All Speakers

Monadnock

The Alpine: Bellwether of Change

8th Northeast Alpine Stewardship Gathering

Sargent Center, Hancock, NH

November 1-3, 2013

Monadnock Ecological Research and Education


Chris Beltz, MS, Antioch University New EnglandChris Beltz, MS, Antioch University New England

Chris Beltz received his MS in Conservation Biology from Antioch University New England. His master’s thesis examined the effectiveness of several methods for restoring disturbed communities on Mt. Monadnock. Chris is currently a Fellow in the Chemistry & Chemical Biology Department at Harvard University and a Teaching Fellow through the Harvard Extension School. His research interests include the effects of climate change and land-use change on forest productivity. In particular, he hopes to examine the role of the soil microbiome in affecting nutrient cycling. Chris is currently applying to Ph.D. programs in ecology.


Alex DeLucia, Trails Volunteer Programs Manager, Appalachian Mountain ClubAlex DeLucia, Trails Volunteer Programs Manager, Appalachian Mountain Club

Alex has been working with the AMC’s Trails Volunteer Programs since 2001 and now oversees all trails volunteer efforts across the organization’s reach, from D.C to northern Maine. Many of these trails volunteer programs include work on alpine trail networks in NH and ME. Through his efforts working with AMC trail volunteer programming developing and managing sustainable recreational trails, especially in sensitive ecosystems, has remained a primary focus. Alex office is located at AMC Highland Center at Crawford Notch, NH.


Dr. Guillaume Fortin, Associate Professor & Assistant Director, Department of History & Geography, Université de MonctonDr. Guillaume Fortin, Associate Professor & Assistant Director, Department of History & Geography, Université de Moncton

Guillaume Fortin is an associate professor of physical geography at the Université de Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada. He earned a Ph.D. in water sciences from the Université du Québec (Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique ; Eau, Terre et Environnement), and has conducted his researches principally in Eastern Canada. Most of his research topics are related to snow science (including climate change and variability), climate-vegetation interactions, and watershed management. He is interested in mountain climate, and is working on a comparative study of the Chic-Chocs Mountains in Québec vs. French PreAlps to determine their sensitivity to climate change.


Dr. Daniel Germain, Professor, Université du Québec à MontréalDr. Daniel Germain, Professor, Université du Québec à Montréal

Daniel Germain (PhD) is a Professor of Geography at the University of Quebec in Montreal, Canada. His major research interests are in alpine geomorphology and the reconstruction of environmental change since the Little Ice Age. Over the last 10 years he has worked primarily in the Appalachians Mountains (Chic-Chocs, White Mountains, Gros-Morne) but also carried out research in northern Quebec, the Carpathians Mountains (Romania), Brazil and in the Andes (Chile). His geomorphic studies focus on the development of coarse debris landforms and associated geomorphic processes, mainly subaerial sediment-water flows, snow avalanches and rock glaciers. His approach is based on sedimentology, radiocarbon dates and tree rings analysis to reconstruct frequency-magnitude relationships of geomorphic processes.


Julia Goren on Mt MarcyJulia Goren, Summit Steward Coordinator, Adirondack High Peaks Summit Steward Program

Julia Goren is an avid hiker, an alpine plant enthusiast, and coordinator of the Adirondack High Peaks Summit Steward program. Julia has been with the Summit Steward program since 2006, first as Botany Steward and later as the program’s first full-time coordinator. She received her MS in Environmental Studies from Antioch University and her BA in Medieval History from Williams College. Julia serves on the board of the Waterman Alpine Stewardship Fund and considers herself supremely lucky to call the Adirondacks her home and the High Peaks her office.


Dr. Lawrence Hamilton, Senior Advisor, IUCN/World Commission on Protected AreasDr. Lawrence Hamilton, Senior AdvisorIUCN/World Commission on Protected Areas

Dr. Larry Hamilton of Vermont is a Professor Emeritus (Cornell University) and former Senior Fellow at the East West Center in Hawaii. He served as the Vice-Chair of the IUCN/WCPA Mountains Biome Theme from 1992 to 2004. Larry now devotes his time to volunteer work at local, state, and international levels. He has authored or co-authored 390 publications throughout his forest conservation teaching, research, and mountain protection careers.

Larry’s awards include Forest Conservationist of the Year (1969) from New York State Conservation Council; Environmental Achiever Award (1987) from Friends of UNEP; Packard International Parks Merit Award (2003) from IUCN World Commission on Protected Areas; Distinguished Scientist for Cloud Forest Conservation (2004) from University of Hawaii; and King Albert Gold Medal for Mountain Conservation Leadership (2004). He was named an Honorary Member of IUCN in 2008, the same year he was profiled by IUCN as one of the 20 global Earth Movers.

He and wife, Linda, live in rural Vermont. Since 1992 they have issued the quarterly Mountain Protected Areas UPDATE Newsletter for WCPA/IUCN.


Dr. Timothy Howard, Director of Science, New York Natural Heritage ProgramDr. Timothy Howard, Director of Science, New York Natural Heritage Program

Tim Howard spent much his earlier years hiking and climbing in the mountains of the Northeastern US. After studying Plant Ecology at the University of Michigan, he returned to the Northeast to first study the impacts of invasive species on ecological systems and then to support conservation of rare species and important natural communities at the New York Natural Heritage Program. In order to better understand natural systems and species dynamics in the Catskill and Adirondack Mountains he has been involved in natural community plot sampling, natural community mapping, and rare species inventories in these mountains.


Patrick Hummel, Volunteer Activities Coordinator, New Hampshire State ParksPatrick Hummel, Volunteer Activities Coordinator, New Hampshire State Parks

Patrick Hummel was the 8th Park Manager in Monadnock State Park’s 100-year history. In August he was promoted to his current position as Volunteer Activities Coordinator for New Hampshire State Parks. Patrick grew up in Jaffrey, NH ; in the shadow of Mount Monadnock ; establishing an ongoing fascination and relationship with the mountain since the age of 6. He enjoys hiking, kayaking, photography, baseball, and traveling. His recent move to Plymouth, NH placed him at the doorstep to the White Mountains.


Charlie Jacobi, Natural Resource Specialist/Visitor Use, Acadia National ParkCharlie Jacobi, Natural Resource Specialist/Visitor Use, Acadia National Park

Charlie Jacobi is a natural resource specialist at Acadia National Park whose focus is visitor use issues. He has worked for the National Park Service since 1982. His responsibilities include identifying and facilitating visitor impact and social science research, monitoring visitor use numbers and behaviors for the park, mitigating visitor impacts to natural and cultural resources, Leave No Trace education, and contributing to a variety of park planning efforts. He has worked on the development of park management plans for Isle au Haut, the carriage roads, rock climbing, hiking trails, and commercial services.


Mike JonesDr. Michael Jones, Biologist, Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit; President, Beyond Ktaadn; Co-author & Co-editor, Eastern Alpine Guide

Mike Jones is a biologist with the Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit and the president of Beyond Ktaadn, a nonprofit alpine conservation organization. He earned a Ph.D. in biology and wildlife conservation from the University of Massachusetts and has conducted endangered species research from Québec, northern Maine, and the White Mountains to the Everglades and Yucatán. Mike worked five winters and four summers in the AMC’s White Mountain Huts and serves on the board of the Waterman Fund. In 2012 Mike co-authored and co-edited Eastern Alpine Guide, a natural history of alpine tundra in eastern Canada and the northeastern U.S.


Dr. Stephen Jones, President, Antioch University New EnglandDr. Stephen Jones, President, Antioch University New England

Dr. Stephen B. Jones became president of Antioch University New England (AUNE) on July 1, after serving as president of Urbana University in Ohio for five years. Before that, he was chancellor at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, vice chancellor for extension and engagement at North Carolina State University, and director of the Alabama Cooperative Extension System at Auburn University. He also served at the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry and at Pennsylvania State University. He has written extensively on forestry and sustainability. Dr. Jones and his wife, Judy, live in West Chesterfield, New Hampshire.


Dr. Ken Kimball, Director of Research, Appalachian Mountain Club, Research DepartmentDr. Ken Kimball, Director of Research, Appalachian Mountain Club

Dr. Ken Kimball has been the research director for the Appalachian Mountain Club since 1983. He received his BS from Cornell University, MS from the University of Massachusetts, and PhD from the University of New Hampshire. Ken has worked as an environmental consultant, a research scientist at Cornell, and as a research scientist in Iran for the Smithsonian Institute-Peace Corps Environmental Program. Ken has explored numerous mountain ecosystems from the US, Iran, Nepal, Africa, to Central America. Ken oversees AMC’s research on alpine ecosystems, river protection, Northern Pass, and wind power siting in the northeast.


Chelsea Little, Masters Candidate, Swiss Federal Institute for Snow and Avalanche ResearchChelsea Little, Masters Candidate, Swiss Federal Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research

Chelsea Little grew up in New Hampshire and graduated from Dartmouth College in 2009 with a bachelor’s in biology, thanks to thesis work in the Colorado Rockies. After taking a few years off to live in the Northeast Kingdom, she is now a masters candidate in the Erasmus Mundus Masters Programme for Evolutionary Biology, a five-university consortium funded by the European Union. She spent the first summer in the Swiss Alps doing fieldwork for a thesis about the dwarf shrub Salix herbacea, while a second thesis next summer will look at community recovery from herbivory in Swedish Lapland.


Dr. Peter Palmiotto, Director Monadnock Ecological & Education (MERE) Project; Director, Conservation Biology, Antioch University New EnglandDr. Peter Palmiotto, Director Monadnock Ecological & Education (MERE) Project; Director, Conservation Biology, Antioch University New England

Peter A. Palmiotto Director of the MERE Project, is on the faculty at Antioch University New England where he directs the Conservation Biology Master’s degree concentration. He received his Doctorate of Forestry in Ecosystem Ecology from Yale University, School of Forestry and Environmental Studies in 1998. He studies the dynamics of forested and alpine ecosystems in the northeast.


Dr. Rick Paradis, President, The Waterman Fund; Director, Natural Areas Center, University of VermontDr. Rick Paradis, President, The Waterman Fund; Director, Natural Areas Center, University of Vermont

Rick Paradis is the Director of the University of Vermont Natural Areas Center and faculty member in the Environmental Program. He teaches courses in research methods, land conservation and stewardship, natural history, ecological restoration, conservation biology, and ecology. As Director of the Natural Ares Center, Rick oversees the administration and management of the University’s Natural Areas System and provides outreach services and professional development for those interested in the protection and management of natural areas and other conservation lands. His research is focused on the landscape histories and land conservation legacies of distinct mountain and arid ecosystems where he attempts to elucidate the relationship between ecology and culture and how this relationship has influenced both historical and contemporary conservation, stewardship, and restoration beliefs and practices. His field instruction and research has taken place around the New England landscape, the American Southwest, and the Highlands of Scotland.


John Peckham, Masters Candidate, Antioch University New EnglandJohn Peckham, Masters Candidate, Antioch University New England

John is originally from southern Vermont, and calls the Green Mountains home. He is interested in the relationship between wildlife and forest ecology, and is currently pursuing his M.S. in Conservation Biology. As part of his Master’s research, John is investigating the impact of snowshoe hare herbivory on the understory and regeneration layers in the spruce-fir zone of Mount Monadnock. He is excited to be a part of the MERE project, as it offers him the opportunity to explore his research interests in a setting he thoroughly enjoys.


Ph.D. Candidate, Rubenstein School of Environment & Natural Resources, University of VermontNathan Reigner, Ph.D. Candidate, Rubenstein School of Environment & Natural Resources, University of Vermont

Nathan Reigner is a PhD candidate in the Park Studies Lab at the University of Vermont. His research focuses on recreation and public land management. He has had the pleasure of working in a diverse range of parks including, Haleakala, Hawaii Volcanoes, Yosemite and Acadia National Parks, Alcatraz Island, and Muir Woods National Monument. Besides conducting research, Nathan teaches park and wilderness management and applied spatial analysis. He believes that recreation is most powerful activity individuals can engage in and that recreation in nature is the most intimate and direct way that most people engage with their environment.


Dr. Sean Robinson, Assistant Professor of Biology, SUNY ; OneontaDr. Sean Robinson, Assistant Professor of Biology, SUNY ; Oneonta

Sean Robinson is an Assistant Professor at SUNY College at Oneonta. He received is M.S. in Plant Ecology from SUNY-ESF and his Ph.D. in Biology from the University at Albany. His research is focused on understanding how mode of reproduction in plants, particularly bryophytes, affects colonization of new habitats, range expansions, and the exchange of alleles both within and between populations. Another component of his research is focused on vegetation dynamics on Adirondack alpine summits by continuing to monitor a series of permanent transects established on several peaks.


Author, AMC Field Guide to the New England Alpine SummitsDr. Nancy Slack, Plant Ecologist, Author, AMC Field Guide to the New England Alpine Summits

Nancy Slack is a plant ecologist with two degrees from Cornell University and a Ph.D. in Ecology from SUNY Albany. She was Professor of Biology at Russell Sage College, and currently teaches at the Eagle Hill Institute, Steuben, ME. She has published papers on bogs and fens; forest, bryophyte and alpine ecology; and history of ecology and botany. She is the author, together with photographer Allison Bell, of alpine field guides to the Adirondacks and New England, most recently the AMC Field Guide to the New England Alpine Summits (November, 2013). She is an Adirondack 46er and is currently doing research on alpine snowbed communities on Mt. Washington, NH.


Amy SeidlDr. Amy Seidl, Lecturer, Rubenstein School of Environment & Natural Resources, University of Vermont; Researcher; Author, Finding Higher Ground: Adaptation in the Age of Warming

Amy Seidl is currently a Lecturer in the Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources at the University of Vermont. Her scientific research has focused on a broad range of ecological and evolutionary questions including plant/insect dynamics, butterfly ecology, and the effect of global warming on alpine communities. Amy is the author of two books on climate change, Early Spring: Waking to a Warming World (2009), which won a Best Book award from the Association of Academic and University Publishers, and Finding Higher Ground: Adaptation in the Age of Warming (2011). Amy received her Masters in Entomology from Colorado State University and a Ph.D. in Biology from the University of Vermont. She lectures widely on the subject of climate change from ecological and human dimensions.


Bethany Taylor, Writer; 2011 Co-winner, The Waterman Fund Annual Alpine Essay ContestBethany Taylor, Writer; 2011 Co-winner, The Waterman Fund Annual Alpine Essay Contest

Bethany Taylor grew up in New Hampshire and spent many years working in the White Mountains. She received a MS in Environmental Writing from the University of Montana and returned home to New England to begin her freelance writing about granite hills, maple forests, and the Atlantic coastline. She currently works as a school librarian and landscaper in Cambridge, MA.


Kim Votta, Research Coordinator, Rey CenterKim Votta, Research Coordinator, Rey Center

Kim Votta has a B.S. in Environmental Studies and Communication from Granite State College and a M.S. in Environmental Science and Policy from Plymouth State University (PSU). Kim spent fourteen years in nonprofit finance and management before transitioning into a new career in environmental research and education. In June 2008, when Kim was a PSU graduate student, she joined the Rey Center as its research assistant and became Research Coordinator in July 2009.


Laura Waterman, Founder, The Waterman Fund; Author, Wilderness EthicsLaura Waterman, Founder, The Waterman Fund; Co-author, Backwood Ethics and Wilderness Ethics

Laura was married to Guy for nearly 30 years. They undertook the trail maintenance and stewardship of the Franconia Ridge in New Hampshire’s White Mountains in 1980. It was through this work of nearly two decades that they formed a close attachment to the Alpine areas of the Northeast, which became central in their lives and in their writing. The books they wrote together on the mountain history and environmental issues of the Northeast include Backwood Ethics and Wilderness Ethics. Laura now resides in East Corinth, Vermont.


Doug Weihrauch, Staff Ecologist, Appalachian Mountain Club, Research DepartmentDoug Weihrauch, Staff Ecologist, Appalachian Mountain Club

Doug Weihrauch has been Staff Ecologist with the Appalachian Mountain Club for 15 years, with a focus on Northeastern alpine plants and ecosystems. He was involved in the successful recovery of the previously federally endangered endemic dwarf cinquefoil (Potentilla robbinsiana), and monitors the impacts on vegetation and rare plant populations near the AMC’s backcountry facilities. He is co-creator of the citizen-science Mountain Watch flower phenology program. He has mapped alpine plant communities within the largest areas above treeline in the Northeast, and is interested in better understanding the climatic, topographic, and other factors that drive their current and future distribution.


Jill Weiss, Ph.D. Candidate, Antioch University New EnglandJill Weiss, Ph.D. Candidate, Antioch University New England

After a career in environmental education and grassroots organizational capacity building, Jill is completing her PhD research on the application of communication theories to regional conservation networks and ecological stewardship. The dissertation will explore the path of knowledge sharing and collaboration in landscape scale, regional conservation networks in New England. In 2011 she researched and presented the report, Sharing Out: Alpine Stewardship Programs in the Northeast, a survey of field education, passive and active management, and research atop the peaks of the Northeast. The report will be updated at this Gathering.


Michael Wejchert, Writer; Climbing Guide, International Mountain Equipment; 2013 Winner, The Waterman Fund Annual Alpine Essay ContestMichael Wejchert, Writer; Climbing Guide, International Mountain Equipment; 2013 Winner, The Waterman Fund Annual Alpine Essay Contest

Michael finds Northern New England the perfect place to train for his yearly climbing expeditions: Alaska, Patagonia, Peru, the Canadian Rockies, and Newfoundland, to name a few. He has worked as climbing guide, a carpenter in the AMC’s White Mountain hut system, and a writer. Michael currently resides in a renovated shed with heat, but no running water, in Vermont’s Addison County. He loves dogs.


Liz WilleyDr. Liz Willey, Biologist, University of Massachusetts ; Amherst; Co-founder, Beyond Ktaadn; Co-author & Co-editor, Eastern Alpine Guide

Liz Willey is a biologist at the University of Massachusetts Amherst where she studies rare ecosystems and wildlife from Canada to Mexico. With Mike Jones and others, she co-authored and co-edited the Eastern Alpine Guide (www.easternalpine.org) and co-founded Beyond Ktaadn (www.beyondktaadn.org), a non-profit organization dedicated to the conservation of alpine biodiversity in eastern North America. Over the past 15 years, she has worked throughout the eastern mountains, studying their weather, wetlands, and wildlife. Liz holds an engineering degree from MIT and a Ph.D. in Biology and Wildlife & Fisheries Conservation from the University of Massachusetts.


Christine Woodside, Editor-in-Chief, Appalachia Journal Christine Woodside, Editor-in-Chief, Appalachia Journal

Christine Woodside writes about mountains, climate change, and society. She is the editor of Appalachia journal. Currently, Christine is working on a book about the libertarian roots of the Little House books by Laura Ingalls Wilder. She has been freelancing for 13 years from the lower Connecticut River Valley. Visit her at www.chriswoodside.com.


Paul Wylezol, Chairperson, International Appalachian TrailPaul Wylezol, Chairperson, International Appalachian Trail

Paul is a McGill University graduate (Honours Philosophy) who is Chairperson of the International Appalachian Trail (IAT), which extends across the North Atlantic to 17 countries. In 2009 as Chairperson of the International Appalachian Trail Newfoundland & Labrador (IATNL), he negotiated five Special Managements Areas in the Western Newfoundland woodlands managed by Corner Brook Pulp and Paper Ltd, where he is employed. He also owns and operates a beachfront inn and guiding business near Gros Morne National Park on Newfoundland’s Great Northern Peninsula. He is currently planning the creation of a Global Geopark spanning the four ophiolites of Western Newfoundland and evaluating the establishment of an International Appalachian Geoparks program for the IAT.