Self-efficacy in residential treatment of homeless dually diagnosed mothers

Maxine Andrea Orocofsky (1999)

This exploratory study of the treatment experience of two dually diagnosed homeless mothers focused upon the possible role of self-efficacy, connection to program, and the client's stage in the behavioral change process as elements which affected the course of treatment. The treatment experiences of two women, one who successfully completed the program, and one who did not, were examined utilizing the case study method. The findings suggested client self-efficacy as a central factor in treatment outcome, and additionally pointed to a complex recursive interplay between self-efficacy, connection to program, and the client's stage of behavioral change. A fit early in treatment between program demands and client's capacities seemed to also influence the treatment process and outcome.