Faculty

Carol Saunders

Carol Saunders

Carol is one of the founders of Conservation Psychology.  In 2003 she co-edited a special issue of the Human Ecology Review, which attempted to define this new field.  As a research faculty in the Department of Environmental Studies at Antioch University New England, in NH, Carol advises and teaches graduate students.  Previously, she had an extensive career as director of communications research at the Chicago Zoological Society.  She was responsible for a wide range of program evaluation, visitor studies and exhibit development.  Carol received her PhD in behavioral biology from Cornell University and a master’s in psychology from the University of Virginia.  For her dissertation, she used observational methods to study the ecology of baboon social behavior in Kenya. Since then, she has been studying how people develop affective connections with animals and nature, and factors that promote conservation behavior.  She is especially interested in how people experience wildlife, the personal impacts of public programs designed to focus attention on the natural world, and possible links to the development of an environmental ethic.

Louise Chawla

Louise Chawla

Louise is Professor Emerita in the Environmental Design Program at the University of Colorado in Boulder, an editor of the journal Children, Youth and Environments, and a member of the Executive Committee that directs Growing Up Boulder, a partnership between the design program, City of Boulder, Boulder Valley School District, and a number of community organizations to integrate children and youth into urban planning and design, park planning, and transportation planning. Her interest in children’s informal learning in their communities led her to a master’s in Education and Child Development at Bryn Mawr College and a doctorate in Environmental Psychology at the City University of New York. She has written widely on children and nature, children in cities, and the development of committed action for the environment. Her publications include the books In the First Country of Places: Nature, Poetry and Childhood Memory and the edited collection Growing Up in an Urbanising World. With her colleague Jill Litt, she wrote the American Public Health Association Policy Statement on “Improving Health and Wellness through Access to Nature.” She has taught graduate courses on conservation psychology for many years.

Joy Ackerman

Joy Ackerman

Joy is a core faculty member in the Department of Environmental Studies at Antioch University New England, where she serves as Director of Conservation Psychology. Joy teaches graduate courses including Conservation Psychology, Ecological Thought, and Making Sense of Place. Joy advises students in the Conservation Psychology Certificate Program, the Self-Designed MS in Environmental Studies, and doctoral students with interests in spirituality, place and nature experience. She received her PhD in environmental studies from AUNE, focusing on sacred geography through researching Walden Pond as a place of pilgrimage. She is interested in the phenomenology of place experience, environmental and ecological identity, and how people experience, develop and articulate their connection with nature.

George Tremblay

George Tremblay

George is a professor and the director of research in the Department of Clinical Psychology at Antioch University New England.  Dr. Tremblay is a licensed Psychologist in the State of New Hampshire, and a member of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT.org), and the NH Psychological Association.  His primary theoretical orientations are behavioral and systemic.  He received his PhD and master’s in Clinical Psychology from the State University of New York – University at Albany.  Since arriving at AUNE, Dr. Tremblay has become increasingly involved in supporting and evaluating the quality of community-based prevention and wellness promotion programs.  Through a private consulting group that he helped to launch in 2003 (PEER Associates), and also in partnership with Jim Fauth, Director of Antioch’s Center for Behavioral Health Innovation (BHI).

Abigail Abrash Walton

AbrashWaltonAbiAbigail serves as founding Director of Antioch University New England’s Center for Academic Innovation (CAI), co-director of Antioch’s Center for Climate Preparedness and Community Resilience (CCPCR), and as faculty in the Department of Environmental Studies, where she directs the Advocacy for Social Justice and Sustainability master’s degree concentration. Under her leadership, AUNE has developed and advanced a range of sustainability and social justice initiatives, and innovation programming at Antioch has yielded a 10-to-1 return on mission-driven investment through the CAI. Abi is interested in the nexus of environmental and human rights issues and what conditions and aspects of leadership best support translating values into effective action. Her current research focuses on climate change leadership and pro-environmental behavior. She enjoys the spirit and practice of innovation and has played a central role in piloting AUNE’s Conservation Psychology Institute and Translating Research to Inform Policy workshops and in catalyzing a national-level working group to build the capacity of scientists and researchers to engage with the public policy process. Previously, she served as program director for the Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Center for Human Rights and New Hampshire Citizens Alliance, and as a Visiting Fellow at Harvard Law School’s Human Rights Program.

This year, she is serving on the leadership team for the April 2016 Local Solutions: Eastern Regional Climate Preparedness Conference, convened by Antioch in partnership with U.S. EPA and leading a resilience Facilitated Community of Practice for county and municipal decision-makers on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, in partnership with the Eastern Shore Land Conservancy. Her recent consulting and research projects include climate change mitigation analysis for The Nature Conservancy-Vermont; collaborating with county officials on development of a climate and health adaptation plan for the Monadnock Region of New Hampshire; and Translating Research to Inform Policy workshops for the AAAS Science & Technology Policy fellows program and the Society of Social Work & Research.

Abigail holds a M.Sc. in Political Theory from the London School of Economics and Political Science, a B.A. in International Relations from the University of Pennsylvania, and a Permaculture Design Certificate from the Occidental Arts & Ecology Center.

Ruth Kermish-Allen

Ruth Kermish-Allen

Ruth is a doctoral candidate in Antioch University New England’s Environmental Studies program and the 2015 Conservation Psychology Fellow.  Ruth has a passion for designing and researching educational environments that empower learners with the skills, experiences, and confidence to develop and implement creative solutions to the environmental and social challenges they care about… in other words take action.  Ruth received her MEd in Science and Environmental Education from the University of Maine and her BS in Environmental Science from Ramapo College of New Jersey. Her research interests include developing strategies for incorporating distance learning technology in extremely rural schools, technology-infused environmental education models, and innovative professional development models for rural schools.  Her dissertation research focuses on defining the essential design elements of online learning communities for use in citizen science projects that foster environmental action.