Course Descriptions


PY 898 Advanced Practicum

3 credits
An optional practicum for Year IV students wishing to have extensive further clinical training for more than 12 hours per week, with a minimum of 300 hours per semester.

PY 816E Advanced Psychological Assessment
1 credit
(Weekend Course) While this is not a class on psychometrics, test scatter, test interpretation, or test administration, certain interpretation strategies are explored. This course explores the meaning of clinical inference as it relates to the assessment enterprise. Psychological assessment is the development of diagnostic meaning from a person’s history, clinical interviews, records, interviews with significant others, and psychological tests. The ability to obtain, shape, integrate, and ultimately export meaningful information about an individual is the basis of psychological assessment. To model the idea of test-buttressed clinical opinions combined with other data, two main test instruments are employed: the Wechsler scales and the Rorschach.

PYC 716 Advanced Seminar: Advanced Projective Testing
3 credits
This course is meant for those students familiar with basic Rorschach who wish to gain more skill in using projective tests. Emphasis will be placed on the Exner Rorschach, with some attention also to the TAT and to coordinating data from projective tests with other data (such as from the Wechsler tests). Areas covered will include advanced scoring issues, interpretation of actual clinical protocols, and learning to present test data in useful language. The use of the Rorschach to address real world concerns, such as treatment planning, trauma, and forensic questions will also be addressed.

PY 856A Advanced Seminar: Aftermath and Treatment of Trauma
3 credits
The psychological sequelae of traumatic events and their resolution will be the focus of this course. This will be illustrated using a four-stage model: victimization, aftermath, integration, and full recovery. Specific trauma-related disorders will be covered, including simple and complex PTSD. The trauma literature will be examined through a psychohistorical lens.

PYC 717 Advanced Seminar: Assessment and Treatment of Couples
3 credits
This course surveys the predominant approaches to couple/marital therapy as well as the body of empirical findings on successful relationships that have implications for treatment. Modifications of couple therapy to address specific problems such as depression, alcoholism, and sexual dysfunction will be considered. In addition, special issues relevant to couple therapy, including assessment, parenting, infidelity and forgiveness, separation/divorce, domestic violence, and working with diversity will be covered.

PY 820B Advanced Seminar: Brief Psychotherapy
3 credits
This course covers a broad base of information about the rationale, theory, practice, and research of brief therapy. Because the practice of brief therapy has been derived from pragmatic, humanitarian, and research-based rationales, this literature is reviewed before discussing theory and technique. The course then surveys multicultural, psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral, solution focused, and integrative ideas about brief therapy. During the course, transtheoretical (e.g., common factors of brief therapy) and contextual issues that cut across the approaches are identified and discussed. Finally, the course focuses on developing students’ personal approaches to brief therapy.

PY 740B Advanced Seminar: Clinical Child Psychology – Psychopathology and Assessment
3 credits
This course examines psychopathology from infancy through early adolescence. The paradigm of developmental psychopathology, or articulating the role of time and change in childhood disturbances, is an important focus of the class. Using this frame, the following areas are examined: clinical assessment of psychosocial problems in childhood; diagnostic systems for conceptualizing childhood psychopathology; and understanding disturbances of childhood through the lenses of intrapsychic, interpersonal, and the historical context. While students doing child and family therapy are encouraged to consider this class, those without a child or adolescent in their caseload may participate.

PYB 711 Advanced Seminar: Clinical Neuropsychology
3 credits
This seminar examines the structure and function of the central nervous system, brain-behavior relationships, and neuropathology. Seminar content focuses on evaluation techniques for diagnosis of brain dysfunction including visual, auditory, memory, and language processes. Application of these techniques to the development of remedial strategies for learning disabilities and adult dysfunctions is addressed.

PYB 710 Advanced Seminar: Clinical Psychopharmacology
3 credits
This course is designed to provide an in-depth survey of current theory and practice of clinical psychopharmacology. We begin in this course with the principles of pharmacology, which consist of pharmacokinetics (the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination of drugs) and pharmacodynamics (drug-receptor interactions). After study of the principles of pharmacology, the class will review individual classes of drugs, including antidepressants, antipsychotics, anti-anxiety agents, drugs for the treatment of movement disorders, and drugs for the treatment of cognitive disorders in the elderly. For each drug class, the basic biology of the disorder and the mechanisms of drug action are discussed, followed by a review of current clinical practice and potential new drugs. Other topics in the drug literature are addressed, including the use of medication with different age groups, sources of drug information, the FDA drug review process, drug-drug interactions, and pharmacoepidemiology.

PYC 706 Advanced Seminar: Cognitive-Behavior Therapy
3 credits
This course begins with an overview of conceptual foundations underlying behavioral and cognitive approaches to assessment and treatment. We will proceed to examine several techniques associated with the Cognitive-Behavioral spectrum, including schema analysis and other cognitive formulations, cognitive restructuring, and (toward the more behavioral end of the spectrum), functional analysis, exposure treatment, and contingency management. Students will be introduced to CBT protocols for treatment of depression, various anxiety disorders, and personality disorders. Throughout, we will attend to the conceptualization and role of the therapeutic relationship in CBT. Finally, we will explore some more recent developments that have begun to stretch the boundaries of CBT, to target relational and spiritual themes.

PYS 776 Advanced Seminar: Conflict Resolution – Theory and Practice
2 credits
This course will examine potential ways to integrate theories and practices of conflict resolution in the treatment of individuals, couples, families, small groups, and societal problems. We will explore various psychotherapy approaches (e.g., cognitive-behavioral, narrative, and psychodynamic) from the perspective of resolving intrapsychic and interpersonal conflicts. We will also consider how theories and practices of mediation and negotiation interface with a range of psychotherapy interventions. Students will complete a project that applies theories and practices of conflict resolution to their area of special interest in clinical practice.

PYC 712 Advanced Seminar: Contemporary Psychoanalytic Practice
3 credits
This applied seminar explores the diversity of experiences and professional opportunities available for the psychoanalytic practitioner. Clinical, personal, social, and organizational events will be discussed from a comparative framework that reflects the ferment and vitality of current theories and practices within psychoanalysis. The emphasis will be on the conceptualization and communication of psychoanalytically informed knowledge and process in a wide variety of practice situations (e.g., evaluation, administration and management, leadership development, supervision, consultation, education, research, and treatment).

PYS 701 Advanced Seminar: Countertransference and Supervision
3 credits
This advanced seminar focuses on the use of countertransference in the supervisory experience. The seminar considers issues of containment and safety, unconscious communication, the action of supervision, and the use of the group. The seminar will involve an active exploration of conceptual material as manifested in clinical cases. The seminar is specifically designed to offer students an opportunity to inform and further develop their practice as psychotherapists and supervisors.

PYI 705 Advanced Seminar: Forensic Psychology
3 credits
This seminar focuses on the practice of forensic psychology with an emphasis on the context for a relationship between the law and behavioral sciences. Following a general overview of the legal and court systems, including the history and role of mental health experts in the judiciary, this seminar focuses on six primary ways that clinical psychologists provide services to legal professionals: competency in the clinical process, mental status at the time of the offense, sentencing and rehabilitation, civil commitment and civil competencies, compensation for mental or emotional injuries, children and families, and juvenile justice. With each of these venues, students learn how to appreciate the relevant legal issues and to better communicate important psychological findings to courts and legal professionals.

PYI 707 Advanced Seminar: Mindfulness
3 credits
This course explores the implications and applications of mindfulness – moment-to-moment awareness and acceptance of one’s experience (Germer, 2005) – to various aspects of the clinical enterprise. Students will learn how mindfulness training can be directly applied to the alleviation of patient suffering. In addition, students will learn how their own mindfulness practice can enhance their therapeutic relationships and personal well-being.

PY 719 Advanced Seminar: Health Psychology
3 credits
This course provides an overview of the emerging field of clinical health psychology and behavioral medicine. There will be a focus on the delivery of clinical services in an interdisciplinary health care setting, with an emphasis on the role of the psychologist as consultant to a variety of medical subspecialties. Topics to be reviewed include the psychophysiology of stress, the stress-illness connection, relevant aspects of affective science, psychoneuroimmunology, the psychology of pain, treatment adherence, and psychosocial variables in chronic health conditions. In addition, the factors mediating the health-illness continuum will be examined, with particular emphases on diversity and the psychology of wellness. Students are introduced to various tools, including biofeedback, relaxation training, meditation, clinical hypnosis, and psychophysiological psychotherapy.

PYI 704 Advanced Seminar: Integrative Psychotherapy
3 credits
This is a skills-based seminar where students learn to combine different theoretical orientations and therapy techniques to provide maximally effective help. While based on theoretical and research literature, the focus is on the development of therapy integration skills. Integrative techniques will be drawn from the cognitive-behavioral, psychodynamic, psychophysiological, and spiritual conceptualizations of emotional recovery. Clinical areas to be covered include depression, anxiety, trauma, eating disorders, and borderline personality disorder.

PY 821 Advanced Seminar: Intervention With Children and Adolescents
3 credits
This course integrates theory and practice of interventions for child and adolescent problems. A variety of theoretical models, empirically supported treatments, and treatment modalities are presented. Students learn specific techniques to enhance communication with children and adolescents, so that they can successfully apply a variety of interventions in their work. The need to work cooperatively with parents, schools, and pediatricians is addressed. By the end of this course, students will be able to design and implement treatment programs for children and adolescents that are consistent with their assessment data and case conceptualization.

PY 737A Advanced Seminar: Object Relations Theory
3 credits
This seminar provides an overview of the theoretical foundation and critical concepts of object relations theory. It is designed to give the student a significant grasp of personality structure, dynamics, and development within an object relational framework. The seminar provides students with a lens through which they can consider case conceptualization and treatment issues applicable to various clinical problems, settings, and populations. It offers students a personal opportunity to bring dimension and understanding to their clinical work as they explore, in depth, the application of Object Relations theory to clinical practice.

PY 842 Advanced Seminar: Professional Geropsychology
3 credits
This course examines and explores the following topics and issues from the perspective of providing clinical services: adult development an aging; building rapport with older clients, transference and countertransference; adapting therapy to this population; stressors, such as chronic health problems, loss, retirement, and financial strain. After establishing this broader context, the most prevalent disorders in the elderly population are examined including: dealing with cognitive and other changes associated with the aging process; illness, death, dying, and grief; depression. The role of informal and formal social supports as well as treatment in institutional contexts are examined.

PY 834 Advanced Seminar: Psychological Testing and Evaluation of Infants, Children, and Adolescents
3 credits
This course examines psychological assessment with infants, children, and adolescents. Through this course students will have exposure to testing measures most often used to evaluate this population as well as how to develop a battery of tests appropriate to the referral question. Testing measures will include developmental, cognitive, social emotional, personality, and behavioral instruments. Integrating testing data with history, behavioral observation, records, and clinical interviews to develop a meaningful psychological testing report will be practiced. It is outside of the scope of this course to cover the breadth of all psychological tests available to psychologists. Instead, this course will focus on developing a comprehensive picture of an individual through using psychological tests to bolster inferences and intervention recommendations.

PYI 708 Advanced Seminar: Spirituality & Religious Issues
3 credits
This course will present a rationale for training clinical psychologists to attend to clients’ spiritual and religious issues. Students will develop a working definition of spirituality and religion. To enhance students’ multicultural competence, we will delineate the core tenets of the five largest organized religions in the United States (Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism). Students will learn to assess religious and spiritual problems and identify some of the key spiritual issues that might arise during the course of therapy (e.g., 12-Step Programs, mindfulness, acceptance, forgiveness, hope, serenity, atheism/agnosticism, death and dying, etc.). The course will also outline potential interventions and explore ways of incorporating spiritual and religious issues into the treatment of clients. The second focus of the course is intended to enhance the self-awareness of students’ spiritual identity as it impacts their clinical performance. Students will explore their own core values, assumptions, and biases regarding issues of spirituality and religion.

PYC 710 Advanced Seminar: Substance Abuse Theory and Practice
3 credits
Substance abuse treatment is a critical and common clinical issue, with increasing numbers seeking inpatient and outpatient treatment. This course goes into greater detail on topics overviewed in the one-credit substance abuse workshop. The course will help students expand their knowledge of current research and effective assessment strategies. Biological effects and neuropsychological syndromes and disorders related to substance abuse will be included. Twelve-step, psychoanalytic, cognitive/behavioral; marital family, pharmacologic, and motivational conceptualizations and models of treatment will be covered, with an emphasis on evidence-based intervention strategies. Students will develop the clinical knowledge and skills for effective work with this population.

PY 710 Biological Foundations of Clinical Psychology
2 credits
The basic goal of this course is to examine the physiological basis of behavior; that is, to approach psychology from a biological perspective. This goal is achieved through examination of the structure and function of the nervous system and related systems; the role of the nervous system in “normal” behavior such as eating, sleeping, etc.; and the role of the nervous system in psychopathology and neuropsychological disorders. An emphasis is placed on learning the language of physiological psychology.

PY 884A Case Conference I
3 credits
During this year students will have an intensive small group supervisory experience with faculty. Emphasis is on case presentations, including video and audio tapes, with a goal of examining students’ clinical work.

PY 885A Case Conference II
3 credits
This is a continuation of Case Conference I. The clinical aspect of the Qualifying Examination takes place in the context of this course. During this semester there is also an opportunity to work on conceptual and personal issues stimulated by the Qualifying Exam.

PY 714 Clinical Psychopharamacology
1 credit
(Weekend Course) This course will focus on the clinical uses of psychotropic medications in the treatment of mood disorders, psychotic disorders, and anxiety disorders. The mechanisms by which abused substances affect the body and drugs used in the treatment of substance abuse disorders will also be covered. The basic biology underlying these disorders will be presented as part of the discussion of the therapeutic mechanisms of drug action.

PY 720 Cognitive Aspects of Behavior
3 credits
This course examines current cognitive, social cognitive, and cognitive constructivist/constructionist theories both with regard to their particular implications and as metatheories. Topics in cognitive psychology include history of the cognitive position; the current status of learning theory; social cognition; cognitivism and constructionism; memory; emotion and affect; dynamic psychology and cognition; cognitive self processes, and cultural cognitive psychology and constructionist views of diversity.(This course is not a course on cognitive therapy.)

PY 812A Consultation: Theory and Practice I
1 credit
(Weekend Course) This course examines the role of psychologists as consultants in mental health settings and in the community. A variety of consulting experience is explored including case consultation, participation in interdisciplinary teams, and the psychologist as expert in dealing with diverse individuals, groups, and organizations. The course examines issues of contacting, data gathering, diagnosis, intervention, evaluation, and follow-up. Implications of the consultant’s role in education, training, and organizational development are addressed. Participants have the opportunity to apply consultation skills in experiential exercises and also examine the possible consultancy aspect of their practicum role.

PY 812B Consultation: Theory and Practice II
1 credit
(Weekend Course) This weekend course examines the role of psychologists as consultants in mental health settings and in the community. Building on the theoretical frameworks introduced in Consultation I, the course will address broad issues of responding to consultation requests, framing consultation relationships, assessment, data gathering, intervention, and evaluation. Students will explore various aspects of consultation practice, including consultation function, model, focal expertise, and type of consultation relationship.

PYC 705 Dialectical Behavior Therapy
1 credit
(Weekend Course) After providing an overview of this model, developed by Marsha Linehan for the treatment of “disordered behaviors,” including the underlying dialectical and behavioral principles, this course focuses on the following DBT treatment strategies: dialectical, validation, problem-solving, managing contingencies, observing limits, skills training, exposure, cognitive modification, stylistic, case management, structural, crisis, and suicidal behavior treatment strategies. The outcome research on this empirically supported treatment is evaluated. Lecture, discussion, role-plays, videotape, mindfulness exercises, and small group tasks are utilized to facilitate the learning of the DBT model.

PY 789 Dialogue and Difference: Beyond Polarization, Marginalization, and Identity Politics
1 credit
(Weekend Course) This course presents an approach to addressing issues of sociocultural diversity and social concerns of justice and professional responsibility. While informed by feminist, multicultural, and post-colonial theories, this course moves away from an identity specific approach and instead applies an interpretive (hermeneutic) and procedural framework to the enhancement of mutual understandings across seemingly noncommensurate social conflicts.

PY 899 Doctoral Dissertation
0 credits
Students enroll in PY 899 when they are continuing work on their dissertations during internship or beyond the internship year.

PYR 875 Doctoral Research Seminar I
1 credit
The aim of this two-year sequence is to facilitate students’ development and completion of a doctoral dissertation. During this first semester the emphasis is on helping each student to select a topic which touches upon a theme or area of genuine interest or concern, and to design a realistic dissertation proposal using appropriate methodology. The instructor for each section will also serve as the chair of the Dissertation Committee for members of the section.

PYR 876 Doctoral Research Seminar II
2 credits
This course is a continuation of Doctoral Research Seminar I.

PYR 877 Doctoral Research Seminar III
2 credits
This course represents a continuation and intensification of the dissertation process begun in the third year with Doctoral Research Seminars I and II.

PYR 878 Doctoral Research Seminar IV
1 credit
This course is a continuation of Doctoral Research Seminar III.

PYC 730 The Dream in Clinical Practice
1 credit
(Weekend Course) This course explores the use of dreams in clinical work from a variety of perspectives. Cultural and historical perspectives on dreams, dreamers, and dream interpreters will be discussed. Empirical human and animal dream studies and contemporary neurophysiological research will be reviewed. From a psychodynamic view, we will consider dreams as diagnostic indicators of psychic structure and content, facilitators of deeper and more authentic communication, as objects of mutual exploration, as retreats and advances, as well as serving as the “royal road to the unconscious.” Participants will be asked to bring in dream specimens from a variety of sources: literature, film and television, clients, and their own.

PY 721A Ericksonian Hypnotherapy
1 credit
(Weekend Course) Incorporation of Ericksonian-style hypnosis in the process of psychotherapy is featured throughout the weekend of instruction, demonstration, and practice. Special emphasis will be placed on utilization of ego-states resources in effecting trauma depotentiation and reframing.

PYS 780 Health Service Delivery Systems
1 credit
This course presents theory, practice, and research applicable to understanding the health service delivery system. This includes an advanced discussion of the professional psychologist as a change agent in the larger social, political, and economic contexts, and the professional psychologist’s roles within private and public sectors. An experiential approach will be utilized in order to provide students with hands-on opportunities as a way to achieve students’ learning objectives. Initially the course will focus on an overview of the current National Health Service delivery system. This will include exploration of the influence of culture and society on mental health, the effects of public policy on the delivery of mental health services, the impact of managed care on systems of service delivery, ethical and moral issues associated with managed care. In addition, students will form learning teams based upon their personal interests and passions. Learning teams will research their areas of interest and develop a program (i.e., a method of service delivery) in response to an existing funding source. Included in this section are issues involving assessing community need, program design and development, program evaluation, service outputs, outcome management, evidence-based practices, staff resources and budgets.

PY 702 Historical and Social Context of Psychology
2 credits
This course examines the historical and philosophical context of psychology. While attention is paid to some of the more ancient philosophical themes anticipating psychology, the focus is predominantly on a critique of modern scientific and applied psychology to expose its social-relational aspects. Current poststructuralist, social constructionist, and historical critiques are integrated with voices from the history of science and modern philosophy in order to improve our understanding of where psychology is today.

PY 777B Human Diversity and the Clinical Enterprise
3 credits
This course utilizes principles and concepts of multicultural and cross-cultural psychology to attempt to acquire an increased understanding of diverse underrepresented groups, with an emphasis on understanding racism, sexism, heterosexism, classism, and ageism. It utilizes the multicultural competencies perspective to facilitate learning how to perform effective clinical work with individuals who are of different cultures, ethnicities, genders, sexual orientations, socioeconomic status, ages, ability, religion, and spirituality.

PY 718A Human Sexuality and Sex Therapy
1 credit
(Weekend Course) This course is designed for those new to working with sex-related problems. The focus is on the pragmatic: understanding the theoretical underpinning of sexual disorders; clarifying one’s own sexual attitudes, feelings, and preferences; using sexual language comfortably; offering permission; dispelling myths, and understanding how and when to offer specific suggestions. Students learn to think about sexual dilemmas as complex individual, interpersonal, and intergenerational dynamics; and to view sexual problems as developmental challenges and interlocking binds. The course uses cognitive-behavioral, family systems, and analytic perspectives.

PYC 735 Infant Mental Health
1 credit
This weekend course will focus on psychologist’s roles in the specialty field of Infant Mental Health. IMH refers to the optimal social and emotional development of a child (0-6) in the context of critical attachment relationships. Core competencies in this field will be outlined and some discussed in depth. While it is outside of the scope of this course to address all of the key IMH competencies in depth, we will review each briefly so interested students can leave with an understanding of what is required to gain expertise in IMH. We will consider the impact of trauma and traumatic stress on children’s development as well as the critical role of attachment. Assessment and diagnosis of this population will be explored, including the integration of the DC: 0-3R and DSM-IV-TR. Psychotherapeutic treatment approaches for this population will be presented through theoretical material and clinical case examples.

PY 792 Intake Interviewing Skills
1 credit
This weekend course is a continuation of basic interviewing skills learned in Professional Seminar, building on relational skills of non-directive listening and attending skills, and moving towards more directive assessment and history gathering skill, with a goal of being able to do a full first session evaluation and write up of an initial intake report. The course will cover: problem assessment, history taking, mental status examination, substance abuse assessment, and risk assessment. Different clinical contexts will also be addressed, i.e. working with diversity, child and adolescent interviewing. Course work will include practice of interviewing skills, and writing an initial intake report based on a live role played interview.

PY 896, PY 897 Internship Fourth Year, Fifth Year
0 credits
Prior to graduation, each student must successfully complete an approved internship of 2,000 hours within 24 calendar months which meets the guidelines published by the Association of Psychology and Postdoctoral Internship Centers (APPIC) as well as the Council for the National Register of Health Service Providers in Psychology. Internship may be pursued in several formats: half-time during the fourth and fifth years; full time during the fifth year, etc. Fourth-year students should register for PY 896, Internship and fifth year plus students should register for PY 897, Internship.

PY 799 Management
1 credit
This course is a brief conceptual introduction to issues of work organizations and management. Students are exposed to various models of how organizations function, management, leadership, change, change agents, action research, work teams, and productivity. Part of the learning involves envisioning improved structures and relationships within the many workplace settings of psychologists.

PY 815C Methods of Psychological Assessment I
3 credits
This year-long sequence provides an introduction to the psychological assessment of individuals. The emphasis in the fall semester is on cognitive assessment and in the spring the major focus is on the role of psychological tests in personality assessment. As time permits attention will be paid to psychoeducational and neuropsychological assessment. Students develop beginning competence in the administration, scoring, and interpretation of standard assessment tools (WAIS-III/WISC-IV/WJ-III).

PY 816 Methods of Psychological Assessment II
3 credits
This course continues an introduction to psychological assessment of individuals, with the major focus in the spring on the role of psychological tests in personality assessment. Students develop beginning competence in the administration, scoring, and interpretation of standard projective psychodiagnostic techniques. Primary attention is given to the Rorshach. Other projective techniques are considered as time permits.

PYC 728 Narrative Therapy
1 credit
(Weekend Course) This workshop will provide an overview of narrative therapy and practices. It will examine how clinicians can use a narrative metaphor and view problems as separate from people and as situated in larger sociopolitical contexts. Numerous clinical practices will be presented, such as the attitudinal stance of the therapist, the use of questions, externalizing practices, the role of teams both physical and virtual, and the use of client documentation.

PY 730 Personality: Theory and Assessment
3 credits
This course will provide an overview of critical concepts, theory and knowledge about personality structure, dynamics, change, and development. Using case examples, the assessment and diagnosis of personality will be explored through the integration of test data, interview, history, and theoretical understanding. The course facilitates the student’s development of a viewpoint that can be related to treatment issues and concepts of health and maladaptive behavior. Specific theory topics include: drive theory; ego psychology; object relations theory; interpersonal theory; self psychology; social constructivism, biological/evolutionary, and French post-structuralist and feminist perspectives on personality theory. The theories will be examined regarding issues of individual differences and group differences; including differences in culture, gender, sexual orientation, and social and economic class.

PYC 726 Positive Psychology: Research and Practice
1 credit
(Weekend Course) In the emerging field of positive psychology the focus is shifting from what is wrong with people to what is right. Helping people identify and use their strengths can help relieve suffering and improve everyday functioning. Through a combination of lecture and hands-on positive psychology exercises participants will learn: the role of positive feelings, assessment of positive experiences, the latest research on happiness and life satisfaction, how to identify and use psychological strengths, the “three paths to happiness,” the powerful effects of optimism and how to develop it, and the role of positive psychology in health, families, and work.

PY 893 Practicum
3 credits
Coupled with PY 884A and PY 885A Case Conference I and II.

PY 892 Practicum
3 credits
Coupled with PY 882B and PY 883B Professional Seminar III and IV.

PY 893B Practicum
1 credit
This practicum is for third-year students required to extend their practicum through the summer and who are doing well beyond the required 600 hours. credit can be used in lieu of a weekend course credit only. This is not a required practicum.

PY 894A Practicum
1 credit
This practicum is for fourth-year students required to extend their practicum through the summer and who are doing well beyond the required 600 hours. credit can be used in lieu of a weekend course credit only. This is not a required practicum.

PY 880B, PY 881B Professional Seminar I & II: Relationships, Roles, and Ethics
3 credits each
This first year of a two-year sequence has as an important function helping students in joining the profession and becoming psychology graduate students at Antioch University New England. The focus of the first semester is on the many roles of psychologists; for the second semester it is on ethical and legal issues in the practice of psychology.

PY 882B, PY 883B Professional Seminar III and IV: Case Conceptualization and Demonstrations
3 credits each
The year-long Professional Seminar continues to provide the setting for pursuing a number of related objectives, serving as a forum for examination of the students’ professional work and training. During this second year there is an emphasis on case conceptualization and on writing up case formulations. Students read about several different theoretical models and applications. There is a focus on student presentations and discussions.

PY 732 Psychological Development
3 credits
This course approaches behavior in infancy, early childhood, adolescence, and adulthood through the framework of a Life Span Developmental theoretical orientation. Classical developmental theories as well as issues in development such as emotional, social, cognitive, and moral growth are examined within this context. The student learns about clinical and theoretical problems in development through required readings and case material.

PY 772 Psychology in the Community
2 credits
This course examines psychology in the community context, with special attention to community psychology, prevention, and psychological services delivery systems. Central topics include: primary and secondary prevention; the community mental health center movement; the role of psychologists outside the consulting room; issues in service delivery and managed care; socio-economic status, and the political and regulatory aspects of psychology.

PY 731 Psychopathology and Behavioral Disorders
3 credits
This course emphasizes an integrated biopsychosociocultural model in understanding the etiology of psychopathology. After critiquing the assumptions and biases inherent in DSM-IV, it focuses on the diagnostic criteria for the most prevalent psychiatric disorders of adulthood and childhood, including: thought, mood, anxiety, substance abuse, memory, dissociative, eating, adjustment, personality, and sexual disorders. Through the use of clinical vignettes, students further develop their capacity for making reliable differential diagnoses. In order to encompass a diversity of viewpoints, psychopathology is presented from biological, cognitive-behavioral, feminist, and psychodynamic perspectives.

PYC 700 Psychotherapeutic Intervention I: Individual and Family
3 credits
This is the first half of a year-long course sequence in the theory and practice of psychotherapy. The goal of this course is to help students begin to develop a flexible, evidence-based style of conducting treatment with adults, focusing on brief to mid-range durations. Emphasis in this semester is on psychodynamic, behavioral, cognitive, interpersonal, existential, social constructionist, and above all, integrated case formulation. Selected clinical topics, process, and diversity issues are considered across a variety of psychological syndromes and presentations.

PYC 701 Psychotherapeutic Intervention II: Individual and Family
3 credits
This is the second half of a year-long course sequence in the theory and practice of psychotherapy. The goal of this course is to help students begin to develop a flexible, evidence-based style of conducting psychotherapy, focusing on brief to mid-range durations. Emphasis in this semester is on systems-oriented child and family therapies. The course includes an examination of the fundamentals of systems theories with special focus on child, family and couples modalities. Selected clinical practice, process, and diversity issues are considered across a variety of psychological syndromes and presentations.

PYC 702 Psychotherapeutic Intervention III: Group
2 credits
This is a continuation of the fall and spring semester courses, with the emphasis on group. This course provides an introduction to current, clinically relevant knowledge and theory about behavior in groups and about the dilemmas of group life. It also provides an in-depth look at the various types of group activities commonly conducted by professional psychologists. Specific topics to be addressed include: the individual in the group; issues of group development; group as a whole; leadership in groups; individual differences and diversity within groups; ethics and group therapy; transference issues in groups; functional roles of group members; and unconscious dynamics in group life. The aim is to provide didactic and experiential learning opportunities which enhance the ability of students to test theory against the realities of group life as they experience them.

PY 708 Psychotherapeutic Intervention IV: Special Topics in Intervention
2 credits
This course is designed to address a variety of special topics related to clinical intervention. Work with specific populations, problems, intervention strategies, issues, or in specific settings may be covered. Possible topics include: severe mental illness; substance abuse; personality disorders; dual diagnosis; geriatrics; treatment of children and adolescents; and disaster response.

PYC 707 Psychotherapy with LGBT Clients
1 credit
This course focuses on psychotherapy with gay men, lesbian women, bisexual and transsexual/transgender people. It emphasizes conceptualization, core developmental themes and clinical intervention with adolescents, adults and couples. Students will examine the social context and construction of both same-sex orientation and gender, prejudice and antigay-anti-trans internalizations, biological information, minority identities and multiple oppression. The emphasis will be how these influence the lives of LGBT and their implications for psychotherapy to promote psychosocial resilience as well as address psychopathology. APA guidelines for psychotherapy will provide a context for the course.

PYS 775 Public Policy and Advocacy
1 credit
This course presents theory, practice, and research applicable to understanding public policy and advocacy. This includes an advanced discussion of the professional psychologist as a change agent in the larger social, political, and economic contexts, and the professional psychologist’s roles within private and public sectors. An experiential approach will be utilized in order to provide students with “hands on” opportunities as a way to achieve students’ learning objectives. The course begins with a focus on health care and mental health care policy and advocacy on a national level. Students will explore the role of psychologist as advocate in the formation and implementation of public policy at the national, state and local levels. Students will have the opportunity to research a mental health policy issue and pursue ways to advocate for the policy. Students will work on briefing papers, constituent letter, an opinion editorial and a public service announcement. Issues include health care and mental health care reform, public policy and cultural competence, health disparities, psychology in the public interest, the effects of policy on psychological practice, prescriptive authority and psychologist as advocate.

PY 871 Research Methods and Statistics I
3 credits
The Research Methods sequence surveys both qualitative and quantitative research strategies in psychology. Topics include philosophy of science, critical thinking, ethical and diversity considerations in research, basic descriptive and inferential (primarily univariate) statistics, evaluating psychosocial interventions, and the use of computers for data management and analysis. The goal of the course is to help students develop the interest and skills to undertake systematic inquiry in applied or theoretical domains. Completion of an introductory research course at the undergraduate level is assumed, though not required.

PY 872 Research Methods and Statistics II
3 credits
This course is a continuation of PY 871: Research Methods and Statistics I.

PYC 721 Sandtray Therapy Technique Workshop
1 credit
(Weekend Course) This course provides didactic and experiential training in the use of sandtray therapy in assessment and intervention. Underlying theory and empirical research on the use of sandtray technique in psychotherapy will be discussed. The development of sandtray materials, effective introduction to the client, and incorporation of the technique into ongoing psychotherapy will be covered. In addition, interpretive issues and approaches will be introduced as students experience their own process in the sand during this intensive course.

PY 822 Sleep Dimension in Psychotherapy
1 credit
(Weekend Course) This one credit workshop will focus on “the sleep dimension” in the context of clinical practice. The topic will be introduced with numerous psychotherapy cases in which sleep disturbance played an important role. Participants will be strongly encouraged to bring their own case material, maintaining the clients’ anonymity, to class. The topic of sleep will then be developed first by introducing the physiology of sleep, then by identifying the kinds of psychiatrically relevant symptoms that arise when a client has slept poorly – and indicating how awareness of these kinds of symptoms can inform diagnosis and treatment. The next section of the course will present the distinction between disordered sleep and formal sleep disorders, providing the relevant nosology and extensive background into the signs and symptoms associated with each. Finally, procedures that can be used when working with a specific client, including sleep-related diagnosis and treatment, will be introduced. An important component will be learning how to integrate this aspect of the client’s presenting complaints into the larger clinical picture.

PY 703 A Social History of Popular Psychological Discourses
1 credit
(Weekend Course) This course examines psychology as one of many modern forms of discourse. Participants will be introduced to some of the ways in which psychology has entered into and contributed to transformations of social relations in modern western cultures. Various discursive media will be explored, including linguistic, artistic, and spatial forms. Particular attention will be paid to popular media, such as 18th century chapbooks, Victorian public lectures and instructional print, self-help publications, and technology.

PYC 711 Social Justice in Clinical Psychology
1 credit
Over the course of this weekend workshop, we will strive to conceptualize how we, as individuals and as members of this profession, can promote social justice through our clinical practice. This workshop will expand students’ views of the limits of how we, as psychologists, can contribute to a better life using alternative modes of practice. Participants will explore the rhetoric of “social justice,” better understand the similarities and differences between social justice and multiculturalism, and/or participate in discussion and dialogue on the implications of disciplinary boundaries for those we hope to help. Participants will read a series of essays prior to the class that will form the theoretical and practical foundations of our work together.

PY 786 Social Psychology and Social Responsibility
2 credits
This course surveys social psychological research and theory and applies this knowledge base to issues of interest in clinical psychology. In the class, we consider issues such as society’s role in defining mental illness, patterns of violence in our culture, attitudes and motivated reasoning, stress and coping processes, gender issues, and stigma and related problems. This course will utilize a combination of readings, classroom activities, writing, and projects to familiarize students with a social psychological perspective.

PY 894C Special Proficiency Practicum
1 credit
This is a Practicum for Year IV students wishing to have further clinical training experience with a specific focus for a minimum of 80 hours per semester (Summer) and 100 hours per semester (Fall and Spring).

PYC 715 Spiritual & Religious Issues in Psychology
1 credit
In this course, students will develop a working definition of spirituality and religion, clarifying the relationship between the two. To enhance students’ multicultural competence, we will delineate the core tenets of the five largest organized religions in the United States (Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism), and students will explore their own core values, assumptions, and biases in this area of diversity. Students will learn to assess religious and spiritual problems and identify some of the key spiritual issues that might arise during the course of therapy (e.g., 12-Step Programs, mindfulness, acceptance, forgiveness, hope, serenity, death and dying, etc.). Finally, students will explore ways of incorporating spiritual and religious issues into the treatment of their clients as a dimension of providing holistic care.

PYC 729 Sport and Exercise Psychology
1 credit
(Weekend Course) This workshop focuses on introducing the student to the exciting and emerging field of sport and exercise psychology. Teacher, researcher, clinician, consultant, and mental coach roles will be presented along with the theoretical underpinnings that provide the foundation for these roles. Another point of emphasis will be what one can do to successfully build a sport and exercise psychology component into one’s professional career. Case examples and demonstrations will be used to demonstrate principles covered in the course.

PYC 727 Substance Abuse and Dependence
1 credit
This weekend course will provide an overview of one of the most common conditions encountered by clinicians: substance use disorders. Failure to identify and provide treatment and/or referral for substance use disorders plagues health care providers and undermines their credibility. Successful recognition and treatment on the other hand improves treatment outcomes and provides numerous additional professional opportunities for the practicing psychologist. After an overview and brief history of the field this course will consider the following topics: definitions of terms, epidemiology, screening and assessment, three evidence based treatment approaches, the outcome literature, the neurophysiology of abuse and dependence, pharmacologic treatment, “dual diagnosis”, intervention, coerced treatment, employee assistance, non-drug addictions and health care policy issues.

PY 811 Substance Abuse: Theory and Practice
1 credit
(Weekend Course) Substance abuse treatment has become a critical clinical issue over the past decade, with increasing numbers seeking both inpatient and outpatient treatment. This weekend course is designed to help students expand their knowledge of current research; assess treatment modalities; and develop clinical skills in dealing with this population. Both theory and technique will be addressed, and include 12-step, psychoanalytic, cognitive/behavioral, marital/family, and motivational models of treatment.

PY 867 Supervised Experience in the Teaching of Psychology
1 credit
This course is restricted to third and fourth year students and involves supervised teaching of a psychology course at Antioch Students conduct background research, prepare material to teach, present the material, supervise small group activities, and grade course assignments, all under the supervision of the primary faculty person. (NOTE: Students who have previously received credit for this course must register for ANE 890, SIS: Applied Experience in Consultation and Education.)

PY 890 Supervised Independent Study (SIS)
Variable credits
The SIS is for students who wish to have a directed learning experience focused on a specific project or area of interest. Students in their third and fourth year may elect an SIS in an Applied Experience in Clinical Psychology organized according to the NCSPP competency areas (relationship, assessment, intervention, research and evaluation, consultation and education, management and supervision, diversity) or an Advanced Supervised Study in the core knowledge bases of psychology.

PY 723 Supervision
2 credits
This course is designed to give students an introduction to supervision that is both didactic and experiential. The course begins with an overview of supervision, including such topics as the purpose and goals of supervision, theoretical models of supervision, roles in supervision, the development of the supervisor and the supervisee, the context of supervision, the evaluative process, the supervisory relationship, issues of diversity in supervision, ethics and supervisory practice, and research on supervision. After exploration and discussion of these areas, students have an opportunity to observe faculty and field supervisors demonstrate supervision in the classroom, as well as practice the role of supervisor in small groups with their peers.

PY 870 Tests and Measurements in Psychology
3 credits
This course is an introductory survey of tests and measurements whose purpose is twofold. First, it provides the academic background for clinically oriented coursework in psychological testing. The psychometrics of tests and controversies around testing are discussed. Students learn to evaluate tests critically, and to select and implement an assessment battery. These topics make up approximately two-thirds of the course. Second, measurement knowledge provides a basis for students to apply themselves to a beginning level of understanding and application of the MMPI-2, PAI, and the MCMI-III. Work on these three clinical tests comprises the remaining one-third of the course.

PY 863 Writing Workshop I
1 credit
(Weekend Course) This course helps students develop technical writing skills appropriate for doctoral level psychologists. We begin with an overview of basic writing skills, and then focus on more advanced skills such as integrating professional literature; writing logical, well-organized papers; and developing successful writing habits. The course also covers APA writing standards for professional reports, papers, dissertations, and general publications. Hands-on exercises help students immediately apply new skills. This course can be repeated for credit.

PY 868 Writing Workshop II
1 credit
(Weekend Course) This course focuses on writing skills specifically needed to complete a scholarly literature review, such as that required for the doctoral dissertation. Course content will include a quick review of basic writing components (grammar, punctuation, structure, outlining, and APA style) covered in Writing Workshop I. The instructor will then provide new information and concepts about each component as related to writing a dissertation. The workshop will also cover how to create, organize, and write a dissertation literature review, as well as provide an introduction to critical analysis (inductive and deductive reasoning, ambiguity and vagueness, testing the validity of an argument, etc.) to help each student conceptualize, organize, and write his or her dissertation.