Susan E Hawes (PhD)

Professor and Director of Accountability Research
Department of Clinical Psychology
Director of Assessment Training and Contracts
Psychological Services Center

Course Syllabi

Susan Hawes, PhD: Course Syllabi

PY 702 HISTORICAL AND SOCIAL CONTEXT OF PSYCHOLOGY

COURSE SYLLABUS

Summer 2006

Mondays: 2:30 to 6:45 pm

Course Overview

The goal of this course is to explore the field of Psychology in several of its historical and social contexts in order to encourage and expand the critical awareness and reflexive breadth of professional psychologists. By no means a survey of progressive scientific "discoveries" or patriarchal texts of white forefathers and their seminal ideas leading up to the current pinnacles of psychological science, the course is based upon the view that the field of Psychology consists of a set of varied, often conflicting social practices, potentiated and limited by structures of history, culture and discourse. Further, since Psychology is a peculiarly western phenomenon, the course will predominantly consider the milieus of Western European and American histories, although other cultures will be introduced as foils to psychological science's attempts at universality. We will be considering our field and ourselves as psychologists in ways that identify the presence of implicit and explicit, coherent and conflicting social interests and social effects. Readings will predominantly draw on writings from within the history of Psychology, while lectures will draw upon essays from culture studies, critical psychology, the humanities, sociology, and political science.

Participation

The course process will be a combination of lectures on information not covered in the course readings, and classroom discussions. The latter will utilize both large and small group venues, so that everyone's style of participation will be supported. Discussions will focus on the required readings and their conjunction with other ideas introduced in the lectures. Students are expected to come to each class having completed all the required readings for that day. Participation in the discussion is a major part of this course, and will be weighted as strongly as the documentation requirements.

Documentation

There is one documentation requirement. Each week (#2-#5), students are required to write a 2-3 page double-spaced essay/discussion of an issue that must in some way draw upon all the required readings for that week. All essays should be posted to our course conference by the Sunday evening prior Monday's class. Students may be asked to talk about what they wrote during class time, and should bring a copy of their essay with them to class. For our sixth class meeting, students will compose the following to be read aloud: 1. A toast to an individual or group from the past in recognition for their contribution to the field of psychology and for their inspiration to the toast's author. 2. A warning or cautionary statement to psychologists in the present based upon the author's learning in this course.

Required Texts (2)

Cushman, Philip (1995). Constructing the self, constructing America: A cultural history of psychotherapy. Boston: Addison-Wesley.

Jansz, Jeroen & van Drunen, Peter (Eds.) (2004). A social history of psychology. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, Ltd.

Required Articles

Hook, Derek (2005). A critical psychology of the postcolonial. Theory & Psychology, 15(4), 475-503.

Keller, Richard (2001). Madness and Colonization: Psychiatry in the British and French Empires, 1800-1962. Journal of Social History, 35(2), 295-326. Retrieved 5/5/06 http://journals.ohiolink.edu:6873/journals/journal_of_social_history/v035/35.2keller.html

Schwartz, Sally (2005). Can the clinical subject speak? Some thoughts on subaltern psychology. Theory & Psychology, 15(4), 505-525.

Class

Lecture/Discussion Themes

Required Readings

1

  • Why study history?
  • Why a social history of psychology?
  • The Measurers
Jansz & van DrunenIntroduction1. Psychology and society: An overview2. Child-rearing and education

Cushman

Appendix: The Self in Western Society

2

  • History of the visualization of madness
  • Madness & society: The disciplining of subjects
Jansz & van Drunen3. Madness and mental health6. Delinquency and lawCushman

1. Psychotherapy: The impossible bridge

2. Selves, illnesses, healers, technologies: The Self in America

3

  • Imperialism and colonization
  • Eugenics
Hook, A critical psychology of the postcolonialKeller, Madness and Colonization: Psychiatry in the British and French Empires, 1800-1962Swartz, Can the clinical subject speak?Jansz & van Drunen

5. Culture & ethnicity

4

  • Interfaces of "Pseudo-sciences" and Psychology
  • Psychology and management of the masses
Cushman4. Healing through Self-domination5. Healing through Self-liberationJansz & van Drunen

4. Work and organization

7. Social Orientations

5

  • The Professionalization of Psychology
  • Psychology and War
  • Consuming Psychology
Cushman6. Strange Bedfellows7. The Road Not Taken8. Self-liberation through consumerism

9. Psychotherapy as moral discourse

6

  • Psychology and Politics
  • Toasts & Cautions Course Evaluation
Cushman9. Psychotherapy as moral discourse10. The Politics of the SelfJansz & van Drunen

Epilogue

 


PY 871 RESEARCH METHODS & STATISTICS I

COURSE SYLLABUS Fall 2005

Mondays: 9:00 to 11:30 a.m.

COURSE OVERVIEW

This course begins the introductory survey of methods of inquiry in psychology (continued next semester in Methods of Research and Statistics II) This term, following an introduction to philosophy of science, you will be introduced to research methodologies based in the "human science" tradition. Postponing Empiricism and Postpositivism until next term, we will consider methodologies from Interpretive/Constructivist and Emancipatory paradigms. These are: ethnography, hermeneutics, narrative analysis, discourse analysis, and participatory action research. These methodologies, along with their related "technologies" share goals endorsed by all contemporary research paradigms, specifically the (1) systematic search for knowledge or understanding, (2) reduction in the interests of conceptual clarity, (3) utility, and (4) parsimony. Yet, they diverge dramatically from Postpositivist methodologies by embracing: exploration and discovery, complex systems, the foregrounding of language and "meaning" in human systems of knowledge, diversity and social interaction, and those human phenomena that lose their humanity in the attempts to operationalize or transform them into quantities.

OBJECTIVES OF THE COURSE

By the end of the course, you should have: a general understanding of qualitative research methods and the beginnings of a draft for a possible qualitative dissertation proposal.

METHODS

This is a lively, participatory, and very demanding course, much like its subject. The course will attempt a critical pedagogy, one which encourages students to become authors of both their experience in the course and of a work of scholarship. Students' development of working research designs in an area of their interest will take place through multiple dialogues with the both the instructor and peers in one-to-one, small group, & large group formats. The course utilizes electronic communication on First Class (FC) and access to qualitative resources located on the World Wide Web. Our course's First Class Conference will be used as a forum in which to present information and ideas, to post the development of individual research design projects, and to get feedback from both the instructor and peers on works in progress. Link to this course's Qualitative Research Web Site, a collection of qualitative resources which can be found on the Internet: http://www.antiochne.edu/faculty/shawes/Qualres.html

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

  1. Each student will write a critique of a published qualitative research article.
    • He or she will choose and then read one from a list provided by the instructor.
    • He or she will write a brief summary of the article and write a criticism of its research design.
    • This is to be posted to the FC Course Conference as an attachment no later than Class #9.
    • As should be the case with all written work here, the critique should be in APA Style.
  2. Each student will develop a working research design for a specific qualitative inquiry on a question of his or her interest.
    • The instructor & peers will act as consultants to them by means of postings to the course FC Conference and in class discussions.
    • Working student groups will be formed by random assignment during the 3rd class.
    • The order and due-date for postings can be found in the Course Calendar (below).
    • The Complete Version of this design is to be posted as an attachment to the FC Conference by Class #14. It should be in APA Style.
  3. Each student will write a self-evaluation of their own learning in the course, and present it to their small working peer group in council. A written version will be handed in to the instructor on Class #15.

STUDENT EVALUATION

The instructor will incorporate students' self-evaluations into her formal departmental evaluations of them. Students' work will be evaluated on the quality of their (1) research critique (30%), (2) their research design project (40%), and (3) participation in classroom discussions (30%).

REQUIRED TEXTS

Crotty, Michael. (1998). The foundations of social research: meaning and perspective in the research process. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Locke, Lawrence F., Spirduso, Waneen, W., & Silverman, Stephen J. (1999). Proposals That Work: A Guide for Planning Dissertations and Grant Proposals (4th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Mertens, Donna M. (2004). Research Methods in Education and Psychology: Integrating diversity with quantitative and qualitative approaches, Second Edition. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Smith, Jonathan A. (2003). Qualitative psychology: A practical guide to research methods. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Required Texts from Library E-Reserve

Denzin, Norman K. & Lincoln, Yvonna S. (Eds.) (2003) Collecting and interpreting qualitative materials, second edition. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. (e-book)

Greenwood, D. J. & Levin, M. (1998). Introduction to Action research: Social research for social change. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. (e-book)

Rubin, Herbert & Rubin, Irene (1995). Qualitative Interviewing: The Art of Hearing Data. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. (e-book)

Required Articles (down-loadable on PDF in Course Folder Reserve)

Attride-Stirling, Jennifer (2001). Thematic networks: An analysis tool for qualitative research. Qualitative Research, 1(3), 385-405.

Campbell, Rebecca; Wasco, Sharon M. (2000). Feminist Approaches to Social Science: Epistemological and Methodological Tenets.American Journal of Community Psychology, 28 (6), pp. 773-791.

Mitchell, Joel (2004). The place of qualitative research in psychology. Qualitative Research in Psychology, 1, 307-319.

Orbe, Mark P. (2000). Centralizing diverse racial/ethnic voices in scholarly research: the value of phenomenological inquiry. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, pp. 603-621.

Ristock, Janice L. (2003). Exploring Dynamics of Abusive Lesbian Relationships: Preliminary Analysis of a Multisite, Qualitative Study.American Journal of Community Psychology, 31 (3-4), pp. 329-341.

Ryan, Gery W. & Bernard, H. Russell (2003). Techniques to identity themes. Field Methods, 15(1), 85-109.

Stein, Catherine H.; Mankowski, Eric S. (2004. Asking, witnessing, interpreting, knowing: Conducting qualitative research in community psychology. American Journal of Community Psychology. 33 (1-2) pp. 21-35.

Vincent, Carol & Warren, Simon (2001). "This won't take long…": Interviewing, ethics and diversity. Qualitative Studies in Education, 14, 1, 39-53.

Strongly Recommended for Dissertations

Creswell, John W. (2002). Research Design: Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Methods Approaches, Second Edition. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. (e-book)

Denzin, N. K., & Lincoln, Y. S. (2003). Strategies of qualitative inquiry. (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. (e-book)

Denzin, N. K., & Lincoln, Y. S. (2003). The landscape of qualitative research: theories and issues. (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Sage. (e-book)

Fetterman, David M. (2001). Foundations of empowerment evaluation. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Holliday, Adrian (2002). Doing and Writing Qualitative Research. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Krueger, R. A., & Casey, M. A. (2000). Focus groups: a practical guide for applied research. (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Sage Publications. (e-book)

Lieblich, A., Tuval-Mashiach, R., & Zilber, T. (1998). Narrative research: Reading, analysis, and interpretation. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Mason, Jennifer (2002). Qualitative Researching. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Patton, Michael Quinn (2002). Qualitative research and evaluation methods, third edition. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Piantanida, Maria, & Garman, Noreen (1999) The qualitative dissertation: A guide for students and faculty. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press, Inc.

Rossi, Peter H., Freeman, Howard E. & Lipsey, Mark W. (1998). Evaluation: A systematic approach. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. (e-book)

Strauss, A. L., & Corbin, J. M. (1998). Basics of qualitative research: techniques and procedures for developing grounded theory. (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications. (e-book)

Wood, L. A., & Kroger, R. O. (2000). Doing Discourse analysis: Methods for studying action in talk and text. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

 

COURSE SCHEDULE

Class: Topics Required Readings In Class Assignments
Class # 1Beginnings Mertens1. Introduction to ResearchCrotty1. Introduction: The research process

Mitchell, Joel (2004). The place of qualitative research in psychology.Qualitative Research in Psychology, 1, 307-319

Course OverviewCritical PedagogyGroup & Individual Goal-setting & responsibilitiesWhat is Science Slides
Class # 2BeginningsOverview of Philosophy of ScienceWhat is Qualitative Research? Crotty2. Positivism: The march of science3. Constructionism: The making of meaning4. Interpretivism: For and against culture

5. Interpretivism: The way of hermeneutics

6. Critical inquiry: the Marxist heritage

7. Critical inquiry: Contemporary critics & contemporary critique

8. Feminism: Re-visioning the man-made world

9. Postmodernism: crisis of confidence or moment of truth?

  • Small Groups: Discuss Chapters from Crotty
  • Large Group:
    • Reflections
    • What can be studied using Qualitative Methods
Bring: One question from each chapter of Crotty text to Small group discussion
Class # 3More Philosophy of ScienceWhat is Qualitative Research?What is a Qualitative Research Question? Mertens3. Literature Review and Research ProblemsDenzin & Lincoln1: Introduction: The discipline and practice of qualitative research
  • Slides on Paradigms
  • Introduction to doing council in small groups
  • Small Group council on research interests
Post: the first draft of a research interest areas
Class #4Qualitative DesignWhat is a research proposal?Logic of Qualitative Design Locke, Spirduso & Silverman1. The function of the proposal4. Content of the proposal: Important considerations5. Preparation of proposals for qualitative research: Different assumptions

Mertens

Appendix: Writing the Research Proposal

  • Small Groups Read & Find the Research Question(s) in samples of qualitative publications
  • Large Group Questions
  • Slides on Logic of Designing Qualitative Inquiry
  • Slides on Elements of a proposal
Post: the first draft of a research questionBegin: Literature Search for Research Question and Building a Bibliography
Class #5Creating a Conceptual FrameworkCritical & Emancipatory InquiryIntegrating Cultural Diversity & Social Justice Orbe, Mark P. (2000). Centralizing diverse racial/ethnic voices in scholarly research: the value of phenomenological inquiry.International Journal of Intercultural Relations, pp. 603-621.Stein, Catherine H.; Mankowski, Eric S. (2004). Asking, witnessing, interpreting, knowing: Conducting qualitative research in community psychology. American Journal of Community Psychology. 33 (1-2) pp. 21-35.Campbell, Rebecca; Wasco, Sharon M. (2000). Feminist Approaches to Social Science: Epistemological and Methodological Tenets. American Journal of Community Psychology, 28 (6), pp. 773-791.Ristock, Janice L. (2003). Exploring Dynamics of Abusive Lesbian Relationships: Preliminary Analysis of a Multisite, Qualitative Study. American Journal of Community Psychology, 31 (3-4), pp. 329-341.
  • Slides & samples on Conceptual Framework
  • Small Groups: Find the Conceptual Framework in sample articles
  • Large group Brief reports from small groups
  • Large group discuss Assigned articles
Post: A revised draft of the research question.Describe the ontology & epistemology of the question. identify & read an article for critique assignment
Class #6Qualitative MethodologiesGrounded ResearchEthnography

Phenomenology Interpretation

Mertens8. Qualitative MethodsSmith3 Giorgi, Amedeo & Giorgi, Barbro, Phenomenology

4 Smith, Jonathan & Osborn, Mike, Interpretive phenomenological analysis

5 Charmaz, Kathy, Grounded theory

  • Small Groups Apply Methodologies to sample
  • Large Group Reports from small groups
  • Large Group discussion of readings
Post: Revised description of the ontology & epistemology of the question.First draft of conceptual framework for research question.
Class #7Narrative & BiographySocial Relations in LanguageDiscourse Analysis Mertens9. History & Narrative study of livesSmith6 Murray, Michael, Narrative psychology

7 Drew, Paul, Conversation analysis

8 Willig, Carla, Discourse analysis

  • Small Groups Presentations on Methodologies using articles
  • Large group discuss small group results
Post: Revised research question & conceptual framework.
Class #8Action Research Greenwood & Levin2. Introduction: Action research, diversity & democracy4. An epistemological foundation for action research5. Local knowledge, cogenerative research, and narrativity

9. Pragmatic action research

  • Large group reviews pedagogy & make changes
  • Large group disscussionof action research
  • Introduction to the IRB Process
Post: Working Research Bibliography
Class #9Participatory-Action ResearchEvaluation Research Greenwood & Levin9. Empowerment and liberation10. Human inquiry, cooperative inquiry, & action inquirySmith

10. Reason, Peter, Cooperative Inquiry

  • Small groups Create an imagninary participatory action research or focus groups project
  • Large group-Present small group projects & discuss
Post: Critique of Research Article in APA Style
Class #10Evaluation Research Mertens2. EvaluationDenzin & Lincoln16. Greene, Jennifer C., Understanding social programs through evaluation

Smith

9. Wilkinson, Sue, Focus Groups

  • Lecture/Slides on Evaluation Research
  • Program Evaluation
  • Small groups
Post: First draft of methodological implications of research question.
Class #11Qualitative MethodsSamplingesearch Ethics-Use of Human Subjects Locke, Spiroduso & Silverman2 Doing the right thing: "The habit of truth"Mertens11. Sampling: Definition, Selection, and Ethics

Smith

11 Smith, Jonathan, Validity and qualitative psychology

Vincent & Warren (2001). "This won't take long…": interviewing, ethics and diversity. Qualitative Studies in Education, 14, 1, 39-53.

  • Lecture/slides on Sampling
  • Large group discussion on dynamics and tensions between 'good' qualitative research & research ethics
  • Small groups
Post: Revised draft of methodological implications of research question.
Class #12Data Collection Mertens13. Data CollectionRubin & Rubin6. The responsive interview as extended conversation

7. Structuring the interview

8. Designing the main questions and probes

  • Lecture/Slides on Interviewing
  • Small groups-members consult on data collection procedures
  • Large group-discuss small group discoveries
Post: Revised draft of proposed sampling & data collection procedures. First draft of proposed data analyses.
Class #13Data Analyses Mertens13. Data Analysis , Interpretation, and ReportingAttride-Stirling, Jennifer (2001). Thematic networks: An analysis tool for qualitative research. Qualitative Research, 1(3), 385-405.Ryan, Gery W. & Bernard, H. Russell(2003). Techniques to identity themes. Field Methods, 15(1), 85-109.
  • Lecture/Slides on Data Displays & Matrices
  • Thematic Analysis
  • Exercise using stories from: Carroll, Rebecca (1997). Sugar in the Raw : Voices of Young Black Girls in America. New York: Three Rivers Press.
Post: Revised draft of proposed data analyses.
Class #14Data Anayses Denzin & Lincoln7. Ryan, G. W. & Bernard, H. R., Data management and analysis methods8. Weitzman, E. A., Software and qualitative research
  • Demonstration of textual analysis using N-Vivo software
  • Small groups
Post: Draft of Proposal
Class #15Conclusion No readings required. Large group--Closure Post: Final version of Proposal in APA Style Hand in self-evaluation at the end of class