CROPP Current Projects

CROPP is committed to improving mental health and wellness services for underserved populations through program development, selection, and implementation consultation, as well as practice-based participatory research. In essence, CROPP helps mental health care agencies learn about and improve their services via systematic data-based feedback loops. CROPP’s practice-based participatory research model entails true collaboration with practice sites in discovering high leverage learning opportunities and feasible yet rigorous research and evaluation strategies.

Below is a list of current CROPP projects and products.

Cheshire Medical Center/Dartmouth Hitchcock Keene Healthy Monadnock 2020
PSC Therapeutic Responsiveness Training Project
NH System of Care Program Evaluation
UMass Lowell Connect Project
NH Nexus Project: Creating Community Connections to Prevent Youth
Suicide


NH Nexus Project: Creating Community Connections to Prevent Youth
Suicide

October 2013 ; Sept 2016

DESCRIPTION: Building on NH’s previous statewide suicide prevention grants (2005 2008, and 2010-2013), NAMI NH assembled a team of partners to submit another application under the federal Garrett Lee Smith/Youth Suicide Prevention program. Whereas New Hampshire’s previous efforts have employed primarily universal prevention strategies, this effort also targets nodes in the community where suicide risk concentrates. Initiatives funded by this grant include enhanced discharge planning and  coordination of community-based care for youth being discharged from the State psychiatric hospital, greater follow-up with callers to the suicide prevention hotline, and intensive work with three regional public health networks to address the needs of high risk youth. CROPP assisted in the preparation of this grant application and, as the contracted evaluator for the project, will help to measure processes and outcomes of these interventions, and feed that information back to support practice improvement.

PROJECT PARTNERS: NAMI NHNew Hampshire Hospital, regional public health networks in Manchester, Concord, and the Lakes RegionHeadrest

FUNDING: $131K NAMI NH ; 3 year contract


NH System of Care Program Evaluation

July 2013 – present

DESCRIPTION: The NH Fast Forward project is a four-year pilot to develop and implement a system of care for children with serious emotional disturbance and their families. This youth and family-centered system of care intends to improve clinical and functional outcomes by using wraparound service planning, developmentally appropriate and evidence-informed services, and integrated care management. These improvements will help prevent unnecessary placements in residential care settings. CROPP assisted the State of New Hampshire in the preparation of the federal grant application for this project, resulting in a 4 million dollar award to instantiate this new system of care.

CROPP was awarded a contract ($172K) by the State of NH to serve as evaluators for this project.

The CROPP evaluation team for the project consists of CROPP’s director, Dr. James Fauth, and Dr. George Tremblay, a half-time project manager (Johanna Wilson-White), and several doctoral-student research assistants. The CROPP team will evaluate critical project infrastructure, performance, and outcome indicators on an ongoing basis, and feed that information back to stakeholders to learn about and improve this project over time.

PROJECT PARTNERS: NH DHHSUNH Institute on DisabilityNAMI NH, and Granite State Federation of Families for Children’s Mental Health.

FUNDING: 690K 4 year contract


UMass Lowell Connect Project

August 2012 ; July 2015

DESCRIPTION: In yet another suicide prevention initiative funded by the federal Garrett Lee Smith/Youth Suicide Prevention program, the University of Massachusetts ; Lowell (UML) is implementing NAMI NH’s Connect gatekeeper training to help UMass staff, students, and faculty recognize and respond effectively to signs of suicide risk. UML is also engaged in a variety of awareness and education campaigns, and shaping campus policies to support at-risk students. CROPP helped to write this grant application, and became the contracted evaluator when it was funded. In our evaluator role,  CROPP supports strategic planning to achieve grant objectives, monitors progress toward the intended outcomes, and engages project stakeholders in reflecting on and learning from their data and experience.

PROJECT PARTNERS: UMass ; Lowell, NAMI NH

FUNDING: $59K UMass Lowell ; 3 year contract


Cheshire Medical Center/Dartmouth Hitchcock Keene Healthy Monadnock 2020

January 2009;present
DESCRIPTION: Initiated by Cheshire Medical Center/Dartmouth-Hitchcock Keene, this project aims “to make the Keene area the healthiest community in the country by 2020.” Antioch has been contracted to develop and conduct ongoing evaluation of this initiative. CROPP faculty consult with Anne Nordstrom, the primary evaluator on the project.
PROJECT PARTNERS: Cheshire Medical Center/Dartmouth-Hitchcock Keene


PSC Therapeutic Responsiveness Training Project

September 2002;present

DESCRIPTION: Since Fall 2002, CROPP, with the support of the PSC’s director (Victor Pantesco, EdD) and associate director (George Tremblay, PhD), helped initiate the incorporation of the Outcome Questionnaire-45 (OQ-45), a widely utilized outcome measure, into the PSC’s daily clinical practice. The OQ-45 is now given to clients every other session to aid in tracking clinical progress.

The OQ-45 requires only 5-10 minutes to complete, yet yields helpful information about clients’ general level of distress. Using a system originally designed with the help of Greg Gard PsyD, one of our graduates (Greg worked with the original director of CROPP, Dr. Gene Pekarik), the OQ-45 is administered electronically using either a palm pilot or computer, thereby eliminating the need for manual entry or scoring of OQ-45 data. Best of all, this method of administration and scoring yields real-time, clinically pragmatic reports that summarizes the OQ-45 data and tracks each client’s progress over time, which has been shown to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of psychotherapy (e.g., Lambert, Whipple, Smart, & Vermeersch, 2001).

PROJECT PARTNERS: Psychological Services Center