How Do You Know the Patient Is Getting Better?

Jim FauthA presentation and workshop, Beyond Training and Models: Improving Psychotherapy Practice with Clinical Feedback Systems, was held at Antioch University New England (AUNE) on November 10.

Dr. Jim Fauth, faculty member in the Department of Clinical Psychology and director of the Center for Research on Psychological Practice (CROPP) at AUNE, presented the free workshop. “Somewhat surprisingly, the single best way to improve the effectiveness of psychotherapy is not implementing an evidence-based form of treatment, getting supervision, obtaining advanced training or acquiring more experience,” Fauth said. “Rather, it is implementing a simple but systematic clinical feedback system that tells you whether or not your patients are getting better. We imagine, too, that mental health care systems as well as individual practitioners have much to learn from corrective feedback.”

“More and more insurance companies are demanding objective feedback systems. They want to know: How do you know the patient is getting better?” said Dr. Lorraine Mangione, director of practica in AUNE’s Department of Clinical Psychology.

Attendees learned about the rationale for clinical feedback systems and get practical information about selecting and tailoring the systems to their particular context. They learned how to think about and use them in supervision and teaching as well. The workshop was attended by practicum supervisors, faculty, alumni and colleagues interested in learning more about using clinical feedback systems in clinical practice.

Practicum supervisors oversee PsyD students, who as part of their academic work, undertake practica at hospitals, mental health clinics and other institutions during their second and third years at AUNE.

CROPP specializes in using practice-based participatory research to create health-care feedback and learning systems.

Watch the video

Download Dr. Fauth’s slides: BEYOND TRAINING AND MODELS: IMPROVING PRACTICE WITH CLINICAL FEEDBACK SYSTEMS (PDF 3256 KB)

Download Dr. Fauth’s references (PDF 17K)