively in a work force that reflects differences of every type. Students will: identify and develop competencies for managing the dynamics of change in the workplace; explore issues of sameness and difference; and enhance diagnostic skills for analyzing the dynamics of difference at the individual, interpersonal, group, and organizational levels. Students will do additional readings and discussions, field or research projects, or case study analysis on-line. Students should check the course conference on FirstClass, for on-line assignments that may begin prior to the first class meeting.

Keene Site
Section K: Wendy Elliott
Time: Saturday & Sunday, November 1 & 2,
Saturday, November 22 and
Sunday, December 14
9:00 am – 4:30 pm
Portsmouth Site
Section P: Marsha Greenberg
Time: Saturday & Sunday, November 1 & 2 and
Saturdays, November 22 and
December 13
9:00 am – 4:30 pm
Maximum: 24 per section
(1st priority to O&M students,
2nd priority to ES students)
Credits: 2


OMD 651
Professional Seminar

Competency Area: Self Development (Required)

Professional Seminar provides a setting in which students and faculty offer consultation and support regarding issues students face in their educational, professional, and personal development. All students enrolled in Professional Seminar and site faculty meet as a community, working together to develop a productive and inclusive learning group. Through dialogue and guided activities, we explore specific issues identified by students as they progress through their learning experience in the Department of Organization & Management. Students will have readings assigned throughout the semester with a special focus on the history of organizational theory and practice.

Keene Site
Section K: Tad Dwyer and Donna Mellen
Time: Fridays, September 12, October 3 & 31,
November 21 and December 12
6:30 – 9:00 pm
Maximum: 24
Credits: 2


OMD 654
Professional Seminar

Competency Area: Self Development (Required)

Professional Seminar provides a setting in which students and faculty offer consultation and support regarding issues students face in their educational, professional, and personal development. All students enrolled in Professional Seminar and site faculty meet as a community, working together to develop a productive and inclusive learning group. Through dialogue and guided activities, we explore specific issues identified by students as they progress through their learning experience in the Department of Organization & Management. Students will have readings assigned throughout the semester with a special focus on the history of organizational theory and practice.

Portsmouth Site
Section P: Marsha Greenberg and William Griffith
Time: Fridays, September 12, October 3 & 31,
November 21 and December 12
6:30 – 9:00 pm
Maximum: 24
Credits: 2


OM 690
SIS: Supervised Independent Study

If you are planning an independent study, please register for an SIS on your registration form. However, an SIS contract must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office by December 1, 2003, in order for it to appear on your schedule or transcript. Please be sure to specify on the contract if the SIS will be used to fulfill a competency area or serve as a required course substitute, or as an elective. Contracts received after the December 1 deadline will be returned to you for registration in a subsequent semester (additional costs may apply). Credits will not appear on your schedule until the SIS contract(s) has been submitted to the Registrar’s Office, thus affecting your enrollment status and perhaps your financial aid eligibility.

Credits: variable


Second Year Program


OMH 584
Designing & Conducting a Workshop

Competency Area: Human Resource Development

The course is designed for students who plan to use workshops as a vehicle for staff training and organization development work. A significant portion of this class involves fieldwork and regular on-line follow-up with the instructor. In the first class students will be introduced to the theory base that supports this type of training modality including adult and experiential learning, group dynamics and models of effective communication. Students will learn how to assess training needs and design appropriate training interventions to address those needs. Between classes students will conduct an actual training assessment and workshop design. In the final meeting students will present their design for analysis and feedback from the class. Students will do additional readings and discussions, field or research projects, or case study analysis on-line. Students should check the course conference on FirstClass, for on-line assignments that may begin prior to the first class meeting.

Keene Site
Section K: Tad Dwyer
Portsmouth Site
Section P: Sunny Bradford
Time: Sunday, September 14, Saturday, October 25, and

Sunday, December 14, 8:30 am – 5:30 pm
Maximum: 12 per section
Credits: 2


OMH 582
Developing Human Resources

(formerly Human Resource Development)
Competency Area: Human Resource Development (Required)

The development of Human Resources is the process through which an optimal fit is achieved between the employee, job, organization and environment so that employees attain levels of satisfaction and competence that enable performance and organizational goal attainment. This course takes a practical approach to the development and management of human resources. Students will explore various philosophies, theories and functions associated with the effective management and development of people in complex organizations. Topics will include: strategic human resources planning; staffing (planning, recruitment and selection); employment and employee relations; organizational culture; training and development; performance management; and career development. Special emphasis will be placed on the exploration of HRD issues as they relate to students’ areas of interest. Students will do additional readings and discussions, field or research projects, or case study analysis on-line. Students should check the course conference on FirstClass, for on-line assignments that may begin prior to the first class meeting.

Keene Site
Section K: TBA
Portsmouth Site
Section P: Stephen Schuit
Time: Saturdays, September 13, October 4,
November 1 & 22,
8:30 am – 5:30 pm
Maximum: 24 per section
Credits: 3


OMS 505
The Practice of Management: 4 Perspectives

Competency Area: Systems & Strategic Thinking (Required for MS students)

In this course, structure and content will revolve around four theoretical management perspectives. Organizational situations and issues will be considered from structural, human resources, political and symbolic/cultural points of view. In structured activities, students will experience the ways in which the lens of each perspective differently colors understanding and potential actions. Subsequent analysis will help students deepen their understanding and apply it to situations in their own personal and professional worlds. The summative learning for this course will be in the development and analysis of the students’ own theories of management and leadership and exploration of the elements of a personal practice to continue the process of deepening learning. Students will do additional readings and discussions, field or research projects, or case study analysis on-line. Students should check the course conference on FirstClass, for on-line assignments that may begin prior to the first class meeting.

Keene Site
Section K: Deborah Brown
Portsmouth Site
Section P: Tad Dwyer
Time: Sundays, October 5*, November 2 & 23,
and Saturday, December 13, 8:30 am – 5:30 pm
Maximum: 20 per section (1st priority to O&M students, 2nd priority to ES students)
Credits: 3


OMC 691
Practicum
Practicum Seminar

Competency Area: Purposeful Systemic Change (Required)
Restricted to matriculated O&M students

Under faculty guidance, students doing practicum work will discuss their practicum projects, evaluate their experience and consult with other students. The seminar is designed to help solve problems confronting students as their projects unfold and to sharpen analytical and consulting skills.

Keene Site
Section K1: Wendy Elliott
Section K2: Deborah Brown
Section K3: Pierre Zimmerman
Section K4: John Carr
Time: Fridays, September 12, October 3 & 31,
November 21 and December 12, 6:30 – 9:00 pm
Maximum: 8 per section
Credits: variable
(Practicum Seminar credited as part of Practicum)


OMC 694
Practicum
Practicum Seminar

Competency Area: Purposeful Systemic Change (Required)
Restricted to matriculated O&M students

Under faculty guidance, students doing practicum work will discuss their practicum projects, evaluate their experience and consult with other students. The seminar is designed to help solve problems confronting students as their projects unfold and to sharpen analytical and consulting skills.

Portsmouth Site
Section P1: Peter Smith
Section P2: Gerald Daley
Section P3: Sunny Bradford
Time: Fridays, September 12, October 3 & 31,
November 21 and December 12, 6:30 – 9:00 pm
Maximum: 8 per section
Credits: variable
(Practicum Seminar credited as part of Practicum)


OM 690
SIS: Supervised Independent Study

If you are planning an independent study, please register for an SIS on your registration form. However, an SIS contract must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office by December 1, 2003, in order for it to appear on your schedule or transcript. Please be sure to specify on the contract if the SIS will be used to fulfill a competency area or serve as a required course substitute, or as an elective. Contracts received after the December 1 deadline will be returned to you for registration in a subsequent semester (additional costs may apply). Credits will not appear on your schedule until the SIS contract(s) has been submitted to the Registrar’s Office, thus affecting your enrollment status and perhaps your financial aid eligibility.

Credits: variable


OMF 568
Topics in Finance

(formerly Financial Management II)
Competency Area: Financial Management
Prerequisite: OMF 561 Financial Management I or written permission of the instructor attached to or on registration form.

In this course students will continue to develop the vocabulary necessary for communicating effectively in a financial environment. In addition, a variety of accounting and financial processes and tools for decision-making will be presented. The student will be introduced to such topics as break-even analysis, relevant costs for decision-making, and capital budgeting decisions. A significant portion of the learning experience will utilize on-line technology through FirstClass. Problems and case studies will be presented in class and on-line.

Keene Site
Section K: James Dunphy
Portsmouth Site
Section P: Sandra Colliton
Time: Fridays, September 12, October 3 & 31,
November 21 and December 12, 4:00 – 6:00 pm
Maximum: 24 per section
Credits: 2


Department Workshops – Keene


OMD 638
Entrepreneurial Leadership

Competency Area: Self Development
Priority to 2nd year O&M students.

Entrepreneurial Leadership has been touted by many as one of the ways of leading successful organizations in the future. What are some of the strengths of the entrepreneurial leader? What are the weaknesses? What can we learn and apply from the entrepreneurial leadership to help lead organizations in an increasingly dynamic and volatile marketplace? What does it take to become an innovator/founder of a successful start up? Among the course objectives are to learn more about your own ability as an entrepreneurial leader and how to more effectively employ the benefits and minimize the pitfalls that entrepreneurial leadership provides. In this workshop we will examine the unique aspects of risk taking, stages of organizational development, leadership behaviors, and role that culture plays with entrepreneurial organizations. We will utilize case analysis and discussions and experiential methods to achieve the course objectives. Note: There will be reading assignments required prior to the course meeting that will be emailed to all students approximately 4 weeks prior to the class meeting.

Keene Site
Section K: Peter Smith
Time: Saturday & Sunday, October 18 & 19
9:00 am – 4:30 pm
Maximum: 14
Credits: 1


OMD 644
Ethics

Competency Area: Self Development
Priority to 2nd year O&M students.

This course explores important ethical issues that commonly arise in the management of organizations. Participants are provided with a systematic approach to assess real-life dilemmas and given practice in applying criteria to choose between alternative courses of action. Participants will learn how ethical decision-making can improve communication, resolve disagreements, and set just standards for employee relations. Students may do additional readings and discussions, field or research projects, or case study analysis on-line. Students should read the required text before the start of the first class, and also think of ethical issues or dilemmas they have experienced at work which can be explored in class exercises.

Keene Site
Section K: Hanns Meissner
Time: Saturday & Sunday, November 8 & 9
9:00 am – 4:30 pm
Maximum: 24
Credits: 1


OMS 530
Systems & Strategic Thinking

(formerly Grant Writing & Administration)
Competency Area: Financial Management
Priority to 2nd year O&M students.

Program design and grant writing are required competencies for the managers of today’s not-for-profit organizations. Too often both areas are approached in crisis mode with little planning or clarity about program goals and strategic directions. This course will provide an outline of concrete strategies for a planned and comprehensive approach to program design and preparation of a proposal. Students will practice by developing a real grant proposal. Students may do additional readings and discussions on-line. Students should check the course conference on FirstClass, for on-line assignments that may begin prior to the first class meeting.

Keene Site
Section K – Deborah Brown
Time: Fridays, September 12, October 3 & 31,
November 21 and December 12,
4:00 – 6:00 pm
Maximum: 24
Credits: 2


OMD 649
Self Knowledge for Leadership

Competency Area: Self Development
Priority to 2nd year O&M students.

Self-understanding and self-development are fundamental to effective leadership. The first aim of this course is to increase students’ self-awareness as leaders. Students develop a vision of themselves as leaders and reflect on ways in which they are and are not moving toward that vision. The second aim of the course is to provide students with a conceptual framework and strategy for altering dysfunctional behavior patterns which are blocking their full effectiveness as leaders. Each student will select one such behavioral pattern and will apply course concepts to clarify the pattern and to develop and implement a more effective response. Students should check the course conference on FirstClass, for on-line assignments that will begin prior to the first class meeting.

Keene Site
Section K: Donna Mellen
Time: Saturday & Sunday, December 6 & 7
9:00 am – 4:30 pm
Maximum: 24
Credits: 1


Department Workshops – Portsmouth


IDS 606
Effective Fundraising for Not-for-Profit Organizations

Competency Area: Financial Management
Priority to 2nd year O&M students.

This course provides students with a basic knowledge of the various components, strategies and management of an effective fundraising program. Discussion and research will center on the donor continuum, from donor acquisition and the first gift through the ultimate planned gift, placed in the theoretical context of donor focused, relational and social investment approaches to income development. Also within this framework, the course will explore corporate giving, cause-related marketing and the concept of one-to-one marketing as it relates to fundraising. Students will be expected to demonstrate their learning by completing a comprehensive fundraising plan with its underlying assumptions, for a specific program or organization of their choosing. Students will do additional readings and discussions, field or research projects, or case study analysis on-line. Students should check the course conference on FirstClass, for on-line assignments that may begin prior to the first class meeting.

Portsmouth Site
Section P: Michael Barndollar
Time: Fridays, September 12, October 3 & 31,
November 21 and December 12
4:00 – 6:00 pm
Maximum: 24
Credits: 2


IDS 605
Technology & the Culture of Work

Competency Area: Research & Information Design
Priority to 2nd year O&M students.

The overwhelming probability is that you have personally experienced the efficiency and convenience that is part of our high tech, knowledge-based culture — internet service, online research data bases, fax machines, cell phones, ultralite mountain bikes, and well-stocked supermarket shelves. You may also have experienced increased stress and time urgency, disempowerment, and attacks on your dignity — longer working hours, 24-hour availability, downsizing, the growing wealth gap, and stress related disease. Some believe in the utopian promise of technical culture, while others challenge that optimistic view citing contemporary evidence of massive displacement of workers, large scale degradation of the labor force, loss of privacy, and ever widening corporatization of life. This interdisciplinary course will explore the controversy surrounding the continuing technological expansion into the workplace, and its effect on the quality of life, looking at implications for managers, educators, clinicians, and environmentalists. Students will do preparatory readings and online discussions. Note: This course will begin with online discussion on September 28, 2003. Students will be expected to have begun selected readings prior to that date. Students may not add this course after September 19, 2003.

Portsmouth Site
Section P: William Griffith
Time: Saturday & Sunday, October 18 & 19
9:00 am – 4:30 pm
Maximum: 24
Credits: 1


OM 690
SIS: Supervised Independent Study

If you are planning an independent study, please register for an SIS on your registration form. However, an SIS contract must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office by December 1, 2003, in order for it to appear on your schedule or transcript. Please be sure to specify on the contract if the SIS will be used to fulfill a competency area or serve as a required course substitute, or as an elective. Contracts received after the December 1 deadline will be returned to you for registration in a subsequent semester (additional costs may apply). Credits will not appear on your schedule until the SIS contract(s) has been submitted to the Registrar’s Office, thus affecting your enrollment status and perhaps your financial aid eligibility.

Credits: variable