ABA Course Descriptions

The Behavior Analyst Certification Board Inc.® has approved the following course sequence as meeting the coursework requirements for eligibility to take the Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analyst Examination® or the Board Certified Behavior Analyst Examination®. Applicants will have to meet additional requirements to qualify.

Teacher and Child

Ethical Considerations in Behavior Analysis (1 credit)

Competency Area: Professional Ethics
This course will familiarize students with the ethical guidelines required for conducting applied behavior analysis in a professional manner. The course content focuses on the importance of practicing within one’s competency limits, obtaining consent, utilizing research-based methods and protecting confidentiality as it relates to the behavior analytic field. This course emphasizes the necessity of protecting a client’s dignity, health, and safety in the applied field.

Applied Behavior Analysis I (3 credits)

Competency Area: Definitions and Characteristics & Principles, Processes, and Concepts
This course is an introductory course that will provide students with a strong foundation in the basic concepts and principles of applied behavior analysis, as well as the history and philosophical assumptions of behavior analysis. Upon completion of the course students will be able to differentiate between experimental analysis of behavior and applied behavior analysis, apply the dimensions of applied behavior analysis for evaluating interventions, and become fluent with the lexicon of applied behavior analysis.

Applied Behavior Analysis II (3 credits)

Competency Area: Behavior Change Procedures & Systems Support
This course will provide students with advanced knowledge of the principles of applied behavior analysis for modifying behavior, and for developing and monitoring systems so as to support behavior change. Students will develop competencies in the areas of identification and assessment of reinforcers, specific procedures for increasing and decreasing behaviors, schedules of reinforcement, various instructional procedures, and designing performance monitoring for overall program and procedural integrity.

Assessment (3 credits)

Competency Area: Behavioral Assessment & Selecting Intervention Outcome Strategies
Students will demonstrate the ability to conduct and interpret a comprehensive functional behavioral assessment, including descriptive and functional analysis. Students will learn how to select appropriate assessment tools, administer assessments, and interpret the data to make research-base decisions for intervention strategies. Upon completion of this course, students will demonstrate competencies in making data-driven recommendations, appropriately modifying and accommodating the environment to support their recommendations and best practice with regards to ethical considerations, and selecting functional alternatives when eliminating behaviors.

Research Methods (3 credits)

Competency Area: Experimental Evaluation & Measurement of Behavior
Students will demonstrate competencies in the areas of single-subject experimental designs, identifying functional relationships, and selecting the appropriate treatment designs. Course content will include methods for observing and recording data, methods for displaying data; and making decisions based upon interpretation and visual analysis of data, and understanding of reliability and validity as it relates to data collection and experimental integrity. Students will be required to conduct literature reviews to supplement their knowledge of research-based practices.

Professional Seminar 1 (1 credit)

Students will be provided small-group supervision (groups of ten or fewer) to partially fulfill the mentoring requirements for BCBA exam eligibility. Students will be required to bring video samples of their fieldwork for review, feedback, and discussion. This experience is designed to further students’ understanding and generalization of the principles of applied behavior analysis; as well as to provide the opportunity for heuristic learning and application of their knowledge. The area of concentration for this course is principles, processes, and concepts of ABA including stimulus control procedures, motivating operations, and generalization and discrimination in applied settings.

Professional Seminar 2 (1 credit)

Students will be provided small-group supervision (groups of ten or fewer) to partially fulfill the mentoring requirements for BCBA exam eligibility. Students will be required to bring video samples of their fieldwork for review, feedback, and discussion. This experience is designed to further students’ understanding and generalization of the principles of applied behavior analysis; as well as to provide the opportunity for heuristic learning and application of their knowledge. The area of concentration for this seminar is motivating operations and verbal behavior.

Professional Seminar 3 (1 credit)

Students will be provided small-group supervision (groups of ten or fewer) to partially fulfill the mentoring requirements for BCBA exam eligibility. Students will be required to bring video samples of their fieldwork for review, feedback, and discussion. This experience is designed to further students’ understanding and generalization of the principles of applied behavior analysis; as well as to provide the opportunity for heuristic learning and application of their knowledge. The area of concentration for this seminar is direct instruction and discreet trial instruction.

Practicum I In Applied Behavior Analysis (2 credits)

Students must participate in an internship totaling at least 1000 hours over the course of the fall 2010, spring 2011, and summer 2011 semesters at an approved site.

Practicum II In Applied Behavior Analysis (2 credits)

Students must participate in an internship totaling at least 1000 hours over the course of the fall 2010, spring 2011, and summer 2011 semesters at an approved site.

Practicum III In Applied Behavior Analysis (2 credits)

Students must participate in an internship totaling at least 1000 hours over the course of the fall 2010, spring 2011, and summer 2011 semesters at an approved site. It is expected that the remainder of the 750 hours would be completed this semester.